Cisco IOS 12.0 Network Security

Cisco IOS 12.0 Network Security

by Cisco Systems, Inc.
     
 

Creating and maintaining secure network environments continues to be of utmost importance for administrators and engineers today. Cisco IOS 12.0 Network Security is the definitive resource for both dial-in and local users. Through the use of real-world examples, you will discover the most current security technologies available and learn how to implement and support… See more details below

Overview

Creating and maintaining secure network environments continues to be of utmost importance for administrators and engineers today. Cisco IOS 12.0 Network Security is the definitive resource for both dial-in and local users. Through the use of real-world examples, you will discover the most current security technologies available and learn how to implement and support these technologies on a network.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781578701605
Publisher:
Cisco Press
Publication date:
06/23/1999
Series:
Cisco Ios Software Solutions Series
Edition description:
UPDATED
Pages:
960
Product dimensions:
7.76(w) x 9.46(h) x 2.51(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: AAA Overview

Access control is the way you control who is allowed access to the network server and what services they are allowed to use once they have access. Authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) network security services provide the primary framework through which you set up access control on your router or access server.

AAA Security Services

AAA is an architectural framework for configuring a set of three independent security functions in a consistent manner. AAA provides a modular way of performing the following services:

  • Authentication-Provides the method of identifying users, including login and password dialog, challenge and response, messaging support, and, depending on the security protocol you select, encryption

    Authentication is the way a user is identified prior to being allowed access to the network and network services. You configure AAA authentication by defining a named list of authentication methods, and then applying that list to various interfaces. The method list defines the types of authentication to be performed and the sequence in which they will be performed; it must be applied to a specific interface before any of the defined authentication methods will be performed. The only exception is the default method list (which is named default). The default method list is automatically applied to all interfaces if no other method list is defined. A defined method list overrides the default method list.

    All authentication methods, except for local, line password, and enable authentication, must be defined through AAA. For information about configuring all authentication methods, including thoseimplemented outside of the AAA security services, refer to Chapter 2, "Configuring Authentication."

  • Authorization-Provides the method for remote access control, including one-time authorization or authorization for each service, per-user account list and profile, user group support, and support of IP, IPX, ARA, and Telnet.

    AAA authorization works by assembling a set of attributes that describe what the user is authorized to perform. These attributes are compared to the information contained in a database for a given user and the result is returned to AAA to determine the user's actual capabilities and restrictions. The database can be located locally on the access server or router or it can be hosted remotely on a RADIUS or TACACS+ security server. Remote security servers, such as RADIUS and TACACS+, authorize users for specific rights by associating attribute-value (AV) pairs, which define those rights, with the appropriate user. All authorization methods must be defined through AAA.

    As with authentication, you configure AAA authorization by defining a named list of authorization methods, and then applying that list to various interfaces. For information about configuring authorization using AAA, refer to Chapter 4, "Configuring Authorization."

  • Accounting-Provides the method for collecting and sending security server information used for billing, auditing, and reporting, such as user identities, start and stop times, executed commands (such as PPP), number of packets, and number of bytes.

    Accounting enables you to track the services users are accessing as well as the amount of network resources they are consuming. When AAA accounting is activated, the network access server reports user activity to the TACACS+ or RADIUS security server (depending on which security method you have implemented) in the form of accounting records. Each accounting record is comprised of accounting AV pairs and is stored on the access control server. This data can then be analyzed for network management, client billing, and/or auditing. All accounting methods must be defined through AAA. As with authentication and authorization, you configure AAA accounting by defining a named list of accounting methods, and then applying that list to various interfaces. For information about configuring accounting using AAA, refer to Chapter 6, "Configuring Accounting."

In many circumstances, AAA uses protocols such as RADIUS, TACACS+, and Kerberos to administer its security functions. If your router or access server is acting as a network access server, AAA is the means through which you establish communication between your network access server and your RADIUS, TACACS+, or Kerberos security server.

Although AAA is the primary (and recommended) method for access control, Cisco IOS software provides additional features for simple access control that are outside the scope of AAA, such as local username authentication, line password authentication, and enable password authentication. However, these features do not provide the same degree of access control that is possible by using AAA.

Benefits of Using AAA

AAA provides the following benefits:

  • Increased flexibility and control

  • Scalability

  • Standardized authentication methods, such as RADIUS, TACACS+, and Kerberos

  • Multiple backup systems

NOTE The deprecated protocols, TACACS and extended TACACS, are not compatible with AAA; if you select these security protocols, you will not be able to take advantage of the AAA security services.

The AAA Philosophy

AAA is designed to enable you to dynamically configure the type of authentication and authorization you want on a per-line (per-user) or per-service (for example, IP, IPX, or VPDN) basis. You define the type of authentication and authorization you want by creating method lists and then applying those method lists to specific services or interfaces.

Method Lists

A method list is a list defining the authentication methods to be used, in sequence, to authenticate a user. Method lists enable you to designate one or more security protocols to be used for authentication, thus ensunng a backup system for authentication in case the initial method fails. Cisco IOS software uses the first method listed to authenticate users; if that method does not respond, the Cisco IOS software selects the next authentication method that appears in the method list. This process continues until there is successful communication with a listed authentication method or the authentication method list is exhausted, in which case authentication fails.

NOTE: The Cisco IOS software attempts authentication with the next listed authentication method only when there is no response from the previous method. If authentication fails at any point in this cycle-meaning that the security server or local username database responds by denying the user access-the authentication process stops and no other authentication methods are attempted.

Where to Begin

You must first decide what kind of security solution you want to implement. You need to assess the security risks in your particular network and decide on the appropriate means to prevent unauthorized entry and attack. Cisco recommends that you use AAA, no matter how minor your security needs might be.

Overview of the AAA Configuration Process

Configuring AAA is relatively simple when you understand the basic process involved. To configure security on a Cisco router or access server using AAA, follow this process:

    1. Enable AAA by using the aaa new-model global configuration command.

    2. If you decide to use a separate security server, configure security protocol parameters, such as RADIUS, TACACS+, or Kerberos.

    3. Define the method lists for authentication by using the aaa authentication command.

    4. Apply the method lists to a particular interface or line, if required.

    5. (Optional) Configure authorization by using the aaa authorization command.

    6. (Optional) Configure accounting by using the aaa accounting command.

For a complete description of the commands used in this chapter, refer to Chapter 3, "Authentication Commands." To locate documentation of other commands that appear in this chapter, you can search online at www.cisco.com....

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