Chosen Prey (Lucas Davenport Series #12)

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Overview

An art history professor and writer and cheerful pervert, James Qatar had a hobby: he took secret photographs of women and turned them into highly sexual drawings. One day, he took the hobby a step further and ... well, one thing led to another, and he had to kill her. A man in his position couldn't be too careful, after all. And you know something? He liked it.

Already faced with a welter of confusion in his personal life, Deputy Chief Lucas Davenport decides to take this case ...

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Conger, Eric (Reader) New York, NY, U.S.A. 2001 Audio Book Audio Book New (Cassette Tapes) in New (Box) jacket Brief summary of content available on request by e-mail. Abridged ... audio book on 4 cassettes. Running time 6 hours. BRAND NEW IN PLASTIC! ! Read more Show Less

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Chosen Prey (Lucas Davenport Series #12)

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Overview

An art history professor and writer and cheerful pervert, James Qatar had a hobby: he took secret photographs of women and turned them into highly sexual drawings. One day, he took the hobby a step further and ... well, one thing led to another, and he had to kill her. A man in his position couldn't be too careful, after all. And you know something? He liked it.

Already faced with a welter of confusion in his personal life, Deputy Chief Lucas Davenport decides to take this case himself, hoping that some straightforward police work will clear his head, but as the trail begins to take unexpected turns, it soon becomes clear that nothing is straightforward about this killer. The man is learning as he goes, Lucas realizes, taking great strides forward with each murder. He is becoming a monster - and Lucas may have no choice but to walk right into his lair.

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Editorial Reviews

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The Barnes & Noble Review
The Lucas Davenport thrillers have become an annual, much-anticipated phenomenon, and it's not hard to see why. Each time out, Sandford combines a variety of plot elements into a slick, furiously paced narrative that is cunningly constructed and virtually impossible to set aside. Chosen Prey, the 12th entry in this remarkably consistent series, finds the hard-edged Minnesota homicide detective spearheading yet another convoluted investigation, this one aimed at bringing down a serial killer -- and sexual psychopath -- known as the Gravedigger.

As we learn at the very outset, the Gravedigger is James Quatar, an effete, deeply disturbed art historian with a penchant for blondes who remind him of his mother. Several of these iconic blondes have served as unwitting models for James's distinctive brand of pornographic, mix-and-match computer art. And several have simply disappeared from the face of the earth. As the novel opens, the body of Qatar's most recent victim surfaces in a park on the outskirts of Minneapolis. When the park turns out to be a mass graveyard containing eight more victims -- all blonde, all with an affinity for the visual arts -- a statewide manhunt ensues.

Cutting crisply back and forth between the demented perspective of James Qatar and the increasingly frantic perspective of the Minneapolis/St. Paul police departments, Chosen Prey offers a satisfying demonstration of Sandford's by now familiar virtues: brisk, no-frills prose, pungent dialogue, authoritative scene-setting, and a vivid gallery of characters from both sides of the law. These include Davenport himself, Detective Sergeant Marcy Sherrill (who is just returning to action after her near-fatal wounding in Easy Prey), and Davenport's on-again, off-again girlfriend, Dr. Weather Karkinnen, who has now assumed a dominant role in Lucas's always complicated domestic life. Effective new characters include the Gravedigger himself, James Qatar; his voyeuristic paramour (and prospective victim), Ellen Barstad; and Terry Marshall, a veteran law enforcement officer with an intensely personal stake in the investigation.

Chosen Prey easily meets the rigorous standards of its predecessors, and will no doubt provide Sandford's legion of fans with an irresistible, high-adrenaline good time. (Bill Sheehan)

Bill Sheehan reviews horror, suspense, and science fiction for Cemetery Dance, The New York Review of Science Fiction, and other publications. His book-length critical study of the fiction of Peter Straub, At the Foot of the Story Tree, has been published by Subterranean Press .

