Christian Science (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

Christian Science (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

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by Mark Twain
     
 

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Mark Twain’s fear that Christian Science would control the American government within thirty years persuaded him to write this clever yet cutting piece on Christian Science and its founder Mary Baker Eddy. Twain focuses on the negative aspects of Eddy: her hunger for money and power, her self-dedication, and incoherent writing.

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Overview


Mark Twain’s fear that Christian Science would control the American government within thirty years persuaded him to write this clever yet cutting piece on Christian Science and its founder Mary Baker Eddy. Twain focuses on the negative aspects of Eddy: her hunger for money and power, her self-dedication, and incoherent writing.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411435629
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
02/08/2011
Series:
Barnes & Noble Digital Library
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
384
File size:
279 KB

Meet the Author


Mark Twain (1835–1910), born Samuel Clemens, is said to be America’s greatest humorist. William Faulkner called him the father of American literature. Ernest Hemmingway added, “all modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain.” He was referring to Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
November 30, 1835
Date of Death:
April 21, 1910
Place of Birth:
Florida, Missouri
Place of Death:
Redding, Connecticut

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Christian Science 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was a big dissapointment. It was extremely repetitive. All the information and commentary could have easily been condensed to 50 pages. As a result, I found it to be a very boring read. The main body of the book is nothing more than Twain bashing the religion and its founder, which it seems was fueled by personal tragedies in Twains life. It was very pessimistic and one-sided. However, I found Appendix D to be very insightful. It conveys a deeply spiritual side of Twain. I found his thoughts on prayer to be deeply moving, and this was the only reason I gave it three stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago