Christmas Stories for the Heart

Overview

This gift book edition of Christmas Stories for the Heart offers an uplifting collection of many of the best Christmas stories ever told. The heartwarming and tender treasury-another release in the bestselling Stories for the Heart series from Alice Gray-includes stories by several of America's most respected and loved Christian communicators. Divided into three sections, "Christmas Treasures," "Once Upon a Christmas Time," and "Christmas Reflections," it's the perfect holiday gift to give or to keep for readers ...

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Overview

This gift book edition of Christmas Stories for the Heart offers an uplifting collection of many of the best Christmas stories ever told. The heartwarming and tender treasury-another release in the bestselling Stories for the Heart series from Alice Gray-includes stories by several of America's most respected and loved Christian communicators. Divided into three sections, "Christmas Treasures," "Once Upon a Christmas Time," and "Christmas Reflections," it's the perfect holiday gift to give or to keep for readers who want to curl up by a crackling fire and renew their faith, hope, and love for the holiday season.

About the Author:

Alice Gray is an inspirational conference speaker and the creator and compiler of the bestselling Stories for the Heart series, now with more than three million copies in print. Alice lives with her husband, Al, in Oregon's high desert country.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781567316964
  • Publisher: MJF Books
  • Publication date: 8/27/2004
  • Series: Stories for the Heart Series
  • Pages: 127
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 7.20 (h) x 0.82 (d)

Meet the Author

Alice Gray is an inspirational conference speaker and the creator and compiler of the bestselling Stories for the Heart book series, with over 5 million in print. She and her husband, Al, live in Arizona.
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Read an Excerpt




Chapter One


THE MANAGER
WAS EMPTY

Retold by Casandra Lindell


He arrived early on Christmas morning to give the church a thorough inspection, noting with approval that the aisles and seats had been swept and dusted after the midnight Christmas Eve service. Any lost purses, Bibles, and gloves had been collected and sent to the office where the lost and found box was kept; every forgotten flyer and bulletin insert had been rounded up and discarded.

    Outside it was just beginning to grow light. In the church, where only the pastor moved, candles flickered and threw shifting shadows on the arches and the stone floor. Occasionally, stray candlelight picked out the rich colors in the stained glass windows. It was cold and, except for the pastor's slow tread, it was silent.

    He paused beside the almost life-sized nativity scene to say a Christmas prayer of thanksgiving to the One whose birth is celebrated. The figures, each lovingly crafted with wonderful realism, sat on a small stage. A night sky and the star that led the shepherds and the wise men to the Messiah on the day of His birth could be seen through the open door of the stable. The shepherds were just entering, eyes wide in obvious awe. Various kinds of livestock stood in stalls or lay on the edges of the scene. And in the center was the Holy Family. Looking at the manger scene, the pastor could almost feel the reverence of that long ago night.

    Slowly, a puzzled frown crept across his brow. Then his choked gasp rustled through the emptychurch.

    The manger was empty! The small figure representing the infant Savior was gone.

    Hurriedly, and with growing agitation, the pastor began to search the church again. Starting by the manger, he peered back through the aisles, nearly crawling on his hands and knees to see all the way under each seat. But there was nothing. Next, he called the custodian, thinking he may have seen the figure of the infant Jesus. Then he called the assistant pastor and all the elders, but no one had any explanation. In the end, each shaking his head sorrowfully, they accepted the truth they had all been trying to avoid: The figure could not have been mislaid or lost—it must have been stolen.

    With solemnity befitting the occasion, the pastor reported the theft to the congregation that assembled not long after. His voice trembled as he told them what he had found earlier that morning. For a person to steal the very symbol of their reason for celebrating, he said, their very reason for hope—well, he just did not understand. His gaze swept over the faces in the early morning congregation, disappointed to think someone in his own congregation might do such a thing.

    "The figure of the Christ Child," he said, "must be returned before this Christmas Day is over. No one will ask any questions, but it must be brought back immediately." Then, he slipped from the pulpit and the choir closed the service with a Christmas hymn, "O Come, Let Us Adore Him."

    The manger remained empty throughout the day.

    Toward the end of the afternoon, discouraged and heavy-hearted, the pastor took a walk through the wintry streets of the neighborhood. Ahead of him he saw one of the youngest members of his flock, a six-year-old boy named Tommy. Bundled shabbily against the cold, Tommy trudged up the sidewalk, proudly dragging behind him a toy express wagon. It was bright and red and obviously Christmas-new.

    Knowing what sacrifice and scrimping the purchase of this toy must have meant—Tommy's family could barely make ends meet—the pastor was deeply touched. The love Tommy's parents had for their little boy gave the pastor's heart a gentle warmth, and he felt his faith in human nature beginning to return. He sped up so he could wish Tommy a merry Christmas and admire the beautiful new wagon.

    But as he drew nearer he saw that the wagon was not empty—there lay the baby Jesus, now wrapped and blanketed but not quite hidden.

    The pastor crouched down beside Tommy, one knee feeling the damp snow through his pant leg. His face was grim and disappointed. Tommy may be just a little boy, and one must make allowances of course—but he was still old enough to understand that stealing was very wrong. The pastor made this crystal clear to Tommy while the little boy stood, his seemingly guiltless clear eyes filling with what the pastor was sure were penitent tears.

    "But, Pastor," the small boy quavered when at last the man finished talking, "I didn't steal Jesus. It wasn't like that at all." He paused to swallow hard and wipe a few tears away. "It's just that I've been asking Him for a red wagon as a Christmas present for a long time—and I promised Him that when I got it I'd take Him out for the first ride."


