Cisco CCNA: Exam #640-507 Certification Guide

Overview

Cisco CCNA Exam #640-507 Certification Guide is a comprehensive study tool for CCNA Exam #640-507. Written by a CCIE and Certified Cisco Systems Instructor and reviewed by Cisco technical experts, this book helps you understand and master the material you will need to know to pass the exam. The instructor-developed elements and techniques lead you to maximize your retention and recall of exam topics, and scenario-based exercises will validate your mastery of the topics you will encounter on the exam. Along with ...
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Overview

Cisco CCNA Exam #640-507 Certification Guide is a comprehensive study tool for CCNA Exam #640-507. Written by a CCIE and Certified Cisco Systems Instructor and reviewed by Cisco technical experts, this book helps you understand and master the material you will need to know to pass the exam. The instructor-developed elements and techniques lead you to maximize your retention and recall of exam topics, and scenario-based exercises will validate your mastery of the topics you will encounter on the exam. Along with the book, practice questions on the companion CD-ROM enable you either to build and take random sample tests or to focus on a topic area of your choice.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735709713
  • Publisher: Cisco Press
  • Publication date: 4/13/2000
  • Series: CCNA Certification and Training Series
  • Edition description: 2nd
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 818
  • Product dimensions: 7.54 (w) x 9.42 (h) x 2.14 (d)

Meet the Author


Wendell Odom is the Technology Director of Lacidar Unlimited, Inc., a networking consulting and training company in Atlanta, Georgia. In this role, Wendell provides both expert advice about many aspects of building networks, and full design and implementation assistance for large projects. Wendell is CCIE #1624 and a Certified Cisco Systems Instructor, and has taught various Cisco certification courses including Introduction to Cisco Router Configuration (ICRC), Advanced Cisco Router Configuration (ACRC), Cisco SNA for Multiprotocol Administrators (SNAM), Cisco Channel Interface Processor (CIP), and Cisco ATM (CATM). Wendell is one of the first Cisco instructors certified without a probationary testing period, and is the first non-Cisco instructor in the U.S. to teach Cisco's SNAM, CIP, and DLSw courses.
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Read an Excerpt


Chapter 6: Routing

IPX RIP, SAP, and GNS

To be a successful CCNA, you must know the differences between IPX RIP and IP RIP, but also two other NetWare protocols used by the router, namely Service Advertisement Protocol (SAP) and Get Nearest Server (GNS). Because IPX RIP and IP RIP were originally based on the same protocol (XNS RIP), the two are very similar. SAP and GNS have no equivalent feature in TCP/IP. RIP for IPX works in a similar manner to IP RIP. The most obvious difference is that IPX RIP advertises IPX network numbers, not IP subnet numbers.

IPX RIP uses two metrics: ticks and hops. Ticks are 1/18 of one second; the metric is an integer counter of the number of ticks delay for this route. By default, a Cisco router treats a link as having a certain number of ticks delay. LAN interfaces default to one tick, and WAN interfaces default to six ticks. The number of hops is considered only when the number of ticks is a tie. By using ticks as the primary metric, better routes can be chosen, as opposed to using just hop count. For example, a three-hop, three-tick route that uses three Ethernets will be chosen over a two-hop, eight-tick route that uses two Ethernets and a serial link.

Service Advertisement Protocol

Service Advertisement Protocol (SAP) is one of the more important parts of the NetWare protocol specification, but it is also one of the biggest challenges when trying to scale an IPX network. SAP is used by servers to propagate information that describes their services. CCNAs are expected to be very familiar with SAP and the routers' roles in forwarding SAP information.

The SAP process is very much like the process used by a distance vector routing protocol. In fact, SAP uses a concept similar to split horizon to stop a node from advertising SAP information it learned on an interface with updates sent out that same interface. Each server sends SAP updates, by default every 60 seconds, that include its IPX address, server name, and service type. Every other server and router listens for these updates, but does not forward the SAP packet(s). Instead, the SAP information is added to a SAP table in the server or router; then the packets are discarded. When that router or server's SAP timer expires, then new SAP broadcasts are sent. As with IPX RIP for routing information, IPX SAP propagates service information until all servers and routers have learned about all servers.

Client initialization flows provide some insight into why routers need to learn SAP information. Consider Figure 6-14, which includes the use of the Get Nearest Server (GNS) request and shows a typical startup with a client configured with a preferred server of Server 2.