USA Today
Surprises await around every bend...a very satisfying ride.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The 13th title in the Prey series (Easy Prey, etc.) has wealthy Minneapolis Deputy Police Chief Lucas Davenport in up to his Porsche-driving fingertips. Lucas is trying to track an elusive serial killer while reuniting with former fianc e Weather Karkinnen who after a couple of years' estrangement following her narrow escape from a crazy biker in one of Lucas's former cases has suddenly decided she wants to have his baby. Weather is a formidable distraction, but the killer revealed to readers from the beginning as James Qatar, a suave professor of art history with a yen for strangulation proves to require even more attention. Soon after the body of a young blonde is found in a partially excavated grave on a remote wilderness hillside, a deputy sheriff from backwater Wisconsin shows up with a file containing case histories of several women reported missing in Wisconsin and Minnesota over a nine-year period. Fearing the worst, Lucas orders the hillside surveyed; subsequent excavation uncovers seven more bodies. The art world connections of some of the victims and the discovery of pornographic drawings suggests a link to the art community around the local Catholic university. As the net tightens, the usually coolheaded Qatar, already plotting the fate of a daring fabric artist in cahoots with the police, gradually loses control. With Lucas and his team watching his every move, he eludes surveillance and carries out a final desperate attack. Sandford is in top form here, his wry humor and his development of Lucas's combative, affectionate relationship with Weather lighting up the dark of another grisly investigation. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Minneapolis deputy police chief Lucas Davenport is trying to track an elusive serial killer and reunite with former fianc e Weather Karkinnen in Sandford's latest novel. Listeners are introduced to James Qatar, a jolly art history professor with strangulation as a hobby. Then the bodies start to pile up. Lucas finds a local pornographic photography ring that publishes its work on the Internet. The routine investigation gathers steam toward the second half of the tale, as Lucas goes after Qatar. This may not be Sandford's best story, but humor and character development help make this mediocre thriller interesting. The work contains mature subject matter and language but is entertaining in both the abridged and unabridged versions. Richard Ferrone's reading of the unabridged set is acceptable, evoking the atmosphere of a 1930s detective story, but Eric Conger's narration of the abridged cassettes and CDs puts the ideal voices to Lucas, his colleagues, friends, and adversaries. Recommended. Denise A. Garofalo, Mid-Hudson Lib. Syst., Poughkeepsie, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780399147586
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/7/2001
  • Series: Lucas Davenport Series , #12
  • Format: Cassette
  • Edition description: Abridged, 4 Cassettes
  • Pages: 4
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 7.10 (h) x 1.14 (d)

Meet the Author

John Sandford is the author of twenty-two Prey novels, most recently Stolen Prey; the Virgil Flowers novels, most recently Shock Wave; and six other books. He lives in Minnesota.

Biography

John Camp (better known to readers as thrillmeister John Sandford) began his career as a journalist -- first as a crime reporter for The Miami Herald, then as a general reporter, columnist, and features writer for the Saint Paul Pioneer Press & Dispatch. In 1986, he won the Pulitzer Prize for "Life on the Land: An American Farm Family," a five-part series examining the farm crisis in southwest Minnesota.

Camp's interests turned to fiction in the mid-1980s, and he took time off to write two novels which were ultimately accepted for publication: The Fool's Run, a techno-thriller featuring a complex con man known as Kidd, and Rules of Prey, a police procedural starring maverick Minneapolis detective Lucas Davenport. When both books were scheduled (by different publishers) to be released three months apart in 1989, Camp was persuaded to adopt a pseudonym for one. He chose his paternal grandmother's maiden name, "Sandford" for Rules of Prey, and the nom de plume has remained attached to all the books in the series.

