Chopin At The Boundaries / Edition 1

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Overview


The complex status of Chopin in our culture--he was a native Pole and adopted Frenchman, and a male composer writing in "feminine" genres--is the subject of Jeffrey Kallberg's absorbing book. Combining social history, literary theory, musicology, and feminist thought, Chopin at the Boundaries is the first book to situate Chopin's music within the construct of his somewhat marginal sexual identity and to explore how this should figure in our understanding of his compositional methods. Through this novel approach, Kallberg reveals a new Chopin, one situated precisely where questions of gender open up into the very important question of genre.
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Editorial Reviews

Times Literary Supplement

Chopin at the Boundaries aim[s] 'to expose and partially recover aspects of Chopin's style perceived in his day to be marginal or foreign, but which today's listeners have transformed or repressed.' In this respect and in others, [it] succeed[s] brilliantly; Kallberg's scholarship is consistently of the highest caliber, his research meticulous and exhaustive, his arguments engaging.
— John Rink

Washington Times

Mr. Kallberg...[explores] connections between 'gender and genre' by way of showing Frederic Chopin's small forms and surface beauties congruent with 19th-century concepts of feminine expression. Most of the pages [of his book] are given over to fine analysis of Chopin's work. There is in particular an excellent examination of that strange end piece to Chopin's career, the F-minor Mazurka.
— Kenneth LaFave

Choice
[Kallberg's] meticulous scholarship is presented lucidly, and his acquaintance with pertinent literature of the past century and a half is impressive.
Times Literary Supplement - John Rink
Chopin at the Boundaries aim[s] 'to expose and partially recover aspects of Chopin's style perceived in his day to be marginal or foreign, but which today's listeners have transformed or repressed.' In this respect and in others, [it] succeed[s] brilliantly; Kallberg's scholarship is consistently of the highest caliber, his research meticulous and exhaustive, his arguments engaging.
Charles Rosen
Kallberg is internationally accepted as one of the most knowledgeable writers on Chopin today. This book shows that he is also the most original. It is an extremely successful attempt to open out the study of Chopin into both social criticism and the history of reception...It is certainly the most stimulating book of Chopin criticism I have ever read.
Washington Times - Kenneth Lafave
Mr. Kallberg...[explores] connections between 'gender and genre' by way of showing Frederic Chopin's small forms and surface beauties congruent with 19th-century concepts of feminine expression. Most of the pages [of his book] are given over to fine analysis of Chopin's work. There is in particular an excellent examination of that strange end piece to Chopin's career, the F-minor Mazurka.
Washington Times
Mr. Kallberg...[explores] connections between 'gender and genre' by way of showing Frederic Chopin's small forms and surface beauties congruent with 19th-century concepts of feminine expression. Most of the pages [of his book] are given over to fine analysis of Chopin's work. There is in particular an excellent examination of that strange end piece to Chopin's career, the F-minor Mazurka.
— Kenneth LaFave
Times Literary Supplement
Chopin at the Boundaries aim[s] 'to expose and partially recover aspects of Chopin's style perceived in his day to be marginal or foreign, but which today's listeners have transformed or repressed.' In this respect and in others, [it] succeed[s] brilliantly; Kallberg's scholarship is consistently of the highest caliber, his research meticulous and exhaustive, his arguments engaging.
— John Rink
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674127913
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 1/21/1998
  • Series: Convergences: Inventories of the Present
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 318
  • Product dimensions: 0.67 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 9.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Jeffrey Kallberg is Professor of Music at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Table of Contents

Preface

I. Ideology, Sex, and the Piano Miniature

The Rhetoric of Genre: Chopin's Nocturne in G Minor

The Harmony of the Tea Table: Gender and Ideology in the Piano Nocturne

Small Fairy Voices: Sex, History, and Meaning in Chopin

II. Social Constructions and the Compositional Process

Chopin's Last Style

Small "Forms": In Defense of the Prelude

III. The Musical Work as Social Process

Chopin in the Marketplace

The Chopin "Problem": Simultaneous Variants and Alternate Versions

Notes

Credits

Index

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Sand was a killer!!!,

    For instance, Aurore Dupin, pseudonym George Sand, the French novelist - later Baroness Dudevant - who wrote in masculine genres, was grotesque in her absurd ideas of love and she tortured the Polish Chopin who mainly composed in feminine styles. <BR/><BR/>Chopin must have felt her mind was a region utterly difficult to penetrate under the best of circumstances (she was six years his senior) hence the approaches he made to her daughter Solenge. <BR/><BR/>Chopin, fearing to be in the shadow of the strong willed George Sand of aristocratic lineage (through her father) and a distant relative of Louis XVI, would have none of it. Both were unhappily powerless.

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