Chip and the Karate Kick

Overview

Chip O'Hare wants to be just like the martial-arts hero Striper Mee. But when he goes to karate class,it isn't action packed at all! Chip thinks he's the best in the class at striking and kicking, so he can't understand why Mr. Leo won't give him his yellow belt. Then a run-in at the park helps Chip realize that being a true martial artist takes more than just a ferocious karate chop!

Young martial-arts fans will identify with Chip's desire for action and applaud his spirit in ...

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Overview

Chip O'Hare wants to be just like the martial-arts hero Striper Mee. But when he goes to karate class,it isn't action packed at all! Chip thinks he's the best in the class at striking and kicking, so he can't understand why Mr. Leo won't give him his yellow belt. Then a run-in at the park helps Chip realize that being a true martial artist takes more than just a ferocious karate chop!

Young martial-arts fans will identify with Chip's desire for action and applaud his spirit in this story about what it really means to be a good sport.

Chip starts taking karate lessons to be like the hero of his favorite television show, but his impatience to earn a belt gets in the way of learning the true spirit of karate.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Third in the Good Sports series, Chip and the Karate Kick by Anne Rockwell, illus. by Paul Meisel, follows avid martial arts fan Chip O'Hare as he takes karate lessons for the first time. Eager to emulate his cinematic hero, Striper Mee, the bunny has difficulty sitting through the history and meditation that fill his first lessons and is disappointed when he doesn't advance to the yellow belt level with his friends. When a bully kicks Chip and steals his friend's kite, Chip uses the principles of karate to resist the urge to fight back. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Chip O'Hare is a tough young bunny with a goal. He wants to be even tougher—in fact, he wants to be as tough as his action hero, Striper Mee, whose TV show he never misses. Naturally, when a karate school opens in town, off goes Chip to sign up. Leading the class is the delightfully phlegmatic Mr. Leo, "sensei in the dojo." Chip's "huh?" reaction is intensified when he realizes Mr. Leo is not about to award a yellow belt in a hurry to anyone less than the deserving. Then there is Nina Jane, model student, and a range of other young martial artists in training. In Meisel's art they represent an amusing cross-section of the animal kingdom. Further, in the process of following Chip's progress in the dojo, we learn how to count to ten in Japanese. In the end, once our young hero has learned to focus on others and not just himself, he gets his reward, although refreshingly, his parting line shows us he has not lost any of his spirit. Aspiring young Chips will likely be attracted to this book, although they might need to be cautioned against trying the techniques unsupervised in the real world. As for respecting opponents, looking "with the eye of the tiger," and learning to be still—we could all use lessons in these important elements of both karate and life. 2004, HarperCollins, Ages 4 to 6.
—Uma Krishnaswami
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Chip O'Hare, a young rabbit, aspires to emulate his television hero, a martial-arts champion. Joining a new dojo in town, along with a horse, a monkey, and other gi-clad friends, he takes lessons from Mr. Leo, who uses historical background, Japanese terminology, and breathing lessons, as well as the flashy kicks and strikes, to teach karate. Chip is an excellent student, but he doesn't earn his yellow belt until he understands how to handle a bully properly and proves that he is truly "learning the spirit of karate." Rockwell successfully captures her audience's attention by providing information without interfering with the pace of the story. Meisel keeps his cartoons fun, such as in the assortment of tails peeping out in a back view of the seated class.-Gay Lynn Van Vleck, Henrico County Library, Glen Allen, VA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The newest entry in the Good Sports series features a Bruce Lee wannabe (here named "Striper Mee" and recast, in Meisel's all-animal illustrations, as a tiger clad in a karate gi) who finds out what it really takes to advance in his chosen martial art. Small in size but a huge fan of TV star Mee, long-eared Chip O'Hare is ready to punch, kick, and jab his way to a quick yellow belt-but his new sensei, Mr. Leo, gently keeps telling him that he's not yet ready to advance. Chip doesn't understand, until he discovers that he can outface playground tough Bernie Bullie without fighting. That's what Mr. Leo's been waiting for him to learn. Rockwell and Meisel offer some dojo etiquette and karate terminology along with the Lesson; younger readers with dreams of breaking bones rather than boards will benefit from this understated study in developing a better attitude. (Picture book. 6-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060284428
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/27/2004
  • Series: Good Sports Ser.
  • Pages: 40
  • Age range: 4 - 6 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Anne and Lizzy Rockwell have collaborated on all the Mrs. Madoff books, including St. Patrick's Day and Presidents' Day, and Who Lives in an Alligator Hole? in the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series. Anne is the author of What's So Bad About Gasoline?; Brendan and Belinda and the Slam Dunk!; Why Are the Ice Caps Melting?; and Only Passing Through: The Story of Sojourner Truth. Lizzy is the author-illustrator of Good Enough to Eat; The Busy Body Book; and Hello Baby! Both Anne and Lizzy live in Connecticut.

Paul Meisel has illustrated many books for children, including What's So Bad About Gasoline?, Why Are the Ice Caps Melting?, and Energy Makes Things Happen in the Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science series. He lives in Newtown, Connecticut.

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