Church Leadership

Overview

As the body of Christ, the church is basically an organism, not an organization. This fact is full of implications for the way the church organizes itself and the way leadership functions in the church. No book on church leadership has become as controversial as this one. Nor is there a book that spells out so clearly the scriptural implications of the present rule of Christ in the church and the calling of church leaders to be, first of all, servants. This is must reading for pastors, elders, church staff ...
See more details below
Paperback (Revised)
$29.54
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$32.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $11.91   
  • Used (7) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

As the body of Christ, the church is basically an organism, not an organization. This fact is full of implications for the way the church organizes itself and the way leadership functions in the church. No book on church leadership has become as controversial as this one. Nor is there a book that spells out so clearly the scriptural implications of the present rule of Christ in the church and the calling of church leaders to be, first of all, servants. This is must reading for pastors, elders, church staff members, and students preparing for ministry in the church.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780310520917
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Publication date: 8/1/1988
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Pages: 428
  • Sales rank: 1,354,547
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Lawrence O. Richards is currently a full-time author and speaker. He has written over 200 Christian books, including commentaries on every book of the Bible and Zondervan bestselling Adventure Bible and Teen Study Bible, which he did with his wife, Sue. SPANISH BIO: Lawrence O. Richards tiene una licenciatura en filosofia de la Universidad de Michigan, una maestria en teologia y educacion cristiana del Seminario Teologico de Dallas y un doctorado del Seminario Teologico Evangelico Garrett de la Universidad Northwestern. Es autor de unos 200 titulos en temas como la filosofia de la educacion cristiana, renovacion de la iglesia, el ministerio de ninos, ministerio de jovenes, liderazgo, grupos pequenos, y ensenanza biblica. Sus libros han sido traducidos en 24 idiomas. Richards reside en Hudson, Florida donde es participante activo en su iglesia, Hudson's First United Methodist Church.

Clyde Hoeldtke is a church elder and resource team member of Dynamic Church Ministries. He holds a BA degree from Wayne State University and is chairman of Beacon Homes, Inc. in Florida.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Church Leadership

Following the Example of Jesus Christ
By Lawrence O. Richards Clyde Hoeldtke

Zondervan

Copyright © 1988 Zondervan
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-310-52091-6


Chapter One

Angels seated on a great stone jolted from its track announced the new era. Gesturing toward the empty tomb, they proclaimed, "He is not here; he has risen" (Matt. 28:6). The Jesus men put to death could not be held by the grave. The power of God exploded in the battered corpse and Jesus Christ was raised to new life.

The great exposition on the church in Ephesians includes a prayer in which Paul pleads that we be given eyes to see the reality of God's new-life power. He asks that we might grasp the hope set before us. In the resurrected Jesus, you and I have the promise of God's incomparably great power unleashed now, for us. The power that infuses the church is "like the working of his mighty strength, which he exerted in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly realms" (Eph. 1:19-20). That power flows from Jesus into us.

In his prayer Paul also affirms the extent of Jesus' power. We must see Jesus set by God "far above all rule and authority, power and dominion, and every title that can be given, not only in the present age but also in the one to come" (Eph. 1:21). The living Jesus holds ultimate power over the universe and all its personalities. No one can claim an authority or title equal to His. He is "far above all."

Then Paul reveals the appointment of Jesus to the position in which His power is to be exercised. "God placed all things under his feet," Paul writes, "and appointed him to be head over everything for the church, which is his body, the fullness of him who fills everything in every way" (Eph. 1:22-23).

The thrust of Paul's argument is clear:

1. Jesus lives.

2. Jesus possesses ultimate power.

3. Jesus is God's gift to us, appointed to be head over everything for us.

Our struggle to understand leadership must begin with the recognition that in the church we are dealing with a living Christ; that this Jesus acts in "the present age" as well as "the one to come"; and that it is God's express intention that Jesus is to function as "head over everything for the church, which is his body." Whatever role human leadership may play in the church, it must not intrude into the realm of Jesus' headship or claim His prerogatives. Jesus, and Jesus alone, is head of the body.

HEAD

Old Testament usage

To grasp the role Jesus plays in the church and to avoid overstepping our function as human leaders in Christ's body, it is important to understand what it means for anyone to be "head."

In the Old Testament we see many different usages of "head" (r'osh). Individuals could be "heads of their families" (Exod. 6:14) and stand either as progenitors or elders (cf. Num. 7:2). Headship also speaks in the Old Testament of authority and leadership. Moses made some "to have authority over you-as commanders" (Deut. 1:15). Jephthah accepted military control over the forces of Israel and agreed to be head over them (Judg. 11:11). The heads of tribes were chiefs (2 Chron. 5:2), even as the "head" cities in a region were chief cities.

Brown, Driver, and Briggs in their Hebrew and English Lexicon of the Old Testament suggest these dominant usages of r'osh:

1. literally, of the physical head of a person or animal;

2. of the top of a mountain or hill: ears on a stalk of grain;

3. chief city, nation, priest, or head of a family, apparently combined with the idea of first in a series;

4. front, as in the forefront of battle [the leader's place], or, of time, the beginning or first [as "of months"];

5. chief, or choicest [the best].

There is no question that in the Old Testament the term head (r'osh) was applied to human leaders. Their headship involved an authority that was judicial and/or authoritative. It is also clear that leaders were organized into hierarchies. Institutions were set up by procedures like that of Moses, who followed the advice of Jethro to "select capable men from all the people-men who fear God, trustworthy men who hate dishonest gain-and appoint them as officials over thousands, hundreds, fifties and tens" (Exod. 18:21). In this leadership system, Moses, the responsible leader, delegated authority on a graduated scale; only difficult cases worked their way up through the system to come to his attention. As for the rest, the leaders were taught "the decrees and laws," and Moses as trainer showed "them the way to live and the duties they [were] to perform" (v. 20). "Heads" of institutions were this kind of leader.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Church Leadership by Lawrence O. Richards Clyde Hoeldtke Copyright © 1988 by Zondervan. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)