The overall goal of client1 is to log in to its preferred server, Server 2. The first step is to connect to some server that has a full SAP table, so the client can learn the IPX address of its preferred server. (The preferred server name is configured on the client, not the IPX address of the preferred server.) The router may know the preferred server's name and IPX address in its SAP table, but there is no IPX message defined that allows the client to query the router for "name resolution." However, an IPX broadcast message asking for any nearby server is defined by IPX-the GNS request. The router can supply the IPX address of some nearby server (Step 2 in Figure 6-14) because the router has a SAP table.

Next, the client needs to learn which router to use to forward packets to the server discovered by its GNS request. RIP requests and replies are used by the client to learn the route from any router (or server) on the same LAN, as seen in Steps 3 and 4 in Figure 6-14. As a result, client1 knows to use the LA router to deliver packets to network 1001.

After connecting to Server 1, the client learns the IPX address of Server 2, its preferred server (Steps 5 and 6 in Figure 6-14). The client needs to know the best route to the preferred server's network; therefore, a RIP request and reply to learn the best next-hop router to network 1002 is shown in Steps 7 and 8 in Figure 6-14. Finally, packets are sent between the client and Server 2 so that the client can log in; the intervening routers are simply routing the packets.

Note that IPX clients create their own IPX address using the network number in the source address field of the GNS reply. The GNS reply is always sent by a router or server on the same network as the client. The client examines the source IPX address of the GNS reply to learn its own IPX network number. The complete client IPX address is formed by putting that network number with the MAC address of the client's LAN interface...

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Table of Contents

Introduction
Ch. 1 All About the Cisco Certified Network Associate Certification 2
Ch. 2 Cisco Internetwork Operating System (IOS) Fundamentals 20
Ch. 3 OSI Reference Model & Layered Communication 68
Ch. 4 Bridges/Switches and LAN Design 128
Ch. 5 Network Protocols 210
Ch. 6 Routing 352
Ch. 7 Understanding Access List Security 454
Ch. 8 WAN Protocols and Design 514
Ch. 9 Scenarios for Final Preparation 638
App. A Answers to the "Do I Know This Already?" Quizzes and Q&A Sections 700
App. B Decimal to Hexadecimal and Binary Conversion Table 776
Index 786
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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2001

    Good book

    I liked this one. I helped me cover areas where my hands-on experience was lacking - filled in the gaps. Passed the test, first try.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2001

    A Tough Read, do not recommend

    This book is definately a tough read and i don't recommend it at all especially if youare starting out with routers, this book just doesn't speak enhlish and gets you tired and frustrated.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2001

    Technically immense but poorly written

    This book fails to communicate efficiently. The writing is all over the place with no focus. I absolutely do not recommend this book for a study guide.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2000

    Pretty good test prep.

    I purchased this book right after it was released to prepare for the CCNA 2.0. The book more than covered everything on the test. My only complaint is that the practice exams inculuded on the CD didn't cover the basics well enough (as the test does.)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2000

    Great Book with a great practice exam included; 210+ questions

    I actually teach a bootcamp to prepare students for the CCNA exam and this is the best book there is. It may be a tough read for people with no router background, but it is the best book available. The Sybex book is good too and a much easier read. The 216 question practice exam is simply the best set of practice questions available for this exam - BAR NONE; and is worth the price of this book by itself.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2000

    Cisco CCNA: Exam #640-507 Certification Guide

    While this book might be effective, it certainly is not efficiently prepare you for the exam. Mostly because this book is too technical for mere CCNA and the exam is not that hard at all. In that context, this book will present false idea of the exam. Beside, this book will drain your energy unnecesarily simply because book is terribly written. To become ccna certified efficiently and effectively, stay away from this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2000

    Cisco CCNA: Exam #640-507 Certification Guide

    What a terrible guide. This is a really waste of time to read. CCNA exam is not this hard. You don't need these tech talks and jargons at all. Unless you're really bored with absolutely nothing to do, this guide is not worth to read. Don't expect to make you prepared for the exam. I don't guarantee the failure with this guide but I guarantee this guide is a tough read (makes you tired).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2000

    Decent book for the exam

    This is an excellent book for the exam. I used this book along with the companion book in the set, which is the equivalent of the ICND course. There is quite a bit of information in the book and you really need to know all of the little details to pass the test. I just passed the CCNA exam today with an 860. I would definitely recommend this book along with the wealth of free practice exams you can find on the Internet.

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

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