Less Dick Tracy than Dirty Harry, hard-boiled, iconoclastic Lucas Davenport is a composite of the cops Camp met while working the crime beat as a reporter. Intelligent and street smart, Davenport is also manipulative and not above bending the rules to get results. And although he has mellowed over time (something of a skirt chaser in his youth, he is now married with children), he remains one of the edgiest and most popular protagonists in detective fiction. Fans keep returning to the Prey books for their intelligently hatched plots, high-octane pacing, and deft, fully human characterizations.

From time to time, Camp strays from his bestselling series for standalone thrillers (The Night Crew, Dead Watch), and in 2007 he introduced a new series hero, Virgil Flowers of the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, who debuted in Dark of the Moon. Although he is no longer a full-time journalist, Camp contributes occasional articles and book reviews to various publications. He is also a passionate archaeologist and has worked at a number of digs, mainly in Israel.

Good To Know

Don't confuse John Sandford with John Sanford -- it's one of Sandford's pet peeves. Sanford (without the "d") is a Christian philosophy writer.

The Sandford pseudonym has caused a few problems for Camp in the past. At an airport once, his ticket was reserved under Sandford, while all of his identification, of course, had the name Camp. Luckily, he had one of his novels with him, and thanks to the book jacket photo, he was able to convince airport security to let him on the plane.

The books in Camp's less successful Kidd series (The Fool's Run, The Empress File, The Devil's Code, and The Hanged Man's Song) have been re-released under the Sandford pseudonym.

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    1. Also Known As:
      John Roswell Camp
    2. Hometown:
      St. Paul, Minnesota
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 23, 1944
    2. Place of Birth:
      Cedar Rapids, Iowa
    1. Education:
      State University of Iowa, Iowa City: B.A., American History; M.A., Journalism
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Chosen Prey Chapter 1

1.

James Qatar dropped his feet over the edge of the bed and rubbed the back of his neck, a momentary veil of depression falling upon him. He was sitting naked on the rumpled sheets, the smell of sex lingering like a rude perfume. He could hear Ellen Barstad in the kitchen. She'd turned on the radio she kept by the sink, and "Cinnamon Girl" bubbled through the small rooms. Dishes tinkled against cups, fingernail scratches through the melody of the song.

"Cinnamon Girl" wasn't right for this day, for this time, for what was about to happen. If he were to have music, he thought, maybe Shostakovich, a few measures from the Lyric Waltz in Jazz Suite Number 2. Something sweet, yet pensive, with a taste of tragedy; Qatar was an intellectual, and he knew his music.

He stood up, wobbled into the bathroom, flushed the Trojan in the toilet, washed perfunctorily, and studied himself in the mirror above the sink. Great eyes, he thought, suitably deep-set for a man of intellect. A good nose, trim, not fleshy. His pointed chin made his face into an oval, a reflection of sensitivity. He was admiring the image when his eyes drifted to the side of his nose: a whole series of small dark hairs were emerging from the line where his nose met his cheek. He hated that.

He found a set of tweezers in the medicine cabinet and carefully tweezed them away, then took a couple of hairs from the bridge of his nose, between his eyebrows. Checked his ears. His ears were okay. The tweezers were pretty good, he thought: you didn't find tweezers like this every day. He'd take them with him-she wouldn't miss them.

Now. Where was he?

Ah. Barstad. He had to stay focused. He went back to the bedroom, put the tweezers in a jacket pocket, dressed, put on his shoes, then returned to the bathroom to check his hair. Just a touch with the comb. When he was satisfied, he rolled out twenty feet of toilet paper and wiped everything he might have touched in the bedroom and bathroom. The police would be coming around sooner or later.

He hummed as he worked, nothing intricate: Bach, maybe. When he'd finished cleaning up, he threw the toilet paper into the toilet, pressed the handle with his knuckles, and watched it flush.

 

Ellen Barstad heard the toilet flush a second time and wondered what was keeping him. All this toilet flushing was less than romantic; she needed some romance. Romance, she thought, and a little decent sex. James Qatar had been a severe disappointment, as had been all of the few lovers in her life. All eager to get aboard and pound away; none much concerned with her, though they said they were.

