Chronicles Of Avonlea

Chronicles Of Avonlea

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by L. M. Montgomery
     
 

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Most of Montgomery's novels were set in Prince Edward Island and locations within Canada's smallest province became a literary landmark and popular tourist site—namely Green Gables farm, the genesis of Prince Edward Island National Park. She was made an officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1935.

L.M. Montgomery's Chronicles of Avonlea isn't a novel (as

Overview

Most of Montgomery's novels were set in Prince Edward Island and locations within Canada's smallest province became a literary landmark and popular tourist site—namely Green Gables farm, the genesis of Prince Edward Island National Park. She was made an officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1935.

L.M. Montgomery's Chronicles of Avonlea isn't a novel (as are the other volumes we have done in this series). It's a volume of short stories, like "The Hurrying of Ludovic," the tale of Theodora Dix's hurrying a too-thoughtful suitor to the altar, with the help of Anne Shirley; "Old Lady Lloyd," a proud and sad woman whose life has escaped her; "Little Joscelyn," who is a fine, fine singer . . . a dozen tales, all tolled. They've all got Montgomery's wit and her insight. If you are a fan of novels like Anne of Avonlea and Anne of Green Gables. You'll love these tales. The full contents of this volume are "The Hurrying of Ludovic," "Old Lady Lloyd," "Each in His Own Tongue," "Little Joscelyn," "The Winning of Lucinda," "Old Man Shaw's Girl," "Aunt Olivia's Beau," "The Quarantine at Alexander Abraham's," "Pa Sloane's Purchase," "The Courting of Prissy Strong," "The Miracle at Carmody," and "The End of a Quarrel."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781463898502
Publisher:
Aegypan
Publication date:
07/01/2011
Pages:
194
Product dimensions:
0.56(w) x 6.00(h) x 9.00(d)

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Chronicles of Avonlea 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
InTheBookcase More than 1 year ago
Chronicles of Avonlea is a collection of several short stories penned by the beloved L.M. Mongomery, author of the Anne of Green Gables series. Her stories bring out the best of emotions; blissful happiness and the bottomless pit of despair, sometimes at the same moment. The stories in this volume include: The Hurrying of Ludovic, Old Lady Lloyd, Each in His Own Tongue, Little Joscelyn, The Winning of Lucinda, Old Man Shaw's Girl, Aunt Olivia's Beau, The Quarantine at Alexander Abraham's, Pa Sloane's Purchase, The Courting of Prissy Strong, The Miracle at Carmody, The End of a Quarrel. Now, to share with you about my absolute favorites from Chronicles of Avonlea! "Each in His Own Tongue" tells of a musically talented young boy and one of the strangest men in Carmody (or so the local gossips think), Abel Blair. He is a man who has kept to himself for years -- except for in the instance of young Felix Moore, who often stops by to practice playing Abel's violin. The beautiful deed of music must be performed in secret, for Felix's guardian grandfather doesn't approve of such things. Especially since Felix can capture the very soul of a person in musical notes and crescendos. Sometimes the angelic music is so painstakingly true that it's painful to listen to; sometimes it can help those who can't be otherwise reached. "The Winning of Lucinda" is the story of an uncompleted courtship, in a way. That is, if a courtship can be constructed from two young lovers, who after a moment of discord, would not speak to each other for fifteen years, growing older, and yet still engaged throughout the entire span of time. Lucinda and Romney's humorous story is one that members of the interconnected Penhallow families whisper about to each other and have a good chuckle about from time to time. Overall, such an enjoyable story, one that set me to laughing on multiple occasions. "Pa Sloane's Purchase" is another of Mongtomgery's comical pieces, bringing to life a story so silly that it's just perfect. Pa Sloane relishes in sneaking away from Ma anytime, long enough to visit the local auctions. The thrill of placing the winning bid on something, whether needed or useless, excites him for weeks on end. Ma doesn't always approve of his peculiar habit, but generally allows it to continue. Until one day while at an auction, he bids on something she never expected to have in her house again. One day he brings home a baby. (This story is priceless!) This whole volume of stories has made for a very delightful read! I would definitely recommend to any other Montgomery fans. And with an honorable mention, I now pull the following passage out of "The End of a Quarrel", for a particular moment in which many grammar-minded people, myself included, can find a kindred spirit in... [Nancy asked] "By the way, is Peter as ungrammatical as ever?" "I--I don't know," said Louisa helplessly. "I never knew he WAS ungrammatical." "Does he still say, 'I seen,' and 'them things'?" demanded Nancy. "I never noticed," confessed Louisa. "Enviable Louisa! Would that I had been born with that blessed faculty of never noticing! It stands a woman in better stead than beauty or brains."
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I like it because it has not only shown some better way of living a love life but also it has shown the best old-fashioned love stories I've ever read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A great book I couldn't put down. Full of short stories about life on Prince Edward Island. This is a book I will read over and over again.