Chomolungma Sings the Blues: Travels Round Everest

Overview

A refreshingly different portrait of the people who live in the shadows of Everest

Everest -- a mountain known all around the world and surrounded by the tragic romanticism of climbers risking everything for a dream. Although much has been written on the feats and accomplishments of these climbers, what about the people who actually live in the shadow of the mountain and the ways climbers and trekkers affect their lives? Ed Douglas spent time traveling in Nepal and Tibet, ...

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Overview

A refreshingly different portrait of the people who live in the shadows of Everest

Everest -- a mountain known all around the world and surrounded by the tragic romanticism of climbers risking everything for a dream. Although much has been written on the feats and accomplishments of these climbers, what about the people who actually live in the shadow of the mountain and the ways climbers and trekkers affect their lives? Ed Douglas spent time traveling in Nepal and Tibet, talking to politicians, environmentalists and mountaineers, and to local people who live around the mountain they call Chomolungma, Goddess Mother of the World.

This sensitive account of Douglas' travels explores the issue facing a region struggling to develop and change-issues brought on by the growing mountaineering and trekking industries, issues that go far beyond how to clear up all the piling rubbish climbers leave behind. With honesty and humor, Chomolungma Sings the Blues sheds a new and different light on the mountain and its people.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Interest in Mount Everest (called Chomolungma, or "Goddess Mother of the World," by the locals) and the surrounding high mountains of Nepal has placed enormous strain on both the physical environment and the people of the region. At any one time, thousands of foreigners are trekking and ascending the lesser peaks. Over 700 climbers have reached the summit of Everest itself, and it has become the sport of the wealthy. Permit fees run about $10,000 per person; most expeditions have base budgets beginning at $300,000. These groups, obviously well supplied, plus the many independent, low-budget travelers, leave behind massive amounts of litter and sometimes a shameful record of exploitation of their largely Sherpa porters. Douglas, a British climber and an editor of Climber magazine, reports skillfully on the two-edged sword of "adventure travel." Public libraries with books promoting trekking and climbing should balance their collections with this honest and disturbing look at its consequences.--Harold M. Otness, Southern Oregon Univ. Lib., Ashland Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780898868432
  • Publisher: Mountaineers Books, The
  • Publication date: 10/15/2001
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 5.14 (w) x 7.77 (h) x 0.64 (d)

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