Circle of Fire (American Girl History Mysteries Series #14)

Circle of Fire (American Girl History Mysteries Series #14)

4.2 5
by Evelyn Coleman, Laszlo Kubinyi, Jean-Paul Tibbles
     
 

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In 1958, 12-year-old Mendy Thompson discovers nighttime intruders in her secret forest clearing in Monteagle, Tennessee. They're members of the KKK and are plotting to bomb Highlander School during a speech by Mendy's hero, Eleanor Roosevelt. With no one to turn to, Mendy must find a way to stop the KKK herself.

Overview

In 1958, 12-year-old Mendy Thompson discovers nighttime intruders in her secret forest clearing in Monteagle, Tennessee. They're members of the KKK and are plotting to bomb Highlander School during a speech by Mendy's hero, Eleanor Roosevelt. With no one to turn to, Mendy must find a way to stop the KKK herself.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This latest installment to the "American Girl" series of "History Mysteries" will captivate readers. This is the compelling story of two young friends, Mendy and Jeffrey. They are having difficulty maintaining their long-time friendship in a southern town in Tennessee during 1958. Mendy Thompson is a young black girl. She has discovered that a group of men have been meeting in her secret hideaway in the woods near her home. One evening she hears their voices plotting and planning to take part in an awful scheme of hatred and violence. Jeffrey has been Mendy's best friend since they were toddlers. Jeffrey is white and his parents think it does not look good for him to be friends with Mendy. They have forbidden Jeffrey to see her. The two friends work through thoughts of betrayal and together, they thwart the plan of evil plotted by the men in the woods. Readers will love the realistic characters and will be riveted by the mystery and events of this dark past in America's history. Mendy and Jeffrey together prove that good always overcomes evil. A great message anytime. 2001, Pleasant Company, $9.95 and $5.95. Ages 9 to 12. Reviewer:Sue Reichard
VOYA
Twelve-year-old Mendy Thompson, growing up in Tennessee during the 1950s, must thwart the Ku Klux Klan's plot to kill her heroine, Eleanor Roosevelt. This sheltered African American main character has never heard of the Klan, seen its Circle of Fire, nor understood the taboo of interracial dating. She and her best friend, Jeffrey, who is white, confront prejudice and track the Klan members with help from Jeffrey's father, an FBI informant. Similar to Scholastic's Dear America series but without the journal format, the American Girl History Mysteries focus on historical events and anecdotal details. A full-color sketch of the world of the main character introduces each story. A nonfiction account explains the story's context. Providing inspiring content, idealistic themes, interesting plots, and happy endings, these books will be popular with middle school age girls and their parents. Illus. VOYA CODES:3Q 2P M (Readable without serious defects;For the YA with a special interest in the subject;Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8). 2001, American Girl/Pleasant Company, 150p, $5.95 Trade pb. Ages 11 to 14. Reviewer:Lucy Schall—VOYA, December 2001 (Vol. 24, No. 5)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584853398
Publisher:
American Girl Publishing
Publication date:
08/01/1901
Series:
American Girl History Mysteries Series, #14
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
5.68(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.37(d)
Lexile:
690L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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Circle of Fire 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
otulissa More than 1 year ago
This book was wonderful! yes it is very sad but also very true. Including Mendy's mother trying to keep things from her to protect her. You might think to not allow youe child to read this book because of the issues it deals with and that would make you like Mendy's mother. Meaning no harm of course but sometimes knowing is half the battle and when things are bad it is good for even little kids to know. Mendy is a loveable character and fun to follow as she takes you into her world. I'm a tom boy myself so I enjoyed reading about a character who loved to do the things I love. I recomend this book for all ages!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The ¿circle of Fire¿ was a scary book. It made me feel sad for the girl named Mendy too. It seemed like she had a lot of tough times. This book was scary because of the things that are happening in Mendy¿s life. That is why this book is scary! This book is about a girl named Mendy. Mendy has a secret place that she likes very much. But then she finds out there are people that come to her secret place. Now she needs to stop these people before they do something terrible! This was a good book and I think you should read it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this is a great book, even though a lot of tragic things happen. It really helps people understand how it felt to be an African-American girl growing up in the 1950's.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For those of you who didn't really like this book, is probably because you thought it was sad and unhappy. I have news for you-this happens to people everyday. So if you're looking for this book for your 10 or 11 year old daughter-get it. This adventure of Mandy and Jeffery is one they will never forget.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After reading the last few books in the series this one was more excitng than if I were to read after a book such as The Night Flyers or Under Copp's Hill. It was well written and full of suspence. The reason I give four stars is because there wasn't much of mystery to it. If you knew about this time period and the stuff going on in the area then you would probably figure things out wicked fast. This book was a little creepy, especially if your like me with your own freaky nieghbors. Because of some of the stuff in this book I would onlyrecomand it for middle schoolers, some of the stuff could freak out a young reader.