A Christmas Carol

Overview

One of the best-loved and most quoted stories of "the man who invented Christmas"-English writer Charles Dickens-A Christmas Carol debuted in 1843 and has touched millions of hearts since. Cruel miser Ebeneezer Scrooge has never met a shilling he doesn't like. . .and hardly a man he does. And he hates Christmas most of all. When Scrooge is visited by his old partner, Jacob Marley, and the ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present, and Christmas Yet to Come, he learns eternal lessons of charity, kindness, and ...
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New York, NY 2001 Hard cover New in new dust jacket. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 80 p. Contains: Illustrations. Audience: Children/juvenile. Signed by Morrissey

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Overview

One of the best-loved and most quoted stories of "the man who invented Christmas"-English writer Charles Dickens-A Christmas Carol debuted in 1843 and has touched millions of hearts since. Cruel miser Ebeneezer Scrooge has never met a shilling he doesn't like. . .and hardly a man he does. And he hates Christmas most of all. When Scrooge is visited by his old partner, Jacob Marley, and the ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present, and Christmas Yet to Come, he learns eternal lessons of charity, kindness, and goodwill. Experience a true Victorian Christmas!

A miser learns the true meaning of Christmas when three ghostly visitors review his past and foretell his future.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

A Christmas Carol has been made into so many films, plays, television shows, and even operas and graphic novels that it is sometimes difficult to remember that its purest form is the novel that Charles Dickens wrote in the early 1840s and published with the title "A Christmas Carol in Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas." The original is no mere literary antique; it displays its author's talent for rendering vivid character portraits even as he dispenses his modern sense of social justice. This Penguin Christmas Classic hardcover presents this classic in full trimmings as a low price.

Publishers Weekly
This reissued recording of Stewart's touted Broadway performance might prove to be the enduring interpretation of Dickens's beloved tale of the miserly Ebenezer Scrooge and the ghosts of past, present, and future who catalyze his transformation. In a production stripped of sound effects, Stewart's theatrical talents take center stage. Reading with a voice that it is at once commanding and fragile, he creates a Scrooge of unexpected complexity and pathos. A spare and dazzling listen that might be the best rendition of the classic since the 1951 Alistair Sim production. (Nov.)
School Library Journal
Gr 3 Up–Dickens’s cautionary tale of an embittered, stingy old man learning to be a happier, more giving person thanks to the intervention of four ghosts has long been fodder for holiday collections. From its stark opening spread (“MARLEY WAS DEAD”) to the final one with its much more cheerful winter scene, this year’s version, illustrated in Helquist’s darkly comic style, is one of the best. Some of that credit must go to Greenhut, who provided the abridgment. Sacrificing none of Dickens’s rich language, this retelling reads beautifully. The artist uses watercolor, pencil, and pastel to create cinematic artwork that contains amusing details; additionally, there are a number of pen-and-ink vignettes that help set the scenes. A winning combination of sparkling prose and exciting art.–Mara Alpert, Los Angeles Public Library
Sunday Express
A sure-fire tear-jerker. At one public reading by Dickens in Boston, there were 'so many pocket handkerchiefs it looked as if a snowstorm had gotten into the hall.
Times
It has it all: a spooky ghost story, a heartwarming redemption, and a great plot with a satisfyingly ending.
From the Publisher

"Pulp! Classics are really neat editions . . . . The text is exactly what we're familiar with—the packaging is in line with those tawdry paperbacks of yore: Lurid art, washed out colors, and, most importantly, pithy taglines." —On Our Minds, the official blog of Scholastic, Inc. 

"We immediately fell in love with these awesome wintage-style redesigns of classic novels." —Flavorwire

The Horn Book
“A smooth abridgment. The illustrations are rich and lush.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060285777
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/1/2001
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Pages: 80
  • Age range: 6 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.40 (w) x 11.35 (h) x 0.47 (d)

Meet the Author

Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens (February 7, 1812 - June 9, 1870) was an English writer who wrote over twenty novels, all of which are still read today, and which include famous books such as Oliver Twist and Great Expectations. A Christmas Carol, first published in 1843, was an instant success.

Biography

Born on February 7, 1812, Charles Dickens was the second of eight children in a family burdened with financial troubles. Despite difficult early years, he became the most successful British writer of the Victorian age.

In 1824, young Charles was withdrawn from school and forced to work at a boot-blacking factory when his improvident father, accompanied by his mother and siblings, was sentenced to three months in a debtor's prison. Once they were released, Charles attended a private school for three years. The young man then became a solicitor's clerk, mastered shorthand, and before long was employed as a Parliamentary reporter. When he was in his early twenties, Dickens began to publish stories and sketches of London life in a variety of periodicals.

It was the publication of Pickwick Papers (1836-1837) that catapulted the twenty-five-year-old author to national renown. Dickens wrote with unequaled speed and often worked on several novels at a time, publishing them first in monthly installments and then as books. His early novels Oliver Twist (1837-1838), Nicholas Nickleby (1838-1839), The Old Curiosity Shop (1840-1841), and A Christmas Carol (1843) solidified his enormous, ongoing popularity. As Dickens matured, his social criticism became increasingly biting, his humor dark, and his view of poverty darker still. David Copperfield (1849-1850), Bleak House (1852-1853), Hard Times (1854), A Tale of Two Cities (1859), Great Expectations (1860-1861), and Our Mutual Friend (1864-1865) are the great works of his masterful and prolific period.

In 1858 Dickens's twenty-three-year marriage to Catherine Hogarth dissolved when he fell in love with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. The last years of his life were filled with intense activity: writing, managing amateur theatricals, and undertaking several reading tours that reinforced the public's favorable view of his work but took an enormous toll on his health. Working feverishly to the last, Dickens collapsed and died on June 8, 1870, leaving The Mystery of Edwin Drood uncompleted.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of David Copperfield.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Charles John Huffam Dickens (full name) "Boz" (pen name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 7, 1812
    2. Place of Birth:
      Portsmouth, England
    1. Date of Death:
      June 18, 1870
    2. Place of Death:
      Gad's Hill, Kent, England

Read an Excerpt

Christmas Carol


By Charles Dickens

Stewart, Tabori and Chang

Copyright © 1997 Charles Dickens
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1556706480

Chapter One

MARLEY was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it: and Scrooge's name was good upon 'Change, for anything he chose to put his hand to. Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail.
Mind! I don't mean to say that I know, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a door-nail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade. But the wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile; and my unhallowed hands shall not disturb it, or the Country's done for. You will therefore permit me to repeat, emphatically, that Marley was as dead as a door-nail.

Scrooge knew he was dead? Of course he did. How could it be otherwise? Scrooge and he were partners for I don't know how many years. Scrooge was his sole executor, his sole administrator, his sole assign, his sole residuary legatee, his sole friend and sole mourner. And even Scrooge was not so dreadfully cut up by the sad event, but that he was an excellent man of business on the very day of the funeral, and solemnised it with an undoubted bargain.

The mention of Marley's funeral brings me back to the point I started from. There is no doubt that Marley was dead. This must be distinctly understood, or nothing wonderful can come of the story I am going to relate. If we were not perfectly convinced that Hamlet's Father died before the play began, there would be nothing more remarkable in his taking a stroll at night, in an easterly wind, upon his own ramparts, than there would be in any other middle-aged gentleman rashly turning out after dark in a breezy spot-say Saint Paul's Churchyard for instance-literally to astonish his son's weak mind.

Scrooge never painted out Old Marley's name. There it stood, years afterwards, above the warehouse door: Scrooge and Marley. The firm was known as Scrooge and Marley. Sometimes people new to the business called Scrooge Scrooge, and sometimes Marley, but he answered to both names: it was all the same to him.

Oh! but he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old sinner! Hard and sharp as flint, from which no steel had ever struck out generous fire; secret, and self-contained, and solitary as an oyster. The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, shrivelled his cheek, stiffened his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; and spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice. A frosty rime was on his head, and on his eyebrows, and his wiry chin. He carried his own low temperature always about with him; he iced his office in the dog-days; and didn't thaw it one degree at Christmas.

External heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge. No warmth could warm, nor wintry weather chill him. No wind that blew was bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty. Foul weather didn't know where to have him. The heaviest rain, and snow, and hail, and sleet, could boast of the advantage over him in only one respect. They often 'came down' handsomely, and Scrooge never did.

Nobody ever stopped him in the street to say, with gladsome looks, 'My dear Scrooge, how are you? when will you come to see me?' No beggars implored him to bestow a trifle, no children asked him what it was 'oclock, no man or woman ever once in all his life inquired the way to such and such a place, of Scrooge. Even the blindmen's dogs appeared to know him; and when they saw him coming on, would tug their owners into doorways and up courts; and then would wag their tails as though they said, 'no eye at all is better than an evil eye, dark master!'

But what did Scrooge care? It was the very thing he liked. To edge his way along the crowded paths of life, warning all human sympathy to keep its distance, was what the knowing ones call 'nuts' to Scrooge.
Once upon a time-of all the good days in the year, on Christmas Eve-old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house. It was cold, bleak, biting weather: foggy withal: and he could hear the people in the court outside, go wheezing up and down, beating their hands upon their breasts, and stamping their feet upon the pavement-stones to warm them. The city clocks had only just gone three, but it was quite dark already: it had not been light all day: and candles were flaring in the windows of the neighbouring offices, like ruddy smears upon the palpable brown air. The fog came pouring in at every chink and keyhole, and was so dense without, that although the court was of the narrowest, the houses opposite were mere phantoms. To see the dingy cloud come drooping down, obscuring everything, one might have thought that Nature lived hard by, and was brewing on a large scale.

The door of Scrooge's counting-house was open that he might keep his eye upon his clerk, who in a dismal little cell beyond, a sort of tank, was copying letters. Scrooge had a very small fire, but the clerk's fire was so very much smaller that it looked like one coal. But he couldn't replenish it, for Scrooge kept the coal-box in his own room; and so surely as the clerk came in with the shovel, the master predicted that it would be necessary for them to part. Wherefore the clerk put on his white comforter, and tried to warm himself at the candle; in which effort, not being a man of a strong imagination, he failed.

