Cipher/Code Of Dishonor; Aaron Burr, An American Enigma

( 2 )

Overview

Trinity: The Burrs versus Alexander Hamilton and the United States of America will be the first book to draw on unreported documents and genealogical information to reveal an unprecedented look into the relationships of Aaron Burr, Alexander Hamilton, Trinity Church Corporation and the Loyalists of Manhattan Island. Author Alan J. Clark shows in new perspective the battles and intrigues leading beyond the American Revolutionary War. With the melding of genealogy and timeline analysis Clark examines some of the ...
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Overview

Trinity: The Burrs versus Alexander Hamilton and the United States of America will be the first book to draw on unreported documents and genealogical information to reveal an unprecedented look into the relationships of Aaron Burr, Alexander Hamilton, Trinity Church Corporation and the Loyalists of Manhattan Island. Author Alan J. Clark shows in new perspective the battles and intrigues leading beyond the American Revolutionary War. With the melding of genealogy and timeline analysis Clark examines some of the intriguing ciphered letters of Aaron Burr to his daughter Theodosia, and looks again at Burr's curious and complex war time exploits to determine where his Loyalist tendencies actually began. Clark further examines the land leases then traded prior, during, and after the war as speculation, or possibly as rewards from the English Crown for services performed in its favor in the colonies primarily through the Corporation of Trinity
Church. The economics of early Manhattan and the Atlantic colonies were bolstered by the complex and secular behavior of the Corporation of Trinity Church acting as land bank for the Loyalists to the Throne of England.
Clark appears to fill in the gaps in many recently published tomes by delving deeper into the actions of Burr and Hamilton, examining their extensive familial connections and behaviors to arrive at a complex web of intricacy bringing to life American History at its most personal level. This book does not reiterate the well worn paths of American History. Instead, it brings a crisp new approach that makes sense of seemingly insignificant, disjointed and inconsistent stories of the early history of our country.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781420846379
  • Publisher: AuthorHouse
  • Publication date: 6/30/2005
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 0.75 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2006

    History reinterpreted

    Based on facts little known or revealed elsewhere Clark, the author, advances a theory novel to American History that Aaron Burr was a loyalist throughout his life, even during the Revolutionary War, wherein he is most commonly thought an American hero. Using genealogy, land deeds and leases Clark finds connections to the British hitherto ignored by Historians. This book is not a rehash of current accepted American history. His interpretation of Aaron Burr's own coded letters in his published Memoirs fall in neatly with this theory. He gives new political meaning to the duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton beyond a trifling slight. He even points the reader toward an interpretation of current events with roots in the Loyalist American cause. This book will make you think that history may still be ripe for reinterpretation.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2009

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