Christopher Counting

Christopher Counting

by Valeri Gorbachev
     
 

Christopher loves counting. The fish in his aquarium, the petals on flowers, the toys in his toy box-Christopher Rabbit counts them all! He loves counting so much, he tries to count everything-even the stars in the sky! And the good-night kisses his sweet mother wants to share.

Valeri Gorbachev, with his enchanting illustrations, brings life and charm to this

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Overview

Christopher loves counting. The fish in his aquarium, the petals on flowers, the toys in his toy box-Christopher Rabbit counts them all! He loves counting so much, he tries to count everything-even the stars in the sky! And the good-night kisses his sweet mother wants to share.

Valeri Gorbachev, with his enchanting illustrations, brings life and charm to this picture book that shows children the joy and adventure in counting, not only in the classroom-but everywhere!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Unlike many counting books that seem to stomp decisively through numbers one to 10, Gorbachev (Heron and Turtle) camouflages the concept in a story about a gentle rabbit named Christopher who simply falls in love with counting. After a successful lesson at school, Christopher counts everything-pencils, fish, toys, plates, cups, shoes, steps and flower petals-and although the pages are not accompanied by numerals, there are plenty of opportunities for readers to count along with Christopher. Pen and watercolor paintings sweetly capture Christopher's wide-eyed, slightly screwball delight. The dialogue grows somewhat stilted ("A 'Hey, Christopher! We are going to play basketball with the Herons. Come play with us!'... 'Not today. I'd rather count how many baskets you make'A ") and the plot a little pale. However, the exhilaration Gorbachev conveys in his paintings of Christopher is infectious, and readers may very well be tempted to join in this protagonist's numbers game. Ages 5-up. (Apr.)

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Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Like so many youngsters, when young Christopher Rabbit learns to count in school, he wants to count everything in sight. He counts the objects he sees on his way home from school, everything in his backpack, and whatever he finds in his house, from the plates and cups in the kitchen to the boots and shoes in the hall. Counting the steps on his way outside, Christopher goes on to count flowers, petals, and the shots scored in a basketball game. Hide-and-seek offers great counting opportunities. After counting what's in his dinner, Christopher contemplates the stars—too many to count—and settles for one kiss goodnight. Sketchy pen-and-ink lines and transparent watercolors create a simple, slightly comic world for our anthropomorphic bunny and his friends. It recalls a peaceful place where the joys of counting can dominate one's life. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1- Few children will be able to resist the appeal of Christopher Rabbit and his newfound passion. From the minute Ms. Goat begins counting with the class at the start of the school day until he falls asleep in the evening, Christopher seeks out things to count. Children will be familiar with the items that he selects, which include toys; his family's boots, shoes, and sneakers; the number of times Beaver's stone skips across the pond; butterflies in the air; ants on the ground; and the friends he spies during hide-and-seek. As the day comes to an end, Christopher realizes that his last task is too big: "One, two, three...oh no!...It's impossible! There are just too many stars to count." He then settles down for the night with a final count of "one kiss" as his mother tucks him in. The simplicity of this charming story is what sets it apart from others that aim to introduce this concept. The text's deliberate pace is a perfect match for the pen, ink, and watercolor illustrations that allow Christopher's joy to dominate the spreads. His enthusiasm for his new skill is reflected in his expressive bunny ears. By downplaying the items and focusing on the act itself, Gorbachev has created a book that stands apart from the many others on the topic. Not only is it a wonderful read-aloud, but it also works well as a beginning reader.-Maura Bresnahan, High Plain Elementary School, Andover, MA

Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Learning about numbers opens a world of discovery for a curious rabbit. Teacher Ms. Goat uses a basket of oranges to introduce a lesson on counting to the rapt class, which includes a large cross section of animals (turtle, fox, pig, etc.). Practically jumping out of his desk, young rabbit Christopher excitedly takes part and, arms spread wide with joy, leads the parade of students out of school, counting everything in sight. At home, he counts the fish in his aquarium, the plates and cups in the kitchen and all the shoes in the house. Even more opportunities present themselves outside. After dinner (during which he naturally counts all the peas on his plate), Christopher yawns and yawns. Mother Rabbit puts him to bed. "One kiss," he says, drifting off to sleep. Gorbachev's terrifically detailed illustrations, in watercolor and pen-and-ink, greatly enhance the simple, straightforward story. (Picture book. 3-6)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399246296
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
03/27/2008
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.88(w) x 11.28(h) x 0.46(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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