The Churchills: In Love and War [NOOK Book]

Overview

The epic story of one of England's greatest families, focusing on the towering figure of Winston Churchill.


The first Duke of Marlborough (1650-1722) was a soldier of such genius that a lavish palace, Blenheim, was built to honor his triumphs. Succeeding generations of Churchills sometimes achieved distinction but also included profligates and womanizers, and were saddled with the ruinous upkeep of Blenheim. The family fortunes were revived in the nineteenth century by the huge...

See more details below
The Churchills: In Love and War

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 42%)$18.95 List Price

Overview

The epic story of one of England's greatest families, focusing on the towering figure of Winston Churchill.


The first Duke of Marlborough (1650-1722) was a soldier of such genius that a lavish palace, Blenheim, was built to honor his triumphs. Succeeding generations of Churchills sometimes achieved distinction but also included profligates and womanizers, and were saddled with the ruinous upkeep of Blenheim. The family fortunes were revived in the nineteenth century by the huge dowries of New York society beauties Jennie Jerome (Winston's mother) and Consuelo Vanderbilt (wife to Winston's cousin).



Mary S. Lovell brilliantly recounts the triumphant political and military campaigns, the construction of great houses, the domestic tragedies, and the happy marriage of Winston to Clementine Hosier set against the disastrous unions of most of his family, which ended in venereal disease, papal annulment, clinical depression, and adultery.



The Churchills were an extraordinary family: ambitious, impecunious, impulsive, brave, and arrogant. Winston—recently voted "The Greatest Briton"—dominates them all. His failures and triumphs are revealed in the context of a poignant and sometimes tragic private life.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Having written about the rebellious Mitfords (The Sisters) and daring aviator and world-traveler Beryl Markham (Straight on Til Morning), prolific bestselling biographer Mary S. Lovell now takes on her most challenging subject yet: the Churchills. Beginning her narrative history with their military hero progenitor the first Duke of Marlborough (1650-1722), she introduces us to generations of talented Churchill offspring, including several notable spendthrifts and womanizers. American readers will be particularly fascinated by how the family's fortunes were rescued in the 19th century by marriages to two Manhattan heiresses. And, of course, Sir Winston takes center stage.... Epic; engaging; primed for Father's Day readership.

Walter Olson
Meticulously detailed on figures like the ever fascinating Churchill daughter-in-law Pamela Harriman, Lovell softens her focus when it comes to the great man himself. Drink and depression remain mostly offstage. Nor does she probe how the clan’s absentee approach to child rearing might have related to the unhappy adult life of three of Winston and Clementine’s four grown children. Lovell steers even farther clear of the revisionist literature on both the left and the libertarian right that paints Churchill as a warmonger and political opportunist.
—The New York Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly
Lovell's previous biographical subjects, including Jane Digby and the Mitford sisters, connecting the upper classes of England and their long lists of lovers, mistresses, and scandals to the descendents of the Dukes of Marlborough, can now be seen as little more than preambles to her latest epic work. Preserving Blenheim, John Churchill's Oxfordshire palace built by a "grateful nation" has been the primary goal of the succeeding dukes over its 300-year history. But the Churchills were the first to take advantage of the "dollar princesses" by wedding American heiresses to preserve the immense and very expensive estate. Jenny Jerome did bring capital to her love match with Randolph, but his nephew, Sunny, the ninth duke, hit the jackpot with Consuelo Vanderbilt and her vast fortune. Alas, money and love don't always go hand in hand; few of the Ducal marriages were happy. While Lovell deals with each of the generations from the first Duke of Marlborough through present day, her focus is on Jennie Jerome Churchill and her son, Winston, thanks in part to the plentiful journals they kept. These subjects have been sufficient fodder for numerous biographies but Lovell (The Sisters: The Saga of the Mitford Family) deftly sorts through the existing facts to create a well-researched and gossipy book. (May)
New York Times Book Review
Meticulously detailed
. . . eminently readable.— Walter Olson
Booklist
“Famous lives ever fascinate, and does Lovell ever deliver.”
From the Publisher
"Lovell's writing style will keep [listeners] wanting more." —-Library Journal
Walter Olson - New York Times Book Review
“Meticulously detailed
. . . eminently readable.”
Library Journal
Although the central character here may be Winston Churchill, British biographer Lovell (A Rage To Live: A Biography of Richard and Isabel Burton) essentially offers a popular biography of several members of the 19th- and 20th-century Churchill family, with less coverage beforehand on the earlier Churchills, such as the original Duke and Duchess of Marlborough. Lovell tends to be drawn to strong female characters, and her new book is no exception; she devotes significant attention to American heiresses Jennie Jerome (Winston Churchill's mother) and Consuelo Vanderbilt (his cousin by marriage). Lovell's writing style will keep general readers wanting more, and although the information on Churchill relatives is sometimes scandalous, her treatment of Winston Churchill himself is worshipful. All in all, Lovell delves into the personal rather than the political. Ending her coverage more or less with Winston's and then his wife Clementine's death, she uses mainly published sources to describe a remarkable family that was also quite ordinary in its dysfunction and foibles. VERDICT For a more political look at Winston Churchill, readers should turn to Geoffrey Best's Churchill: A Study in Greatness. Lovell's book is recommended to general readers, especially lovers of accessible historical biography, rather than Churchill specialists.—Maria Bagshaw, Ecolab, St. Paul
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393082265
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/2/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 624
  • Sales rank: 189,645
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Mary S. Lovell's best-selling biographies include Straight on Till Morning (Beryl Markham) and The Sisters (the Mitford family). She lives in England.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface ix