Continues...


Excerpted from Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens Copyright © 1997 by Charles Dickens. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Introduction
Charles Dickens: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text
A Christmas Carol
Appendix A: Reflections on Christmas
1. Washington Irving, from The Sketch Book (1822)
2. Charles Dickens, "A Christmas Dinner" (1836)
3. Charles Dickens, from The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (1836-37)
4. Thomas K. Hervey, from The Book of Christmas (1837)
5. John Calcott Horsley / Sir Henry Cole, The First Christmas Card (1843)
6. Charles Dickens, "A Christmas Tree" (1850)
7. Charles Dickens, "What Christmas Is, As We Grow Older" (1851)
Appendix B: Child Labor, Education, and the Workhouse
1. From Report of the Children's Employment Commission (1842)
2. From Charles Dickens's Speech at the First Annual Soiree of the Athenaeum: Manchester (Oct. 5, 1843)
3. Charles Dickens, "A Walk in a Workhouse" (1850)
Appendix C: From Letters of Charles Dickens
Appendix D: Contemporary Reviews of A Christmas Carol
1. Charles Mackay, Morning Chronicle (December 19, 1843)
2. Anon., Athenaeum (December 23, 1843)
3. Thomas Hood, Hood's Magazine, (January 4, 1844)
4. Laman Blanchard, Ainsworth's Magazine (January 1844)
5. Anon., The Times (January 7, 1844)
6. William Makepeace Thackeray, Fraser's Magazine, (February 1844)
Appendix E: Notable Film, Television, and Radio Adaptations of A Christmas Carol
Select Bibliography

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2003

    "The Best Book I Ever Read!"

    This book is great for adults and teens. It's a bit confusing in some parts but other than that it's a great reading book for the kids. Dickens really let his thoughts 'sing' in this 'carol'!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2003

    WONDERFUL!

    While everyone knows the story of A CHRISTMAS CAROL, how many people have actually read the book? I loved this classic! Needless to say, Dickens is great!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2002

    5 Stars

    A Christmas Carol is about an old bitter man named Scrooge, who in decades has not showed any compassion to any living creature for uncountable years. Ebenezer Scrooge owns a firm called Scrooge and Marley - Jacob Marley being his business partner and sole confidant who passed away years ago. On the night of Christmas Eve, while preparing to retire from his busy workday, he hears boisterous noises and frustrated and frightened answers simply by Bah! Humbug¿s! Marley¿s ghost, tied to heavy chains, appears in front of the stupefied Scrooge and alerts him that three ghosts will be visiting him that night and he must follow and obey them in order for him not to suffer the same consequence as his partner Marly. That night all of the three visit and show him his past, present, and future. Scrooge, alarmed from his future outcome changes to become the caring, charitable, and socially conscious man he was years before. Christmas morning he shocks everyone around with his Christmas spirit. Later that morning he gives Bob Cratchit - worker of Scrooge - the honor of being his equal partner in the firm and gives Cratchit¿s children the best Christmas they¿d ever been the witness to. I enjoyed A Christmas Carol very much, I give this piece of Charles Dickens work five stars because it is a heart warming, extremely well written novel that anyone and everyone should read in their lifetime. It was one of the few that I have not had to put a strong effort forward into continue reading, it captures your attention in the first Stave.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2001

    Christmas Carol

    A Christmas Carol Is A Story About A Man Named Ebenezer Scrooge, Who Doesn't Like Christmas. He Is Then Visited By His Friend Jacob Marley, The Only Problem Is That He's Been Dead For Seven Years! Marley Warns Scrooge That He Will Be Visited By Three Ghosts During The Next Three Nights. These Spirits Are Of Christmas' Past, Present, And Yet To Come. They Are To Convince Scrooge To Change His Ways Of Miserly Greed Before He Becomes Like Marley When He Dies-A Wandering Specter Carrying His Guilt Everywhere He Goes. This Is An Excellent Book For Anyone. No Matter What Age You Are You'll Surely Like It. The Plot Is Well Written And The Characters Are Exquisitely Drawn Out And Sometimes Seem To Come Alive. This Surely Is A Classic and Sets The Standard For Other Christmas Stories Of Its Kind

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2001

    Christmas Carol

    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickensis a good novel that I read in English.This book is great for the Christmas spirit.I would read the book again if I had to.Scrooge is a grinch and the ghost of Marley comes and visits him.Then Marley sends three sprits to visit Scroog. The ghost of past,present, and furture.They show him that Christmas is a time for giving.That is what I think of the novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2001

    Christmas Carol

    Ebeneezer Scrooge sees three ghosts. The first one he sees shows him his past and how happy he used to be. The second shows him his present, and how upset he's being, and what's happening to his job partner. And finally, the third ghost shows him what's goin to happen to him if he doesn't change his way now. I liked this book very much. It was done very well, with full detail.

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