Chinese Stories of Ancient War Strategies: The Strategies can give you wisdom for your business, your career, your relationship, your parenting and your life!

Chinese Stories of Ancient War Strategies: The Strategies can give you wisdom for your business, your career, your relationship, your parenting and your life!

by Chinese Folklore
     
 
SNEAK PEAK:

Avoid Strength, Attack Weakness

Means that you must avoid your enemy's strength when he's too strong, but attack it's weakness. You can win without wasting your power by useless attacks to your enemy. That leads to an easy victory.
Warring States Era China
This strategy derives its name from a famous incident that occurred in 354

Overview

SNEAK PEAK:

Avoid Strength, Attack Weakness

Means that you must avoid your enemy's strength when he's too strong, but attack it's weakness. You can win without wasting your power by useless attacks to your enemy. That leads to an easy victory.
Warring States Era China
This strategy derives its name from a famous incident that occurred in 354 BC. At this time one of China's most renowned strategists, Sun Bin (A descendent of the even then famous Sun Zi) was an advisor to the king of Qi. Sun had earlier been at the court of Wei but another minister, Pang Juan, became jealous of Sun's cleverness. Through court intrigues he had Sun framed as a spy, sentenced to mutilation, and imprisoned. Sun escaped and fled to Qi. Several years later the king of Wei appointed the same Pang Juan as commander of the army and sent him to attack the capital of Zhao. The king of Zhao immediately appealed to Qi for help. The king of Qi consulted his advisors who all spoke in favour of rushing to aid their ally, only Sun Bin recommended against attacking. Sun advised: " To intervene between two warring armies is like trying to divert a tidal way by standing in its path. It would be better to wait until both armies have worn themselves out." The king agreed to wait.
The siege of Zhao had lasted more than a year when Sun Bin decided the time was ripe to come to Zhao's aid. The king of Qi appointed prince Tian Ji as general and Sun as military advisor. Tian Ji wanted to attack the Wei forces directly to lift the siege of Zhao, but again Sun advised against direct intervention saying: " Since most of Wei's troops are out of the country engaged in the siege, their own defence must be weak. By attacking the capital of Wei, we will force the Wei army to return to defend their own capital thereby lifting the siege of Zhao while destroying the Wei forces in turn." Tian Ji agreed to the plan and divided his army into two parts, one to attack the capital of Wei, and the other to prepare an ambush along the route to the capital.
When the Wei general Pang Juan heard that the capital was being attacked, he rushed his army back to defend the capital. Weakened and exhausted from the year long siege and the forced march, the Wei troops were completely caught by surprise in the ambush and suffered heavy losses. Chao was thus rescued while Pang Juan barely escaped back to Wei to recoup his losses. Sun Pin would later defeat his nemesis Pang Juan using another classic strategy.

Attracting Arrows with Straw Men
It was the time of the Three Kingdoms and Marshal ZHŌU Yú was encamped across the river from his enemy CÁO Cāo, the infamously expansionist and extremely successful leader of the state of Wèi. Zhōu Yú was short of ammunition for what he assumed was destined to be a difficult battle ahead against Cáo’s better equipped troops. He also sought to test a newly arrived military strategist ZHŪGĚ Liàng. Zhūgě was the principal military strategist to LIÚ Bèi, of the state of Hàn. Zhūgě Liàng was famous, but Zhōu had as yet little confidence in him.
So Zhōu Yú summoned Zhūgě Liáng and explained that in the coming battle against Cáo’s troops he anticipated a shortage of about 100,000 arrows, and he charged Zhūgé, as a faithful subordinate, to try to supply them within a scant ten days.
Zhūgě Liàng argued that ten days was too long to wait to engage Cáo in battle, and promised to find the necessary arrows within three days or subject himself to whatever punishment Zhōu Yú might provide. Zhūgě Liàng asked only to be provided with 500 soldiers to go to the banks of the river to collect the arrows at the end of the three days. Zhōu had difficulty believing this, but he accepted the offer.
Zhōu Yú sent his assistant LǓ Sù to look into what Zhūgě Liàng was actually doing, but Zhōu was Zhūgě’s old friend, and agreed to lend him 20 boats and about 30 soldiers per boat, as well as about a thousand of the straw men used as target practice. He was puzzled just what was involved, but it was clear that Zhūgě Liàng had something up his sleeve.
Zhūgě Liàng waited until there was a heavy fog, which as it happened did not occur until the third evening. Then he led out his soldiers in their boats under cover of darkness and fog, instructing them to hide under heavy black tarpaulins, while leaving straw men standing along the sides of the boats.

TO BE CONTINUED... Buy now and enjoy the stories in full!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014583756
Publisher:
eBook4Life
Publication date:
07/15/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
17 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >