Christian Doctrine / Edition 1

Christian Doctrine / Edition 1

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by Shirley C. Guthrie
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0664253687

ISBN-13: 9780664253684

Pub. Date: 07/28/1994

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

Christian Doctrine has introduced thousands of laity, students, and theologians to the tenets of the Christian faith. This edition reflects changes in the church and society since the publication of the first edition and takes into account new works in Reformed theology, gender references in the Bible, racism, pluralism, ecological developments, and

Overview

Christian Doctrine has introduced thousands of laity, students, and theologians to the tenets of the Christian faith. This edition reflects changes in the church and society since the publication of the first edition and takes into account new works in Reformed theology, gender references in the Bible, racism, pluralism, ecological developments, and liberation theologies.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780664253684
Publisher:
Westminster John Knox Press
Publication date:
07/28/1994
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
434
Sales rank:
480,203
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.30(d)

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Christian Doctrine 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are looking for a book that presents in a clear, lucid, and readable manner the nuances of of modern reformed theology, this is it! Guthrie uses the apostles creed as a basis for discussing christian theology in general and reformed theology in particular. Each section of the apostles creed is used as a basis for presenting a systematic theology from a reformed perspective. The book begins with a detailed account of God, his attributes and how we know them. One chapter contains an excellent summary of the arguments for and against a natural theology. However, Guthrie cogently argues for the view that we ultimately must start with God's revelation of himself in Jesus. Guthrie, like Barth, is not sympathetic to the view that very much can be known about God from abstract philosophical reasoning about the natural world. Personally, I was most impressed with his discussion of predestination. His discussion of this doctrine is evenhanded and thorough. For those, like me, who find this to be one of the most troubling aspects of traditional reformed theology, Guthrie's discussion was very helpful. I also enjoyed his chapters on the trinity and the resurrection. He is strongly trinitarian and basically traditional in his understanding of the resurrection. His discussion of the resurrection in terms of what it means for us today and continues to mean is excellent. I strongly recommend this book to anyone seriously interested in christian theology, especially from a protestant point of view. It combines two qualities rare in modern theology, clarity and depth.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago