Christian Apologetics in the Postmodern World

Overview

Evangelicals are beginning to provide analyses of our postmodern society, but little has been done to suggest an effective apologetic strategy for reaching a culture that is pluralistic, consumer-oriented, and infatuated with managerial and therapeutic approaches to life. This, then, is the first book to address that vital task.

In these pages some of evangelicalism's most stimulating thinkers consider three possible apologetic responses to postmodernity. William Lane Craig ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (15) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $17.61   
  • Used (12) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Evangelicals are beginning to provide analyses of our postmodern society, but little has been done to suggest an effective apologetic strategy for reaching a culture that is pluralistic, consumer-oriented, and infatuated with managerial and therapeutic approaches to life. This, then, is the first book to address that vital task.

In these pages some of evangelicalism's most stimulating thinkers consider three possible apologetic responses to postmodernity. William Lane Craig argues that traditional evidentialist apologetics remains viable and preferable. Roger Lundin, Nicola Creegan and James Sire find the postmodern critique of Christianity and Western culture more challenging, but reject central features of it. Philip Kenneson, Brian Walsh and J. Richard Middleton, on the other hand, argue that key aspects of postmodernity can be appropriated to defend orthodox Christianity.

An essential feature are trenchent chapters by Ronald Clifton Potter, Dennis Hollinger and Douglas Webster considering issues facing the local church in light of postmodernity. The volumes editors and John Stackhouse also add important introductory essays that orient the reader to postmodernity and various apologetic strategies.

All this makes for a book indispensable for theologians, a wide range of students and reflective pastors.

Evangelicals are beginning to provide analyses of our postmodern society, but little has been done to suggest an effective apologetic strategy for reaching a culture that is pluralistic, consumer-oriented and infatuated with managerial and therapeutic approaches to life. This, then, is the first book to address that vital task.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780830818600
  • Publisher: InterVarsity Press
  • Publication date: 4/17/1995
  • Pages: 238
  • Product dimensions: 6.01 (w) x 8.97 (h) x 0.71 (d)

Meet the Author

Until his death in 2000, Phillips (Ph.D., Vanderbilt University) was associate professor of historical and systematic theology at Wheaton College, where he was instrumental in starting and organizing the annual Wheaton College Theology Conference. Besides coediting several scholarly books, he was coauthor (with Dennis L. Okholm) of Welcome to the Family: An Introduction to Evangelical Christianity.

Okholm (Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary) teaches in the department of theology and philosophy at Haggard School of Theology, Azusa Pacific University. Previously he was associate professor of theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois.

He is also an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA), and an oblate of a Benedictine monastery (Blue Cloud Abbey, SD). He has coauthored and coedited several books, including two collections of papers presented at the annual Wheaton Theology Conference and Welcome to the Family: An Introduction to Evangelical Christianity (all in partnership with Timothy R. Phillips).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Part I Definitions: Apologetics and Postmodernity
1. IntroductionTimothy R. Phillips and Dennis Okholm
2. The Pragmatics of PostmodernityRoger Lundin
3. From Architecture to Argument: Historic Resources for Christian ApologeticsJohn G. Stackhouse Jr.Part II The Apologetics of Modernity
4. Schleiermacher as Apologist: Reclaiming the Father of Modern TheologyNicola Hoggard Creegan
5. Politically Incorrect SalvationWilliam Lane CraigPart III Apologetics Between Modernity and Postmodernity
6. On Being a Fool for Christ and an Idiot for Nobody: Logocentricity and PostmodernityJames W. SirePart IV The Apologetics of Postmodernity
7. Facing the Postmodern Scalpel: Can the Christian Faith Withstand Deconstruction?J. Richard Middleton and Brian J. Walsh
8. There's No Such Thing as Objective Truth, and It's a Good Thing, TooPhilip D. KennesonPart V The Church in a Postmodern Setting
9. Christian Apologetics in the African-American GrainRonald Potter
10. The Church as Apologetic: A Sociology of Knowledge PerspectiveDennis Hollinger
11. Evangelizing the ChurchDouglas Webster
Notes
Bibliography
Name Index
Subject Index
List of Contributors
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)