Chord Progressions: Twelve-Bar Blues, Three-Chord Song, Eight-Bar Blues, Chord Progression, Coltrane Changes, Consecutive Fifths

Overview

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Twelve-Bar Blues, Three-Chord Song, Eight Bar Blues, Chord Progression, Consecutive Fifths, Pachelbel's Canon, Coltrane Changes, Passamezzo Moderno, Ii-V-I Turnaround, Rhythm Changes, Sixteen Bar Blues, Folia, Pitch Axis Theory, Omnibus Progression, 50s Progression, Double Tonic, Stomp Progression, Backdoor Progression, Aeolian ...

See more details below
Paperback
$15.32
BN.com price
(Save 3%)$15.84 List Price
Sending request ...

More About This Book

Overview

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Twelve-Bar Blues, Three-Chord Song, Eight Bar Blues, Chord Progression, Consecutive Fifths, Pachelbel's Canon, Coltrane Changes, Passamezzo Moderno, Ii-V-I Turnaround, Rhythm Changes, Sixteen Bar Blues, Folia, Pitch Axis Theory, Omnibus Progression, 50s Progression, Double Tonic, Stomp Progression, Backdoor Progression, Aeolian Harmony, Circle Progression, Ragtime Progression, Tadd Dameron Turnaround, Passamezzo Antico, Borrowed Chord Progression, Sensitive Female Chord Progression, Dominant Preparation, Montgomery-Ward Bridge. Excerpt: A chord progression (or harmonic progression) is a series of musical chords, or chord changes that "aims for a definite goal" of establishing (or contradicting) a tonality founded on a key, root or tonic chord. Chords and chord theory are generally known as harmony. A chord progression can be thought of as a harmonic simultaneity succession: it offers an ongoing shift of level that is essential to the music of Europe (at least since 1600), Oceania and South/West Africa. A change of chord, or "chord change", generally occurs on an accented beat, so that chord progressions may contribute significantly to the rhythm, meter and musical form of a piece, delineating bars, phrases and sections. The key note or tonic of a piece of music is called note number one, the first step of the ascending scale. Chords built on each scale degree are numbered in the same way so that, for example, in the key of C, the progression E minor - F - G can be generally described as a three - four - five progression.A chord may be built upon any note of a musical scale, therefore a seven-note scale allows seven basic chords, each degree of the scale becoming the "root" or "tonic" of its own chord. A chord built upon the note A is an A ch... More: http://booksllc.net/?id=183431

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781157592709
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 6/4/2010
  • Pages: 36
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.07 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)