The Cinderella Deal

( 387 )

Overview

New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Crusie brings humor and storytelling magic to this modern-day romance of a match made anywhere but in heaven?but destined for a fairy-tale ending.

Daisy Flattery is a free spirit with a soft spot for strays and a weakness for a good story. Why else would she agree to the outrageous charade offered by her buttoned-down workaholic neighbor, Linc Blaise? The history professor needs to have a fianc?e in order to capture his dream job, and ...

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Overview

New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Crusie brings humor and storytelling magic to this modern-day romance of a match made anywhere but in heaven—but destined for a fairy-tale ending.

Daisy Flattery is a free spirit with a soft spot for strays and a weakness for a good story. Why else would she agree to the outrageous charade offered by her buttoned-down workaholic neighbor, Linc Blaise? The history professor needs to have a fiancée in order to capture his dream job, and Daisy is game to play the role. But something funny happens on their way to the altar that changes everything. Now, with the midnight hour approaching, will Daisy lose her prince, or will opposites not only attract but live happily ever after?
 

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for Jennifer Crusie
 
“Crusie’s talent [is] for writing wacky romantic plots that shine with generous amounts of humor and enormous good cheer.”—Library Journal, on Faking It
 
“With humor, irony and a whole lot of wit, Jennifer Crusie straps in her readers and takes them on a memorable ride. . . . She is a masterful storyteller.”—Romantic Times, on Fast Women

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553593365
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/26/2010
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 1,414,595
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 6.80 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Jennifer  Crusie
Jennifer Crusie is the bestselling and award-winning author of more than fifteen contemporary novels. Her work has been published in twenty countries.

Biography

Don't expect to see Fabio's flowing mane on the cover of any of Jennifer Crusie's romance novels. She completely eschews the tradition of overwrought melodrama and heaving bosoms to toss a comic gauntlet into the romantic arena. Her fun, funny, and frisky books are a refreshing breeze in a genre that could easily grow stale.

Former schoolteacher Jennifer Smith got her Master's degree in Professional Writing and Women's Literature at Wright State University. She wrote her thesis on women's roles in mystery fiction before trying her hand at penning romance novels using her grandmother's family name Crusie. Despite her impressive credentials, she dismisses her debut novel Sizzle as "lousy" even as her fans clamber to gets their hands on this long out-of-print pulp romance. "That damn book is following me around the way early porn films follow actresses," so says Crusie one her web site of Sizzle.

No matter what the author thinks of her first effort, the astounding string of critically lauded bestsellers that followed it have firmly established Crusie as one of the very best writers of contemporary romantic fiction. Much of this is due to her sharp wit and ear for comedic dialogue, humor being an element often sorely missing in romance novels. From the sly private dick tale What the Lady Wants to the frantic Faking It, Crusie's books contain the perfect balance of suspense, snickers, and steamy love scenes.

What's more, the author has raked up a slew of awards, as well as spots on "best romance novels of the year" for Anyone But You, Temptation, Fast Women, and Faking It. Getting Rid of Bradley scored Crusie a RWA Rita award for Best Short Contemporary Fiction, and in 1996, she received a career achievement award for her work in the romantic comedy genre from Romantic Times magazine.

Now, after 13 crowd pleasers and award winners, Crusie is offering up her first-ever collaboration. She teamed up with hard-boiled action writer Bob Mayer (Operation Dragon-Sim) to conjure up Don't Look Down, a wacky escapade that is equal parts comedy, adventure, and playful erotica.

In Don't Look Down, movie director Lucy Armstrong goes toe-to-toe and heart-to-heart with J.T. Wilder, a green beret who serves as an advisor on a movie that is taking an unexpected turn from romantic comedy to blow-‘em-up action flick. Publisher's Weekly has declared the joint-effort "good fun," and Crusie reveals on her website that more fun with Mayer is on the way. The team is currently working on their second novel together Agnes and the Hitman.

As for future solo ventures by Crusie, there's plenty more in store. She not only has another release slotted for 2006 -- a sexy yuletide novella titled Hot Toy, which will appear in St. Martin's Press' Santa Baby anthology -- but she currently has no less than five additional projects on the burner. Among these upcoming releases are a collection of short stories and a book that Crusie is particularly qualified to create: a guide to writing women's fiction.

Good To Know

Crusie and Bob Mayer are making things a little easier for guys who want to check out their new collaborative novel Don't Look Down. All you have to do is remove the cutesy dust jacket to reveal a tough-as-nails camouflage cover design and voila! No one will ever know you're enjoying a romantic comedy.

Crusie is the proud owner of three dogs, one of which is named Lucy. Oddly, the main character of Don't look Down is also named Lucy -- and happens to be a director of dog food commercials. Coincidence?

Crusie has a few nonfiction works to her credit, including introductions in Totally Charmed, a collection of essays about Alyssa Milano's cult TV series, and Anne Rice: A Critical Companion, which the author wrote under her given name of Jennifer Smith.

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    1. Hometown:
      Ohio
    1. Date of Birth:
      1949
    2. Place of Birth:
      Ohio
    1. Education:
      B.A., Bowling Green State University, 1973; M.A., Wright State University; Ph.D., Ohio University, 1986

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The storm raged dark outside, the light in the hallway flickered, and Lincoln Blaise cast a broad shadow over the mailboxes, but it didn’t matter. He knew by heart what the card on the box above his said:

Daisy Flattery

Apartment 1B

Stories Told, Ideas Illminated

Unreal but Not Untrue

Linc frowned at the card, positive it didn’t belong on a mailbox in the dignified old house he shared with three other tenants. That was why he’d rented the apartment in the first place: it had dignity. Linc liked dignity the way he liked calm and control and quiet. It had taken him a long time to get all of those things into his life and into one apartment. Then he’d met his downstairs neighbor.

His frown deepened as he remembered the first time he’d seen Daisy Flattery in the flesh, practically hissing at him as he shooed a cat away from his rebuilt black Porsche, her dark, frizzy hair crackling around her face like lightning. Later sightings hadn’t improved his first impression, and the memory of them didn’t improve his mood now. She wore long dresses in electric colors, and since she was tall, they were very long, and she was always scowling at him, her heavy brows drawn together under that dumb blue velvet hat she wore pulled down around her ears even in the summer. She looked like somebody from Little House on the Prairie on acid, which was why he usually took care to ignore her.

But now, staring down at the card on her mailbox, appropriately backlit by the apocalyptic storm, he knew there was a possibility he might actually have to get to know her. And it was his own damn fault.

The thought gave him a headache, so he shoved his mail into his jacket pocket and went up the stairs to his apartment and his aspirin.

Downstairs, Daisy Flattery frowned too, and cocked her head to try to catch again the sound she’d heard. It had been something between a creaking door and a cat in trouble. She looked over at Liz to see if she was showing signs of life, but Liz was, as usual, a black velvet blob stretched out on the end table Daisy had rescued from a trash heap two streets over. The cat basked in the warmth from the cracked crystal lamp Daisy had found at Goodwill for a dollar. The three made a lovely picture, light and texture and color, silky fur and smooth wood and warm lamp glow. Unbelievably, fools had thrown away all three; sometimes the blindness of people just amazed Daisy.

“Hello?” The petite blonde across the chipped oak table from Daisy waved her hand. “You there? You have the gooniest look on your face.”

“I thought I heard something,” Daisy told her best friend. “Never mind. Where was I? Oh, yeah. I’m broke.” She shrugged at Julia across from her. “Nothing new.”

“Well, you’re depressed about it. That’s new.” Julia took a sugar cookie from the plate in front of her and shoved the rest toward Daisy with one manicured hand, narrowly missing Daisy’s stained glass lamp. The lamp was another find: blue, green, and yellow Tiffany pieces with a crack in one that had made it just possible for her to buy it. The crack had been the clincher for Daisy: with the crack, the lamp had a history, a story; it was real. Sort of like her hands, she tried to tell herself as she compared them to Julia’s. Blunt, paint-stained, no two nails the same length. Interesting. Real.

Julia, as usual, had missed color and pattern completely and was still on words. “Also, you’re the one who has to come up with the bucks for the feline senior cat chow. I should eat so good.”

