Chinese Piano Favourites

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Uncle Dave Lewis
The piano didn't arrive in China until the early '20s, and it wasn't until the early '50s that the instrument was absorbed enough into the fabric of Chinese culture that piano competitions were held there. Since the 1980s, having a piano in one's living room has become something of a status symbol in China, much as it once was in the United States, and the instrument has been very widely adopted, not only by kids but by older Chinese who were never able to access a piano when young. China has always found it difficult to bridge its culture with the rest of the world -- even China's proud heritage of violin music doesn't sound at all like that produced in the West -- ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Uncle Dave Lewis
The piano didn't arrive in China until the early '20s, and it wasn't until the early '50s that the instrument was absorbed enough into the fabric of Chinese culture that piano competitions were held there. Since the 1980s, having a piano in one's living room has become something of a status symbol in China, much as it once was in the United States, and the instrument has been very widely adopted, not only by kids but by older Chinese who were never able to access a piano when young. China has always found it difficult to bridge its culture with the rest of the world -- even China's proud heritage of violin music doesn't sound at all like that produced in the West -- but the piano has offered a medium where Chinese artists can meet the outside world halfway. Since the turn of the twenty-first century, Chinese virtuosi such as Lang Lang and Yundi Li have claimed top awards at major piano competitions outside of China, a development unheard of in even slightly earlier times. The development of Chinese piano literature began to take off in the 1970s, much of it in the form of piano transcriptions of traditional tunes among a small number proscribed by the Cultural Revolution-era Chinese government as acceptable. Pioneer pianist/composers such as Wang Jian-Zhong, Chu Wang-hua and Li Ying-hai created many of these arrangements, and they make up the lion's share of Naxos' Chinese Piano Favorites, performed by young Chinese pianist Jie Chen. Chen has taken prizes at numerous prestigious Western competitions, including the Arthur Rubinstein Competition in Tel Aviv and the Van Cliburn Competition. Chen doesn't play like a "competition pianist," however -- she employs a wonderfully flexible technique, and is by turns spontaneous, explosive, expressive and exciting. The selection is strongly pianistic and exudes charm, and the piano writing retains the traditional folk character of many of these melodies while taking a bit of the edge off the perceived exoticism and foreign-ness that has prevented many Western listeners from taking note of Chinese classical music. Some of the pieces here are staggeringly beautiful no matter what one thinks of Chinese music, for example "Liu Yang River," "Silver Clouds Chasing the Moon," and "The Sound of Big Waves." There are a couple exceptions to the "transcriptions" rule; the "Children's Suite" of Ding Shan-de was composed in 1953 as an original piece, and it demonstrates some familiarity with Russian music like Prokofiev, as does Chu Wang-hua's 1964 transcription of part of Zhu Jian-er's music for the film The Great Land Reform into "Celebrating Our New Life." In the 1930s, Russian composer Alexander Tcherepnin was based in Shanghai for several years; his example proved lasting and spread widely among Chinese musicians. The primary appeal of Chinese Piano Favorites, however, is not as much in the music -- which is very, very good -- as it is in the pianist, Jie Chen. Her projection of this repertoire, unfamiliar as it is to Western ears, affords it a sense of variety and richness of color that lifts it out of the realm of the exotic and into a comfort zone that seems cozy, even familiar. That is no small achievement in itself, and as an album, Naxos' Chinese Piano Favorites makes for an appealing and highly absorbing listen; some may even find parts of the album quite relaxing to experience in the evening hours, perhaps with a glass of brandy and a bubble bath.
Toronto Star - John Terauds
There is a lot to love in this collection of virtuosic pieces.... Jie Chen...is a sensational player, with flawless technique and winsome expression.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 12/18/2007
  • Label: Naxos
  • UPC: 747313060276
  • Catalog Number: 8570602
  • Sales rank: 178,441

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Liuyang River, for piano (trans. by Wang Jian-Zhong) - Tang Bi-Guang & Jie Chen (3:55)
  2. 2 A Hundred Birds Paying Respect to the Phoenix, for piano - Wang Jian-Zhong & Jie Chen (5:56)
  3. 3 Silver Clouds Chasing the Moon - Ren Guang & Jie Chen (3:16)
  4. 4 Flute and Drum at Sunset, for piano - Li Yinghai & Jie Chen (8:30)
  5. 5 Autumn Moon Over Still Lake (Canton) - Chinese Traditional & Jie Chen (4:04)
  6. 6 Glowing Red Morningstar Lilies - Chinese Traditional & Jie Chen (5:08)
  7. 7 The Second Spring Bathed in Moonlight - Hua Yan-jun & Jie Chen (7:45)
  8. 8 Celebrating Our New Life - Jianer Zhu & Jie Chen (2:06)
  9. 9–13 Suite For Children, for piano - Shan-de Ding & Jie Chen (8:47)
  10. 10 On the Paintings of Kaii Higashiyama, for piano: 4. The Sound of Big Waves - Lishan Wang & Jie Chen (7:58)
  11. 11 Farewell - Chinese Traditional & Jie Chen (4:54)
  12. 12 Soldiers of the Southern Sea - Chinese Traditional & Jie Chen (3:54)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Jie Chen Primary Artist
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