Cinema And Desire

Overview

Dai Jinhua is one of contemporary China’s most influential theoreticians and cultural critics. A feminist Marxist, her literary, film and TV commentary has, over the last decade, addressed an expanding audience in China, Taiwan and Hong Kong.

Cinema and Desire presents Dai Jinhau’s best work to date. In it she examines the Orientalism that made Zhang Yimou the darling of international film festivals, establishes Huang Shuqin’s Human, Woman, Demon as the People’s Republic’s first...

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Overview

Dai Jinhua is one of contemporary China’s most influential theoreticians and cultural critics. A feminist Marxist, her literary, film and TV commentary has, over the last decade, addressed an expanding audience in China, Taiwan and Hong Kong.

Cinema and Desire presents Dai Jinhau’s best work to date. In it she examines the Orientalism that made Zhang Yimou the darling of international film festivals, establishes Huang Shuqin’s Human, Woman, Demon as the People’s Republic’s first genuinely feminist film, comments on TV representations of the Chinese diaspora in New York, speculates on the value of Mao Zedong as an icon of post-revolutionary consumerism, and analyses the rise of shopping plazas in 1990s’ urban China as a strange montage in which the political memories of Tiananmen Square and the logic of the global capitalist marketplace are intertwined.

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Editorial Reviews

Ella Shohat
“The most lucid, complex and brilliant analysis of Fifth Generation film (indeed of the entire 'generations' phenomenon in the People's Republic of China) that I have ever seen. Dai Jinhua manages at the same time to connect with international currents in psychoanalytic feminist film criticism and to forward a grounded, 'new Marxist' Chinese school of thinking.”
Meaghan Morris
“In these luminously powerful essays on Chinese cinema, women's literature, and contemporary popular culture, Dai Jinhua achieves a new historiography. She shows us how to rethink the great themes of nationalism, colonialism, consumerist capitalism, and modernity itself. Moving, inspiring, and absorbing from beginning to end, Cinema and Desire is a landmark work by a major cultural critic.”
From the Publisher
“In these luminously powerful essays on Chinese cinema, women’s literature, and contemporary popular culture, Dai Jinhua achieves a new historiography. She shows us how to rethink the great themes of nationalism, colonialism, consumerist capitalism, and modernity itself. Moving, inspiring, and absorbing from beginning to end, Cinema and Desire is a landmark work by a major cultural critic”—Meaghan Morris, Lingen University, Hong Kong

“The most lucid, complex and brilliant analysis of Fifth Generation film (indeed of the entire ‘generations’ phenomenon in the People’s Republic of China) that I have ever seen. Dai Jinhua manages at the same time to connect with international currents in psychoanalytic feminist film criticism and to forward a grounded,‘new Marxist’ Chinese school of thinking.”—Ella Shohat, City University of New York

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781859842645
  • Publisher: Verso Books
  • Publication date: 9/17/2002
  • Pages: 292
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.66 (d)

Meet the Author

Dai Jinhua is Professor of Chinese Literature and Culture at Peking University, where she teaches women’s studies, cultural studies and film. She is the author of Breaking Out of the City of Mirrors and Film Theory and Handbook of Criticism.

Jing Wang is S.C. Fang Professor of Chinese Cultural Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is the author of High Culture Fever: Politics, Aesthetics and Ideology in Deng’s China.

Tani E. Barlow is a historian of modern China and teaches in the Women’s Studies Department at the University of Washington. She is the founding editor of positions: east Asia cultures critique and author of The Questions of Women in Chinese Feminism.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
1 Severed Bridge: The Art of the Sons' Generation 13
2 Postcolonialism and Chinese Cinema of the Nineties 49
3 A Scene in the Fog: Reading the Sixth Generation Films 71
4 Gender and Narration: Women in Contemporary Chinese Film 99
5 "Human, Woman, Demon": A Woman's Predicament 151
6 Redemption and Consumption: Depicting Culture in the 1990s 172
7 National Identity in the Hall of Mirrors 189
Invisible Writing: The Politics of Mass Culture in the 1990s 213
Rethinking the Cultural History of Chinese Film 235
Dia Jinhua: A Short Biography 264
Select Bibliographies 266
Notes on the Translators 275
Index 277
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