“Right.” Daisy scrunched up her face. She hated thinking about money, which was probably why she hadn’t had much for the past four years. “Maybe leaving teaching wasn’t such a good idea.”

Julia straightened so fast, Liz opened an eye again.

“Are you kidding? This is new. I can’t believe you’re doubting yourself.” She leaned across the table to stare into Daisy’s eyes. “Get a grip. Make some tea to go with these cookies. Tell me a story. Do something weird and unpractical so I’ll know you’re Daisy Flattery.”

“Very funny.” Daisy pushed her chair back and went to find tea bags and her beat-up copper teakettle. She was sure the tea bags were in one of the canisters on the shelf, but the kettle could be anywhere. She opened the bottom cupboard and started pawing through the pans, books, and paintbrushes that had somehow taken up housekeeping together.

“I’m not kidding.” Julia followed her to the sink. “I’ve known you for twelve years, and this is the first time I’ve heard you say you can’t do something.”

Daisy was so outraged at the thought that she pulled her head out of the cupboard without giving herself enough clearance and smacked herself hard. “Ouch.” She rubbed her head through her springy curls. “I’m not saying I can’t make it as an artist.” Daisy stuck her head back into the cabinet and shoved aside her cookie sheets long enough to find her teakettle and yank it out. “I believe in myself. I just may have moved too fast.” She got up and filled the kettle from the faucet.

“Well, it’s not like you ever move slow.” Julia took down canisters one by one, finally finding the tea in a brown and silver square can. “Why did you put the tea in the can that says ‘cocoa’? Never mind. Constant Comment or Earl Grey?”

“Earl Grey.” Daisy put the kettle on the stove and turned up the heat. “This is a serious moment, and I need a serious tea.”

“Which is why I’m drinking Constant Comment.” Julia waggled her long fingers inside the canister and fished out two tea bags. “I have no serious moments.”

“Well, pretend you’re having one for me.” Daisy sighed, envying Julia’s optimism. Of course, Julia hadn’t quit a safe and solid teaching job to become a painter, or spent the past four years living on her savings until she didn’t have any. Daisy felt her head pound. “Julia, I don’t think I can do this anymore. I’m tired of scraping to pay my bills, and I’m tired of trying to sell my paintings to people who don’t understand what I’m doing, and I’m tired—” She bit her lip. “I’m so tired of worrying about everything.” That was the thing, really; she was worn down from the uncertainty. Like water on a rock; that was what the edge of poverty did to you.

“So what are you going to do?” Julia asked, but somewhere there was a faint sound, half screech and half meow, and Daisy cocked her head again instead of answering.

“I swear I hear a cat crying,” she told Julia. “Listen. Do you hear anything?”

Julia paused and then shook her head. “Uh-uh. Your water’s starting to boil. Maybe that’s it.”

Daisy took the kettle off while Julia took down two mismatched cups and saucers, plunking her Constant Comment tea bag in a Blue Willow cup and Daisy’s Earl Grey in the bright orange Fiestaware. Daisy poured the hot water over the bags and said, “Pretty” as the tea color spread through the cups.

“Forget the pretty tea.” Julia picked up her cup and carried it back to the table. “You’re in crisis here. You’re out of money and you can’t sell your paintings. How’s the storytelling going?”

“Budget cuts.” Daisy sat down across from her with her own cup and saucer. “Most libraries can’t afford me, and it’s a slow time for bookstores, and forget schools entirely. They all say I’m very popular and they’ll use me again as soon as possible, but in the meantime I’m out of luck.”

“Okay.” Julia crinkled her nose as she thought. “How else were you making money? Oh, the jewelry. What about the jewelry?”

Daisy winced with guilt. “That’s selling, but Howard won’t give me the money until the end of the month. And he owes me from the end of last month, but he’s holding on to that too. It’s not that much, about a hundred, but it would help.” She knew she should go in and demand her jewelry money, but the thought of Howard sneering at her wasn’t appealing. He looked so much like her father that it was like every summer she’d ever spent with him condensed into two minutes.

Julia frowned at her. “So how much do you need? To keep the wolf from the door, I mean.”

Daisy sighed. “About a thousand. Last month’s rent, this month’s rent, and expenses. That would get me to when Howard pays and then maybe something else would turn up.” That sounded pathetic, so she took a deep breath and started again. “The thing is, I quit so I could paint, but I’m spending all my time trying to support myself instead of concentrating on my work. I thought I’d have a show by now, but nobody understands what I’m doing. And even though I almost have enough paintings for a show, I’m not sure what I’m doing is right for who am I now anyway.”

Julia sipped her tea. “Ouch. Hot. Blow on yours first. What do you mean, you’re not sure what you’re doing is right? I love your paintings. All those details.”

“Well, that’s it.” Daisy shoved her tea away to lean closer. “I like the details too, but I’ve done them. I think I need to stretch, to try things that are harder for me, but I can’t afford to. I’m building my reputation on primitive narrative paintings; I can’t suddenly become an abstract expressionist.”

Julia made a face. “That’s what you want to do?”

“No.” Daisy shut her eyes, trying to see the paintings she wanted to do, paintings with the emotions in the brushstrokes instead of in the tiny painted details, thick slashes of paint instead of small, rich dots. “I need to work larger. I need—”

The mewling cry that had teased her earlier came again, louder. “That is definitely a cat,” Daisy said, and went to open the window.

The wind exploded in and stirred Daisy’s apartment into even more chaos than usual. Liz rolled to her feet and meowed her annoyance, but Daisy ignored her and leaned out into the storm.

Two bright eyes stared up at her from under the bush beneath her window.

“You stay right there,” she told them, and ran for the apartment door.

“Daisy?” Julia called after her, but she let the door bang behind her and ran out into the rain. Whatever it was had vanished, and Daisy got down on her hands and knees in the mud to peer under the bush.

A kitten peered back, soaked and mangy and not at all happy to see her. Daisy reached for it and got clawed for her pains. “I’m rescuing you, dummy,” she told it when she’d hauled it out from under the bush and it was squirming against her. “Stop fighting me.”

Once inside, she wrapped the soaked little body in a dish towel while Julia and Liz looked at it with equal distaste.

“It looks like a rat,” Julia said. “I can’t believe it. You rescued a rat.”

Liz hissed, and when Daisy toweled the kitten dry, it hissed too.

“It’s a calico kitten.” Daisy got down on her knees so she could go eye to eye with the towel-wrapped little animal on the table. “You’re okay now.”

The mottled kitten glared at her and screeched its meow with all the melody of a fingernail down a blackboard.

“Just what you needed. Another mouth to feed,” Julia said, and the kitten screeched at her too. “And what a mouth it is.” Julia shot a sympathetic look at Liz. “If you want to come live with me, I understand,” she told the cat. “I know you’re legally dead, but even you must draw the line at living with a rat.”

Liz glared at the kitten one more time and then curled up under the light and went back to sleep.

“A kitten doesn’t eat much,” Daisy said, and went to get food. She found a can of tuna on the shelf over the stove, stuck behind her copy of Grimms’ fairy tales, a jar of alizarin crimson acrylic paint, and her cinnamon. She took down the can and called back to Julia. “Want some tuna?”

“No. I just came over to bring you the cookies, and then I got distracted.” Julia and the kitten looked at each other with equal distaste. “You know, this is not a happy rat.”

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 387 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(114)

4 Star

(132)

3 Star

(92)

2 Star

(31)

1 Star

(18)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 389 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Absolutely Wonderful

    Jennifer Crusie is a favorite author of mine and she did not disappoint with this book. Her characters are always easy to relate to. I love how she bases hers books on characters that not perfect, but have imperfections that real women have. She always has the right amount of romance in her books. This book had it all...Great characters, romance, and comedy. A definite must read!!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2010

    Charming!

    The first book on my nook. So charming that I stayed up until all hours of the night reading. So delilghtful that I think you'll enjoy this.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2010

    cute

    I wouldn't say this book is great but it is cute and a quick read. Somewhat-okay-very predictable but since it's so short, tolerable.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 30, 2012

    It was a quick fun read, but nothing interesting nor memorable.

    It was a quick fun read, but nothing interesting nor memorable. I do enjoy Jennifer Crusie's books, but I don't think this one is among her top works. Her other stories are more comedic and off-beat or hot. This one is the standard let's pretend to be together and eventually the predictable happens. How the main characters grow on each other is sweet, but again, it doesn't make a lasting impression on me.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Just what I was looking for...

    ... that being something sweet and lighthearted. Crusie has a defined voice that is very appealing and is able to help her characters develop and grow in a charming way. There aren't any great plot surprises (but really, I didn't expect any) but it was an enjoyable, fast read.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 3, 2012

    Absolute first rate romance. In a romance we all know how its g

    Absolute first rate romance. In a romance we all know how its going to end ---- so its the journey that counts. And this is a great trip. Two great characters draw from each others strength and accept their weaknesses. Highly recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 22, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The Cinderella Deal is a classic by Jenny Crusie.

    Get ready to follow the prince around trying to find the damsel that fits into the glass slipper. Jennifer Crusie's re-issued novel from 1996 is a heart-warming, feel good, boy meets girl and doesn't know what to do with her, that so fit's into today. Meet Daisy a free spirit who has a hard time paying her bills and always falls for the wrong guy, bring in Linc, a stodgy, black and white thinking professor looking to improve his resume and his career. The only thing missing his getting the perfect job is him having the perfect woman to accent him. But has he got a deal for Daisy, a Cinderella Deal that is.
    Jenny never disappoints with her wonderful storytelling and The Cinderella Deal is no exception. She gives us characters that jump off the page with their liveliness and uniqueness. You will not be able to stop yourself from loving Daisy and Linc, two of the most unlikely and unforgettable hero and heroine you'll ever have the pleasure of reading about, and don't forget her supporting characters some you'll love and some you'll love to hate, of course the most memorable supporting cast is her casting of the pets that Daisy and Linc by association adopts. Her dialogue is witty and funny and by the time you've finished you wish there are 300 more pages at least. Her romance is sweet and tender while her love scenes will burn a hole through a glacier.
    So jump on board the magic carriage before it turns into a pumpkin and read one of Jennifer Crusie's classic romances The Cinderella Deal.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2010

    great fun to read

    I enjoyed this as my first enook read. It was quirky, quick to read, and enjoyable. What a great way to enjoy an evening! A sweetheart of a tale! Read and enjoy!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2013

    What's Her Deal?

    Not your typical Jennifer Cruisie novel, but a great, quick read. The plot was predictable, but the fact it came from Jennifer was most surprising. Can't tell if it's her best or worst work.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2013

    Cute

    Good short story. Expensive for the number of pages. Fast read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2013

    Quick and predictable

    Good, quick read. Predictable from the very beginning, but enjoyable.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 21, 2013

    Great relatable characters as always

    I've been a fan of Ms Crusie for a while now, and one of the things I've always liked about her books are the characters that you can relate to. This book doesn't disappoint, and I found myself laughing throughout the book. I purchased the audiobook version, and Susan Boyce did a great job on the voices, especially since there are so many characters throughout the story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2013

    One of my favorite Jennifer Crusie novels

    fun with lots of great characters. I've never read a Jennifer Crusie book I didn't like.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2013

    I was disappointed. I really like Crusie's work, but this book w

    I was disappointed. I really like Crusie's work, but this book was hard for me to like. It's very typical/predictable and I felt the ending had that 
    'too-good-to-be-true' touch to it. Really? Now you're all over, madly in love with me and can't take your hands of me and every moment is
    just so magical because I'm so in love. :-/ Maybe I'm just cynical. But if you have the time for something quick to read, this is the book for 
    you. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2012

    Wonderful feel good book!

    Absolutely loved this book! The plot was interesting, the characters very real and, best of all, it made me laugh out loud. I couldn't put it down and hated to have it end. This is my first Jennifer Crusie book, hope there are many more just like this one!

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  • Posted October 5, 2012

    Must Read

    I enjoyed this book because it had all the aspects I wanted.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2012

    Always a great read

    Jennifer Crusie win!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2012

    ?

    I don't know what happened

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2011

    A Must Read

    A perfect read for all the hopeless romantics at heart!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2011

    I would love to recommend this book. . .

    But since Barnes and Noble only sends everything in an order at once I haven't gotten these books, and won't for another 2-3 weeks. . .

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 389 Customer Reviews

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