"That was really great, Ellen, you're great-pass me that beer, will ya? Ya got great tits, did I tell you that...?"

Her love life to this point-three men, six years-had been a pale reflection of the ecstasies described in her books. So far, she felt more like a sausage-making machine than the lover in the Song of Solomon: Your breasts are like two fawns, like twin fawns of a gazelle that browse among the lilies. Until the day breaks and the shadows flee, I will go to the mountain of myrrh and to the hill of incense. All beautiful you are, my darling, there is no flaw in you."

Where was that? Huh? Where was it? That's what she wanted. Somebody to climb her mountain of myrrh.

James Qatar might not look like much, she thought, but there was a sensual quality in his eyes, and a hovering cruelty that she found intriguing. She'd never been pushy, had never pushed anything in her life. But as she stood with her hands in the dishwater, she decided to push this. If she didn't, what was the point?

Time was passing-with her youth.

Barstad was a fabric artist who did some weaving, but mostly made quilts. She couldn't make a living at it yet, but her quilting income was increasing month by month, and in another year or two she might be able to quit her day job.

She lived illegally in a storefront in a Minneapolis warehouse district. The front of the space was an open bay, full of quilting frames and material bins. The back she'd built herself, with salvaged drywall and two-by-fours: She'd enclosed the toilet and divided the rest of the space into bedroom, sitting area, and kitchen. The kitchen amounted to a tabletop electric stove and a fifties refrigerator, with a bunch of old doors mounted on sawhorses as countertops. And it was all just fine for an artist in her twenties, with bigger things ahead. . . .

Like great sex, she thought-if he'd ever get out of the bathroom.

 

The rope was in his jacket, balled up. Qatar took it out and pulled his hand down the length of it, as though to strip away its history. Eighteen inches long, it had begun life as the starter rope on a Mercury outboard motor-one end still had the rubber pull-handle. The rope had been with him, he thought, for almost half his life. When he'd eliminated the tangles, he coiled it neatly around the fingers of his left hand, slipped the coil off his fingers, and pushed it carefully into his hip pocket. Old friend.

Barstad had been a brutal disappointment. She'd been nothing like her images had suggested she'd be. She'd been absolutely white-bread, nothing but spread-your-legs-and-close-your-eyes. He couldn't continue with a woman like that.

The postcoital depression began leaking away, to be replaced by the half-forgotten killing mood-a fitful state, combining a blue, close-focused excitement with a scratchy, unpleasant fear. He picked up his jacket and carried it into the living room, a space just big enough for a couch and coffee table, hung it neatly on the back of a wooden rocking chair, and walked to the corner of the makeshift kitchen.

The kitchen smelled a little of chicken soup, a little of seasoned salt, a little of cut celery, all pulled together by the hum of the refrigerator and the sound of the radio. Barstad was there, with both hands in dishwater. She was absently mouthing the words to a soft-rock tune that Qatar didn't recognize, and moving her body with it in that self-conscious, upper-Midwest way.

Barstad had honey-blond hair and blue eyes under pale, almost white eyebrows. She dressed down, in Minnesota fashion, in earth-colored shifts, turtlenecks, dark tights, and clunky shoes. The church-mouse clothes did not completely conceal an excellent body, created by her Scandinavian genes and toned by compulsive bicycle-riding. All wasted on her, Qatar thought. He stepped into the kitchen, and she saw him and smiled shyly. "How are you?" she asked.

"Wonderful," he said, twinkling at her, the rope pressing in his hip pocket. She'd known the sex hadn't been that good-that's why she'd fled to her dishes. He bent forward, his hands at her waist, and kissed her on the neck. She smelled like yellow Dial soap. "Absolutely the best."

"I hope it will get better," she said, blushing. She had a sponge in her hand. "I know it wasn't everything you expected. . . ."

