Chinese Idiom Stories (Volume 3): Stories from Chinese history, philosophy, culture and art of war that can add wisdom to your business, your career, your relationship, your parenting and your life! [NOOK Book]

Overview

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Chinese Idiom Stories (Volume 3): Stories from Chinese history, philosophy, culture and art of war that can add wisdom to your business, your career, your relationship, your parenting and your life!

Table of Contents

Putting the finishing touch to the picture of a dragon
Give up halfway
A broken mirror joined together
The fox is sad at the death of the hare
His spear against his shield
Single- hearted devotion
To begin to dig a well when feeling thirsty
Going South by Driving the Chariot North
To Hang Books On The Ox's Horn
To Attract Jade by Laying Bricks
Everything is Ready Except the East Wind
Doing It Right
Heard On The Street And Spoken of In The Road
Heaven's Clothes Have No Stitches
An Armchair Strategist
The Dagger Shows Up At The End Of The Map Scroll
He Looked Like The Ax Thief
The Man of Qi who Worried That the Sky Would Fall

Putting the finishing touch to the picture of a dragon

In the Southern and Northern Dynasties Period, there was a painter called Zhang Sengyou. Once he visited a temple and painted on the wall four dragons, but gave none of them eyes. The onlookers felt that this was odd, and asked why he had not painted the eyes. He answered, ‘Eyes are crucial for dragons. With the eyes painted on , the dragons would fly away.’ Nobody believed this, so Zhang Zengyou took up his brush and added eyes to two of the dragons. No sooner had he finished than the two dragons flew into the sky amid a thunderstorm. The two without eyes stayed painted on the wall. This idiom is used to describe how, when writing or speaking, one or two key sentences will enhance the contents.

Give up halfway

During the Warring States Period (475-221BC), there was a man called Yue Yangzi in State Yue. One day he saw a piece of gold on the road and picked it up. He took it home and gave it to his wife. But his wife was not happy. The virtuous woman said,
"I hear that a man of morality doesn't drink a thief's water and a man of probity refuses to accept alms. What do you think of the action of picking up another's lost valuable and possessing it for one's own?"
Yue Yangzi, feeling ashamed, sent the gold back to where he found it.
The next year, Yue Yangzi felt that he should go out and visit scholars to enrich his knowledge. So he set off.
A year later, he came back home suddenly.
"Why have you returned?" asked his wife in surprise, "You've only spent one year studying with scholars."
"I come back because I missed you very much."
Without saying anything, his wife took a pair of scissors and went to the loom at which she had worked. Pointing at the half done brocade, she proclaimed,
"This brocade is woven from the finest silk. I wove one strand after another to produce the brocade. Now if I cut it, all my previous work will be wasted. It's the same with your studies. You can acquire knowledge only through diligence. Now, you've stopped halfway. Isn't it the same as cutting the brocade on the loom?"
Yue Yangzi was moved by what she said. He again left home to visit scholars. Several years later he became a learned man.

A broken mirror joined together

During the Southern and Northern Dynasties (420-589), there lived a beautiful, intelligent princess name Lechang in the State Chen. She and her husband Xu Deyan loved each other dearly.
But before long their country was in danger of being invaded by the troops of the Sui Dynasty. Princess Lechang and Xu Deyan had a premonition that their county would be occupied by the invaders and they would have to leave the palace and go into exile. During the chaos they might lose touch with each other. They broke a bronze mirror, a symbol of the unity of husband and wife into two parts and each of them kept a half. They agreed that each would take their half of the mirror to the fair during the Lantern Festival, which is on the 15th day of the first Lunar month, in the hope that would meet again. When they were united the two halves would join together. Soon their premonition came true.
During the chaos of war, the princess lost touch with her husband was taken to a powerful minister Yang Su's house and was made his mistress.
At the Lantern Festival the next year, Xu Deyan took his half of the mirror to the fair. He hoped that he could meet his wife. It so happened that a servant was selling the other half of the bronze mirror. Xu Deyan recognized it immediately. He asked the servant about his wife. As he heard about her bitter experience, tears rolled down his cheeks. Xu Deyan wrote a poem on the half of the mirror kept by his wife: "You left me with your broken mirror. Now the mirror is back but not you I can no longer see your reflection in the mirror, only the bright moon but not you."

TO BE CONTINUED... Buy now and enjoy all the stories!
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013518469
  • Publisher: eBook4Life
  • Publication date: 11/26/2011
  • Series: Chinese Idiom Stories , #3
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 23 KB

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2013

    Just 10 pages

    Read this in store on my nook. Just 15 short stories spanning 10 short pages. They don't even use proper pinyin fir Chinese names!

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