Chapter Two


TROUBLE
AT THE INN

Dina Donohue


Wally was nine that year and in the second grade, though he should have been in the fourth. Most people in town knew that he had difficulty in keeping up. He was big and clumsy, slow in movement and mind. Still, Wally was well liked by the other children in his class, all of whom were smaller than he, though the boys had trouble hiding their irritation when Wally would ask to play ball with them—or play any game for that matter in which winning was most important.

    Most often they would find a way to keep him out, but Wally would hang around anyway—not sulking, just hoping. He was always a helpful boy, a willing and smiling one, and the natural protector, paradoxically, of the underdog. Sometimes if the older boys chased the younger ones away, it would always be Wally who'd say, "Can't they stay? They're no bother."

    Wally fancied the idea of being a shepherd with a flute in the Christmas pageant that year, but the play's director, Miss Lumbard, assigned him to a more important role. After all, she reasoned, the Innkeeper did not have too many lines, and Wally's size would make his refusal of lodging to Joseph more forceful.

    And so it happened that the usual large audience gathered for the town's yearly extravaganza of crèches, beards, crowns, halos and a whole stage full of squeaky voices. No one on stage or off was more caught up in the magic of the night than Wallace Purling. They said later that he stood in the wings and watched the performance with such fascination that from time to time Miss Lumbard had to make sure he didn't wander onstage before his cue.

    Then the time came when Joseph appeared, slowly, tenderly guiding Mary to the door of the inn. Joseph knocked hard on the wooden door set into the painted backdrop. Wally the Innkeeper was there, waiting.

    "What do you want?" demanded Wally, swinging the door open with a brusque gesture.

    "We seek lodging."

    "Seek it elsewhere." Wally looked straight ahead but spoke vigorously. "The inn is filled."

    "Sir, we have asked everywhere in vain. We have traveled far and are very weary."

    "There is no room in this inn for you." Wally looked properly stern.

    "Please, good innkeeper, this is my wife, Mary. She is heavy with child and needs a place to rest. Surely you must have some small corner for her. She is so tired."

    Now, for the first time, the Innkeeper relaxed his stiff stance and looked down at Mary. With that, there was a long pause, long enough to make the audience a bit tense with embarrassment.

    "No! Be gone!" the prompter whispered from the wings.

    "No!" Wally repeated automatically. "Be gone!"

    Joseph placed his arm around Mary and Mary laid her head upon her husband's shoulder and the two of them started to move away. The Innkeeper did not return inside his inn, however. Wally stood there in the doorway, watching the forlorn couple. His mouth was open, his brow creased with concern, his eyes filling unmistakably with tears.

    And suddenly this Christmas pageant became different from all others.

    "Don't go, Joseph," Wally called out. "Bring Mary back." And Wallace Purling's face grew into a bright smile. "You can have my room."

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Table of Contents

CHRISTMAS TREASURES
THE MANGER WAS EMPTY retold by Casandra Lindell 17
TROUBLE AT THE INN Dina Donohue 21
THE GOLD AND IVORY TABLECLOTH Howard C. Schade 24
TAKE HOLD OF LOVE Henry Carter 28
IF YOU'RE MISSING BABY JESUS, CALL 7162 Jean Gietzen 31
A BIT OF ETERNITY 38
HI THERE! Nancy Dahlberg 39
A STRING OF BLUE BEADS Fulton Oursler 42
AN EXCHANGE OF GIFTS Diane Rayner 47
THE SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS retold by Marilyn McAuley 53
NATIVITY Philip Gulley 55
CHRISTMAS WITHOUT GRANDMA KAY Robin Jones Gunn 58
MY CHRISTMAS MIRACLE Taylor Caldwell 63
"WHERE'S THE BABY JESUS?" Jeannie S. Williams 68
ONCE UPON A CHRISTMAS TIME
THE LEGEND OF THE CHRISTMAS APPLE Ruth Sawyer 79
THE LEGEND OF THE FIRST CHRISTMAS TREE Joni Eareckson Tada 86
THE CHRISTMAS GUEST Edwin Markham 87
THE SECRET OF THE GIFTS Paul Flucke 91
THE LEGEND OF THE ROBIN An old French folktale 98
THE LEGEND OF ST. NICHOLAS AND THE GOLD retold by Dave
Lindstedt 101
FRANKINCENSE AND MYRRH HeywoodBroun 105
THE LEGEND OF THE POINSETTIA retold by Alice Gray 108
THE LEGEND OF THE CHRISTMAS ROSE retold by Casandra Lindell 110
CHRISTMAS REFLECTIONS
THE ARRIVAL Max Lucado 117
DAILY GIFTS Charles R. Swindoll 121
THE STABLE Joni Eareckson Tada 123
THE BIRTHPLACE OF THE KING William Barclay 126
JESUS, WHO IS HE? Tim LaHaye 127
NEXT TIME IT WILL BE DIFFERENT! John F. MacArthur Jr 129
THE GLORY OF HUMILITY Philip Yancey 130
SIMPLE, YET PRICELESS Gigi Graham Tchividjian 132
FOLLOWING THE STAR D. James Kennedy 135
THE ANGELS CALLED IT GOOD NEWS Larry Libby 137
JOY! Jack Hayford 139
CHRISTMAS MEMORIES James Dobson 140
A CHRISTMAS TRADITION Shirley Dobson 142
GOD REST YOU MERRY Ruth Bell Graham 144
THE TREE Crystal J. Kirgiss 145
KEEPING CHRISTMAS Peter Marshall 146
ONE SOLITARY LIFE Richard C. Halverson 148
A CHRISTMAS PRAYER Robert Louis Stevenson 150
BIBLIOGRAPHY 152
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