Selective Family Tree xiv

1 1650-1750 'Thou art a rascal, John Churchill' 1

2 1850-74 Randolph and Jennie 15

3 1874-5 The Birth of Winston 44

4 1875-80 A Dysfunctional Family 54

5 1880-7 A Career Thrown Away 71

6 1887-95 Lilian's Millions 101

7 1892-5 Consuelo, the Dollar Princess 119

8 1895-9 The Unhappy Duchess 141

9 1896-9 Looking for Trouble 157

10 1899-1900 National Hero! 173

11 1900-4 The Young Lion 189

12 1904-7 My Darling Clementine 210

13 1907-8 Couples 232

14 1908-14 The Next Generation 254

15 1914-16 A Fall from Power 276

16 1917-21 The Armistice and After 306

17 1921-4 Black Times 324

18 1921-31 The Twenties 345

19 1932-7 Changes at Blenheim 369

20 1938-9 Towards Armageddon 396

21 1939-40 'But You Don't Know Me' 411

22 1941-4 The Long Slog 439

23 1943-5 Weathering the Storm 463

24 1945-51 The Aftermath 487

25 1952-5 A New Era 505

26 1955-63 Safe Harbour 528

27 1963-78 Crossing the Bar 554

Appendix 1 Family and Friends 571

Appendix 2 Lord Randolph Churchill and the Diagnosis of Syphilis 578

Notes 581

Bibliography 593

Acknowledgements 597

Copyright Credits 599

Author's Note 600

Index 601

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 5, 2013

    Fascinating story, a compelling read, and lots of research

    Although I’ve read several books in which Winston Churchill was a prominent character, I’ve never read a biography of him. Not that reading biographies is painful to me, but The Churchills in Love and War has to be the least painful way to read biography. The author says right up front that some readers find the book “gossipy,” that other author have covered in depth various facets of Churchill’s life. She focused on the personal lives of several generations of the Churchill family. And it is “gossipy” in the very best way. The story starts in the Victorian era. But knowing the intimate lives of the aristocratic men and woman makes readers realize that, although sex was a taboo topic for conversation in that era, it was something that everyone – married and unmarried – spent a lot of time doing. Whew! But what about Winston Churchill? The author figures that he was an exception – that he was always faithful (at least physically) to his wife Clementine and she to him. I appreciated the author’s including a family tree to refer to … and that, when she referred to a new character, she included information about that person in a footnote. Sourcing information was included in backnotes. In other words, she made reading and making sense of all the convoluted relationships really easy. Fascinating story, a compelling read, and lots of research – who could ask more in a biography? I couldn’t put it down – and it also made me to want to start reading some of the books written by Sir Winston.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2012

    Really Good

    Really Good. Would recommend for anyone who enjoys the Churchills and wants to go beyond Winston.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 25, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Highly recommend for the Churchill buff.

    Excellent read. This book delvs more into the personal life of Winston Churchill that it does on his political life which was very interesting.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)