Cisco Networking Academy Program : First-Year Companion Guide, Revised Edition with CDROM

Cisco Networking Academy Program : First-Year Companion Guide, Revised Edition with CDROM

by Vito Amato, Cisco Systems Inc, Wayne Lewis
     
 
Cisco Networking Academy Program: First-Year Companion Guide, Revised Printing, is the Cisco-approved textbook for Semesters 1 and 2 of the Cisco Networking Academy Program (CNAP) online curriculum. This textbook completes your online learning experience by providing easily accessible printed course material that tracks to Version 2.1 of the online curriculum.

Overview

Cisco Networking Academy Program: First-Year Companion Guide, Revised Printing, is the Cisco-approved textbook for Semesters 1 and 2 of the Cisco Networking Academy Program (CNAP) online curriculum. This textbook completes your online learning experience by providing easily accessible printed course material that tracks to Version 2.1 of the online curriculum. Specifically developed to help maximize your training time both on and away from the computer, First-Year Companion Guide, Revised Printing, is the ideal tool for students on the go.

This newly revised printing includes extensive appendixes that incorporate the new topics from Version 2.1 of the online curriculum. New appendixes on computer basics and network troubleshooting and expanded sections on physics, electricity, and binary and hexadecimal conversion lay the groundwork for networking comprehension with Version 2.1 of the online curriculum. The mapping guide tracks to multiple versions of the online curriculum, making topics and assignments easy to find even if you are using an earlier version of the curriculum. Includes helpful features to increase your knowledge:

  • Chapter objectives provide references to the concepts covered in the chapter
  • Hands-on projects prepare you for real-world situations
  • Review questions at the end of each chapter help track your progress and focus your study
  • Cross-referenced interactive Quicklime movies complement both the printed and online material and serve as valuable learning reference materials
  • Cross-referenced Command Summary adds to your understanding of the commands used to configure Cisco routers
Cisco Press is the only publisher that is endorsedand recommended by Cisco Systems. The Cisco Networking Academy Program: First-Year Companion Guide, Revised Printing, is developed by the same professionals who create the online curriculum and prepare the questions on the CCNA exam and acts as an excellent study guide and lasting resource.

Cisco Press is a collaboration between Cisco Systems, Inc., and Pearson Education that is charged with developing high-quality, cutting-edge educational and reference products for the networking industry. The products in the Cisco Networking Academy Program series are designed to prepare students for careers in the exciting networking field. George Ward (team leader and senior engineer), Dennis Frezzo, Jai Gosine, Alex Belous, and David Alexander wrote the online curriculum.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781587130038
Publisher:
Cisco Press
Publication date:
05/09/2000
Series:
Cisco Networking Academy Program Series
Edition description:
REVISED, BOOK & CD-ROM
Pages:
528
Product dimensions:
8.17(w) x 9.55(h) x 1.25(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt


Chapter 1: Networking and The OSI Reference Model

Introduction

In this chapter, you will learn about important networking terms and concepts. In addition, you will learn about two different types of networks: Local-area networks (LANs), which make it possible for businesses using computer technology to efficiently share such things as files and printers m Wide-area networks (WANs), which make it possible for businesses to communicate with each other even though they are geographically distant from each other Finally, you will learn about the Open System Interconnection (OSI) reference model and the communication process between the lower layers of the OSI reference model.

Networking

Networking is the interconnection of workstations, peripherals (such as printers, hard drives, scanners, and CD-ROMs), and other devices. In networking, it is possible for different types of computers to communicate. It is not important what type of computer is used on a network. It may be a Macintosh, a PC, or a mainframe. In networking, what is important is that all the devices speak the same language, or protocol, which is a formal description of a set of rules and conventions that govern how devices on a network exchange information. For example, if a group of people are assigned to work as a team to complete a project, it does not matter if those people are French, German, Italian, American, Chinese, or Mexican. What is important is that they be able to communicate through a common language. In today's world, the team most likely would speak English. In computing, a protocol would function like English in this example because, like English, the protocol is a common language that can be understood by all devices on a network.

Why and How Did Networking Start?

Early computers were standalone devices. In other words, each computer operated on its own, independently from other computers. It soon became apparent that this was not an efficient or cost-effective way for businesses to operate. A solution was needed that would successfully address three problems:

  • Duplication of equipment and resources
  • Inability to communicate efficiently
  • Lack of network management
Two solutions that addressed these three problems were LANs and WANs. LANs LANs connect workstations, peripherals, terminals, and other devices. LANs make it possible for businesses using computer technology to efficiently share such things as files and printers. As a result, a business can use a LAN to tie together its data, communication, computing, and file servers. LANs are designed to
  • Operate within a limited geographic area
  • Allow many users to access high-bandwidth media
  • Provide full-time connectivity to local services
Connect physically adjacent devices WANs As businesses began to use computers more and more, however, it soon became apparent that even LANs were not sufficient. In a LAN system, each department or business was an electronic island.

Businesses needed a way to move information efficiently and quickly from one LAN to another. The solution was the creation of WANs. WAlVs interconnect LANs to provide access to computers or file servers in other locations. Because WANs connect networks that serve users across a large geographic area, they make it possible for businesses to communicate with each other even though they are geographically distant.

By networking or connecting computers, printers, and other devices on a WAN so they can communicate with each other, as shown in Figure 1-1, it is possible to share information and resources, as well as to access the Internet.

The Need for Standards

During the past two decades there has been a tremendous expansion of WANs. As organizations realized how much money they could save and how much productivity they could gain by using network technology, they began adding networks and expanding existing networks almost as rapidly as new network technologies and products were introduced. Consequently, many of the networks were built using different hardware and software implementations...

Meet the Author


Vito Amato is the series editor of the Cisco Networking Academy Program series and coauthored Que E&T's An Interactive Guide to the Internet.

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