Church of Lies

Church of Lies

3.8 38
by Flora Jessop, Paul T. Brown
     
 

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Praise for Church of Lies

"Flora Jessop's story is raw, courageous, riveting, and a real eye-opener. Once you start reading, you can't put it down. Church of Lies is one more compelling reason why polygamy should not be decriminalized."

John R. Llewellyn, author, Polygamy's Rape of Rachael Strong: Protected

Overview

Praise for Church of Lies

"Flora Jessop's story is raw, courageous, riveting, and a real eye-opener. Once you start reading, you can't put it down. Church of Lies is one more compelling reason why polygamy should not be decriminalized."

John R. Llewellyn, author, Polygamy's Rape of Rachael Strong: Protected Environment for Predators

"This is an important book that sheds light on an ultra-authoritarian secretive community in our midst. Flora Jessop spares no punches in telling her story and describing life in the FLDS, especially the hazards for women and children. But no matter how cruel and oppressive the setting, Jessop was able to break free and help others do the same. A must-read for anyone interested in children's rights, victims' rights, and just plain human decency."

Janja Lalich, PhD, author, Take Back Your Life: Recovering from Cults and Abusive Relationships; coauthor with Margaret Singer, Cults in our Midst

"Risking her life, Flora Jessop has become a folk hero for her defense of countless victims of abuses perpetrated within the Fundamentalist Latter Day Saints community. Her own struggle to free herself of its constraints is remarkable; her advocacy for those who are attempting to leave is inspirational."

Dr. Stephen A. Kent, professor, Department of Sociology andInterdisciplinary Program in Religious Studies, University of Alberta

"Alternating between grit and childlike innocence, Flora Jessop's story is both difficult to read and impossible to put down. She reveals the truth about the secret fundamentalist Mormon FLDS for all to see andskillfully exposes the real dangers that lurk within this twisted religious system."

Natalie R. Collins, author, Wives and Sisters and Behind Closed Doors

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

It is difficult for any person not affiliated with a group like the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (FLDS) to imagine the motivation for living in such a system. Jessop grew up within the strictures of the FLDS cult, subjected to its forced marriages and rampant sexual abuse. Her story is a harrowing but inspiring account of one woman's determination to break free. She relates in rather stark terms the horror of growing up in the polygamous community, the many pleasures she was denied as a child as her elders pursued a pseudo-holiness, forbidding the joys of childhood but engaging in horrible acts of pedophilia. Following her own liberation, she has worked tirelessly and fearlessly to liberate those who want out of the group. Readers will be repelled at some of what Jessop has to say, but in the end, they will be heartened by her efforts to free others in the grip of the FLDS leadership.A (Feb.)

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Library Journal

In this autobiography, Jessop chronicles her upbringing in a polygamist community and her eventual escape and crusade to rescue other women from plural marriages and abuse. A former member of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (FLDS) and controversial antipolygamy activist, Jessop, with the help of Brown (coauthor, Escape in Iraq), tells her story unevenly, finely detailing certain events and glossing over others. Her unorthodox childhood is well documented, and her tales of brainwashing, kidnapping, and physical, mental, and emotional abuse are harrowing. Later chapters detail her rebellion against the FLDS, her marriage to her cousin at age 16, her fight to rescue her sister from the church, and her battle against church and state authorities on behalf of women living in polygamist societies. Jessop's story is gripping and her work admirable, but the writing is choppy and slightly formulaic. The dialog is stilted, and Jessop, despite her passion, does not come across as a particularly sympathetic figure. Nonetheless, the story is compelling and timely and will be of interest to some public library audiences.
—Julie Biando Edwards

From the Publisher
"For those who might feel polygamy is harmless, I suggest they read the just published book, "Church of Lies," by Flora Jessop and Paul T. Brown….Hers is not a pretty story,…But it merits reading as its core message is credible and valid." —The Examiner, February 21-23, 2009

"Church of Lies… is a compelling and heartbreaking — but hopeful — read." (Kansas City Star)

It is difficult for any person not affiliated with a group like the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (FLDS) to imagine the motivation for living in such a system. Jessop grew up within the strictures of the FLDS cult, subjected to its forced marriages and rampant sexual abuse. Her story is a harrowing but inspiring account of one woman’s determination to break free. She relates in rather stark terms the horror of growing up in the polygamous community, the many pleasures she was denied as a child as her elders pursued a pseudo-holiness, forbidding the joys of childhood but engaging in horrible acts of pedophilia. Following her own liberation, she has worked tirelessly and fearlessly to liberate those who want out of the group. Readers will be repelled at some of what Jessop has to say, but in the end, they will be heartened by her efforts to free others in the grip of the FLDS leadership. (Feb.) (Publishers Weekly, December 15, 2008)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470565469
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
03/01/2010
Pages:
328
Sales rank:
307,707
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Flora Jessop is a former victim of a polygamous community and a leading advocate for the recent rescue, separation, and ultimate liberation of the more than four hundred sexually abused FLDS children.

Paul T. Brown is a best-selling author and a nationally acclaimed wildlife photographer. He is the author of the New York Times best seller Escape in Iraq: The Thomas Hamill Story, as well as Conserving Wild America, Paul Brown's Wild Visions, and Freedom Matters.

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Church of Lies 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 37 reviews.
thasista More than 1 year ago
This is a disturbing book to read and infuriates me that activity is tolerated in this country. I was deeply moved. The writer kept me on the edge of my seat and ready to get involved! If you want to know more inside information on what life is like on the inside of a polygamist cult and efforts to extricate oneself from it, this book is for you!
Regimom More than 1 year ago
This book was really, really interesting. Flora Jessop is a hero that had to claw her way out of her severely abusive polygamist upbringing. This book takes you through her struggles, starting when she was only eight years old. I do have to say, some of the scenes in this book are heart breaking and extremely graphic. But in my opinion, they did serve their purpose. This book will open your eyes to the absolute horrors that go on EVERY DAY in this cult. The awful things that are ignored, accepted, or even celebrated. The disgusting practices regarding marrying children off to old men, kicking boys out of the community for the sole reason that they are competition to the old men, and the rampant child molestation that happens to the children living there. All from a woman that lived it first hand. This book was definitely worth the read.
Lady_Toguro More than 1 year ago
When I first read this book it took me a few chapters to realize that, yes, polygamy is WRONG on multiple levels but for some it is all they know from the time they are born until they die. For those strong enough to want something else, it takes a lot to break free of this life. In some cases, it becomes a literal war or manhunt. I recommend this book to people that wish to know what really goes on in America behind closed doors and get a "through the eyes" look at a woman who escaped this horrible life.
Starz198710 More than 1 year ago
Church of Lies is a great read! If you are interested in learning about the inner lives of the FLDS, this is the book for you :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A really good book, a lot of anger behind her words witch was sometimes annoying but she had a right to be upset.
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BonnieS More than 1 year ago
Another saga of the life of women (and men) in the FLDS, and how difficult it is to escape and adjust to life on the outside. Wonderfully told. BonnieS
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Highly recommend buying this book! Its one of the best books I have ever read! You wont be abke to put it down!
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