×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Christian Nation
     

Christian Nation

4.6 8
by Frederic C. Rich
 

See All Formats & Editions

“They said what they would do, and we did not listen. Then they did what they said they would do.”
So ends the first chapter of this brilliantly readable counterfactual novel, reminding us that America’s Christian fundamentalists have been consistently clear about their vision for a "Christian Nation" and dead serious about acquiring the

Overview

“They said what they would do, and we did not listen. Then they did what they said they would do.”
So ends the first chapter of this brilliantly readable counterfactual novel, reminding us that America’s Christian fundamentalists have been consistently clear about their vision for a "Christian Nation" and dead serious about acquiring the political power to achieve it. When President McCain dies and Sarah Palin becomes president, the reader, along with the nation, stumbles down a terrifyingly credible path toward theocracy, realizing too late that the Christian right meant precisely what it said.
In the spirit of Philip Roth’s The Plot Against America, one of America’s foremost lawyers lays out in chilling detail what such a future might look like: constitutional protections dismantled; all aspects of life dominated by an authoritarian law called “The Blessing,” enforced by a totally integrated digital world known as the "Purity Web." Readers will find themselves haunted by the questions the narrator struggles to answer in this fictional memoir: "What happened, why did it happen, how could it have happened?"

Editorial Reviews

Patrick Gavin - Politico
“Christian Nation is a new novel from lawyer Fred Rich that wonders what would happen if the Republican ticket won in 2008. But Rich goes even further than that, plotting a would-be Palin presidency after McCain passes away in the novel. And although it’s fiction, Rich is dead serious about what a Palin presidency would mean for the country. As the title suggest, Rich is concerned about how religious extremists on the right could upend society.”
Robert Burke Warren - Hudson Valley Chronogram
“Frederic C. Rich’s gripping novel Christian Nation straddles the line between speculative fiction and passionate indictment of today’s Christian Right.”
the Rev. Barry W. Lynn
“The scariest thing aboutChristian Nationis that it’s so plausible. No violent revolution, no blood in the streets, is necessary for Americans to lose their freedoms—just a failure to defend the liberties that we often take for granted.”
Nadine Strossen
“This riveting novel should join Sinclair Lewis’s It Can Happen Here as an American classic…Please, read this book and then pass it on to six other people, making it into a chain letter for liberty.”
Rev. Dr. James A. Kowalski
“Rich’s Christian Nation is more than a 'what if'—as the 'theocratic program' unfolds our usual 'So what?' regarding fundamentalism of any variety becomes the real danger. Pay attention. What's at stake is the heart and soul of American democracy.”
Library Journal
Distinguished lawyer Rich skips the briefs and uses fiction to consider what Christian fundamentalists really mean when they say they want a Christian nation. Here, President McCain has died, and Sarah Palin rules the nation, moving it toward theocracy as constitutional rights are summarily abandoned. Not escapist reading, though there will be plenty of suspense.
Kirkus Reviews
Could a Sarah Palin presidency spark a faith-based civil war in America? You betcha, according to Rich's debut novel. The book is narrated by Greg, who, in 2029, is recalling the country's grim fate after John McCain bested Barack Obama in the 2008 election. When McCain dies shortly after taking office, Palin becomes the willing puppet of Christian dominionists--religious zealots who insist on making the United States a Christian nation, home-schooling their children into soldiers for Christ. Dominionism is real, as Greg's college friend Sanjay explains; certain that Palin's God-themed rhetoric will undo individual rights, Sanjay starts a nonprofit called Theocracy Watch and ultimately hires Greg, a lawyer, to help fight right-wing efforts. Rich is a lawyer himself, and his book is as much a law-driven polemic as it is a work of fiction, but its tone is fairly cool considering. Though Rich describes President Sarah Palin as badly out of her depth, he takes her ascension to power seriously; it opens the door for her successor, Steve Jordan, to implement as the law of the land a 50-article "Blessing" that bans homosexuality, abortion and labor unions, restricts nonevangelical worship and seats only Christian federal judges. Michael Bloomberg (as New York's governor) leads a blue-state resistance, but it's all for naught: By 2018, Federal bombs are dropping on the Castro, and dissidents are herded into re-education camps. If Rich's determination to equate evangelical political power with the Nazis seems overstated, he shrewdly shows how a few legal measures, a bad recession and a terrorist attack can unravel the liberties many take for granted. In that regard, it's an inheritor to Sinclair Lewis' 1935 novel, It Can't Happen Here, which imagined America under totalitarianism, though Palin is as likely to claim federal power now as Huey Long was then. Dystopian, wonkish fun for the Maddow set.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393240115
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
07/01/2013
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
907,226
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.30(d)

Videos

Meet the Author

Frederic C. Rich, an eminent international corporate lawyer and environmental leader, is the author of the dystopian political novel Christian Nation. He lives in Manhattan and the Hudson Valley of New York.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Christian Nation: A Novel 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Terribly realistic in its possibility; simply the most frightening book since 1984.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Entertaining and scary. I had to keep reminding myself this is a novel. Mr. Rich uses just the right amount of fact and fiction to make one feel: This could really happen !
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is qn engaging, and disturbing, "what if" tale and like all such stories is meant to serve as a warming Many yeats ago, Orson ScottCard wrote a short story warning of what would happen if communists came to power inthe US This novel iw in many ways the successor to that story long ago we may have had to feat communism; today we should fear the far right
JoeCA More than 1 year ago
An important book, outlining a terrible possible future if the Christian right ideologists ever get their way in this country.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago