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Cinderella
     

Cinderella

3.8 7
by Marcia Brown, Charles Perrault
 

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Cinderella...or The Little Glass Slipper

There is perhaps no better loved, no more universal story than CINDERELLA. Almost every country in the world has a version of it, but the favorite of story-tellers is the French version by Charles Perrault.

This translation is excellent for storytelling and also reading aloud. Marcia Brown's

Overview

Cinderella...or The Little Glass Slipper

There is perhaps no better loved, no more universal story than CINDERELLA. Almost every country in the world has a version of it, but the favorite of story-tellers is the French version by Charles Perrault.

This translation is excellent for storytelling and also reading aloud. Marcia Brown's illustrations are full of magic and enchantment from the little cupids putting back the hands of the clock to the last scene at the palace. They are pictures that will stay in a child's mind.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Nearly two decades after its original publication, Susan Jeffers's detailed pen-and-ink and dye illustrations once again grace Charles Perrault's Cinderella (1985), retold by Amy Ehrlich. PW called Ehrlich's retelling "absorbing [and] easily grasped," while the artwork "shows Jeffers's gifts at their dazzling best." Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
This timeless story tells of the young girl who is mistreated by her step mother and step sisters. Eventually goodness triumphs and Cinderella's fairy godmother helps her go to the ball where she meets the charming prince. She runs away, he finds her, and they live happily ever after. This is an easy to read version of the story with beautiful pastel colored illustrations.
Children's Literature - Carolyn Mott Ford
It was Charles Perrault who, as the book jacket points out, compiled the collection of fairytales that included Cinderella, Bluebeard, Little Red Riding Hood, Puss in Boots, and The Sleeping Beauty. This is a translation from the French, which has attempted to retain the essence of the original while making the classic story of the lovely and virtuous Cinderella accessible to the readers of today. The story of the harsh treatment of Cinderella by her cruel stepmother and hateful stepsisters is familiar. In this version, Cinderella leaves the ball at a quarter to twelve. It is when she attends a second ball that she forgets the promise she made to her fairy godmother. Cinderella dances the whole night away with the prince until the clock strikes twelve. When her secret is found out, Cinderella's stepsisters beg for forgiveness and she is able to totally forgive them.
Kirkus Reviews
Cinderella (32 pp.; , PLB Apr.; 0-7358-1051-6, PLB 0-7358-1052-4): Perrault's ancient tale of Cinderella has been slimmed and toned down considerably, with her virtues less evident and the supporting cast less effective. Readers will wonder why Cinderella's father, who is not conveniently dead in this story, doesn't rally to her aid, but they will be otherwise enchanted by Koopmans's delicate illustrations. One good French touch comes at dinner; the prince is so besotted that "even when the most delicious dishes were served for supper, he could not eat a morsel." (Picture book/folklore. 5-8) .

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689814747
Publisher:
Aladdin
Publication date:
04/28/1997
Edition description:
2ND
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
266,952
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
AD840L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Marcia Brown, one of the most honored illustrators in children's literature, is a three-time Caldecott Medalist and six-time Caldecott Honor illustrator, as well as winner of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for the body of her work. She lives in Laguna Hills, California.

Marcia Brown, one of the most honored illustrators in children's literature, is a three-time Caldecott Medalist and six-time Caldecott Honor illustrator, as well as winner of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for the body of her work. She lives in Laguna Hills, California.

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Cinderella 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Gardenseed More than 1 year ago
This is probably the best translation for storytelling.The words flow and there are no unnecessary details. If you buy just one, buy this version.
Varousi More than 1 year ago
Great translation
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
dreaming world
Guest More than 1 year ago
Marcia Brown does not stray far from the classic story of the abused stepdaughter, the evil stepmother and stepsisters, the loving fairy godmother, and the handsome prince. This version is especially good for reading aloud.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Marcia Brown was a high school teacher for three years in New York. She had wanted to be a doctor but coming from a family financially unable to send her to medical school she instead became a teacher. After three years of teaching she quit to pursue her dream of writing and illustrating children¿s books. She became the first person ever to have won the Caldecott three times. One of these medals was for her translation of Cinderella in 1954. She won the 1955 Caldecott for her translation and illustration of this book. This book is considered traditional literature. The first page gives it away it has the traditional first line ¿Once upon a time¿. It goes without saying that this is a wonderful book. After all it is a classic. This is the story of how a hard working and mistreated young girl meets her Fairy God Mother. Her Fairy God Mother helps her to realize her dreams. Will everything work out the way it is suppose to? Only reading will tell. Brown, Marcia. Cinderella. New York: Scribner Press, 1954. Reading Level 5.1
Guest More than 1 year ago
Cinderella offers a compelling insight into the belief systems that, I can proudly say, are now being put to the test in modern academia: one of the Midwest¿s finest universities in Milwaukee, Marquette University. Although supposedly written for children, this book was obviously intended for a more mature audience that could read more deeply into the texts to derive it's full meaning. If your children possess this book, I urge you to spare them the hardship of reading it now, and save it for 15 years later, when they are capable of understanding the complex nature of this literary masterpiece. I guess the only word I can use to describe this book, as I sit here staring at it in the Marquette University library, is 'wow'. Thank you, and I hope I have inspired others to drop their 'Shakespeare' and 'Homer' books, and read a real challenging literary masterpiece like Cinderella, as has been demanded by my school for our Freshman English curriculum.