"You are such a pretty woman," he said. He touched the side of her neck, cooing at her. "Such a pretty woman."

He pushed his hips against her, and she moved her butt back against him. "And you are such a liar," she said. She was not good at small talk. "But keep it up."

"Mmmm." The rope was in his hand.

His fingers fit over the T of the handle; he would loop it over her chin, he thought, so that it wouldn't get hung up by the turtleneck. He would have to pull her over, he thought; get a foot wedged behind hers and jerk hard, backward and down, then hang her over the floor, so that her own weight would strangle her. Had to watch for fingernails, and to control the attitude of her body with his knees. Fingernails were like knives. He turned one foot to block her heels, so that she would trip over it when she went down.

Careful here, he thought. No mistakes now.

 

"I know that wasn't too great," she said, not looking back at him. A pink flush crawled up her neck, but she continued, doggedly, "I haven't had that much experience, and the men . . . weren't very . . . good." She was struggling with the words. This was hard. "You could show me a lot about sex. I'd like to know. I really would. I'd like to know everything. If we could find a way to talk about it without being too, you know, embarrassed about it."

 

She derailed him. He'd been one second from taking her, and her words barely penetrated the killing fog. But they got through.

She wanted what? To learn about sex, a lot about sex? The idea was an erotic slap in the face, like something from a bad pornographic film, where the housewife asks the plumber to show her how to . . .

He stood frozen for a moment, then she half-turned and gave him the shy, sexy smile that had attracted him in the first place. Qatar pushed against her again and fumbled the rope back into his hip pocket.

"I think we could work something out," he said, his voice thick. And he thought, silently amused: Talk dirty-save your life.

—From Chosen Prey by John Sanford. (c) May 2001, G. P. Putnam's Sons, used by permission.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 90 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(47)

4 Star

(27)

3 Star

(11)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(2)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 90 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2012

    I esp liked "Chosen Prey" for a variety of reasons ...

    I esp liked "Chosen Prey" for a variety of reasons - not the least of which was the always enjoyable Sanford writing style & story construction. However, "Chosen", more than any other of the prey series thusfar, revealed in greater depth: 1) The complex nature of law enforcement & the legal process & 2) A more personal side of its recurring cast of characters. As an added bonus, we also got glimpses of the direction Lucas will be taking in his personal & "business" life.

    I'm already on to the next installment & want to re-emphasize that the best reading experience for the prey series is to read them in order.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2012

    BIG tumbs up

    The last book in the series i think was just bad and i was almost going to stop with the series for fear that the rest of the series was going to be like that but i was glad when my friend told me that this book was so much better

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 24, 2010

    A must Read

    Davenport is an amazing character. For anyone loving murder mystery, this is a great pick!! I recommend srating form the first in the series to get the full effect of Davenport and his wild life!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2001

    Excellent Prey Book

    This, along with the rest of the 'Prey' books, was excellent. It was nice to see Lucas back with Weather, and I think this is the first book where I have not seen him involved with more than one woman! REFRESHING..... The only dissapointment was, I don't want to wait for the next book to find out if Weather is pregnant!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2012

    John Sanford knocks a homerun!!!

    Sanford really knocks it out of the park on this one. A really great read, with a fasinateing ending.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2013

    Itt.yi

    Gjd . ?myr ..t . i .te .jfh

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  • Posted December 2, 2012

    My favorite LD novel because it depicts a criminal as being happ

    My favorite LD novel because it depicts a criminal as being happily aware he is a homicidal maniac. The circling Davenport bothers the villain but that doesn't stop him. A nattily dressed neat freak mass murderer haunts the pages of this novel. Sandford's character construction is flawless in this one and in my opinion deserving of as the professor would say "High Marks".

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  • Posted February 19, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Back on Track

    Easy Prey, #11 in the series, was just not very good. With Chosen Prey, Sandford returns to what this series is all about - great characters, great plot, some heavy duty evil and serious twists and turns along the way. This is one of the best in the entire Prey Series and, while the ending becomes predictable towards the last few chapters, it is still a thrill ride. You can probably read any of the books as "stand alones" but reading them in order adds depth to the characters and story lines.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2008

    What a bust

    Its not all too often that while reading a book that I decide what will happen to a point based on how an author works a character. While reading this book it was all to clear what the outcome would be and I was 99% right with about 119 pages left. That is too bad, this book started out really good. Had a nice pace going until mid-way through and it started to unravel page by page. Sandford seems to have hit a wall with this Prey series in my opinion. I have liked just about all of them but I have noticed a small decline in his writing, he is still good at what he does but maybe hes becoming bored with it himself. One other thing I have noticed is alot of time the same things are said in each book. I am not talking about a desciption of a character such as how Lucas looks or an item he is describing. Its more of a chain of words he uses alot, every book it seems. Just something personal I dont like is all but other than that Sandford is a good read but this book is lacking, you will figure it out before you get to heavy into it and that takes all the fun away from it.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2006

    Arranged Murders

    Chosen Prey's, by John Sandford, characters are real as is the plot of the mystery. Although one can see where Mr. Sandford is going, it's fun to read/listen to how he gets there. Eric Conger who narrated the audio is very good. I recommed this book/cd/cassette to all mystery fans. Kit

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2003

    not my cup of tea

    this was my first and probably last book ill read by sanford. im mainly in to horror and thriller writers. when i read the description of the book i thought it would be good reading but after the first chapter which was the best part of the book it got into the long boring investigation of the detective and not enough was writen about the killer. if you like perry mason and murder she wrote then go for it. Me ill stick to dean koonze S. king John Saul Richard layman Bentley little.michael prescott to name a few. Sanford is too tame for my blood and booring.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2002

    Gripping, thrilling, couldn't wait to turn the page!

    Very well-written by Sandford! Lots of twists and turns to add to the exciting, almost eerie, plot. This book kept my undivided attention and had me glued to the pages and unsuspecting turn-of-events. I highly recommend this title to anyone who enjoys suspense and the twisted mind of a murderer.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2002

    Not great but not bad

    I think this book was very intresting with the different points of view. At times it was hard to keep track of who was who but overall it was a very thrilling book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2002

    Another great Sandford novel

    I found this book another fast paced read. I have loved every one of his books but I would recommend that you begin with the first one he wrote Rules Of Prey. Reason being that the characters develope along the series and its easier to understand who is who.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2002

    Language unnecessary

    This was the first book I have ever read by this author, and it will definately be the last. Sure, the story was great...my type of read, except for the fact that it had the most awful language in it that I have ever read!!!!!! The story would have been a lot better if it didn't have ' G.D.' and ' F' about 5 times on every page. I understand some language to set the atmosphere and so on, but THAT WAS RIDICULOUS!!!!!!!!!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2002

    Chosen Prey Not First Choice of Prey Series

    If you're going to read the Prey Series, start with the first book Rules of Prey. By the time you reach Easy Prey and Chosen Prey, the twelfth and thirteenth books in the series, you will be a prey aficionado and able to better appreciate John Sandford's prolific prescience peddling prey.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2001

    FANTASTIC SUSPENSE

    I listened to this book on CD during a long road trip. It made the time pass SO FAST! I've read all of his books, and each book is better than the last!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2001

    Lucas Davenport rides again

    Ihave read the whole prey series up to date! rules of prey was the first! and chosen prey was the last and until sandford creates another prey novel i will read no other! his kidd novels are also great reading! ive read everything he has to offer under the name sandford and all his books have glue on the cover 'they are hard to put down'!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2001

    Davenport is great!!

    This book kept me on the edge of my seat. I could not put in down. Again, the author has done a great job!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2001

    NICE JOB

    The first of Mr. Sanford's books I have read and I am impressed. Good pacing and fun story. Will read more.

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