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Cisco TelePresence Fundamentals (Fundamentals Series)

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Overview

Cisco TelePresence™ Systems (CTS) create live, face-to-face meeting experiences, providing a breakthrough virtual conferencing and collaboration experience that transcends anything previously achievable by videoconferencing. Although the business case for deploying CTS is compelling, implementing it requires advanced knowledge of the latest networking technologies, an attention to detail, and thorough planning. In this book, four leading CTS technical experts cover everything you need to know to successfully ...

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Cisco TelePresence Fundamentals

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Overview

Cisco TelePresence™ Systems (CTS) create live, face-to-face meeting experiences, providing a breakthrough virtual conferencing and collaboration experience that transcends anything previously achievable by videoconferencing. Although the business case for deploying CTS is compelling, implementing it requires advanced knowledge of the latest networking technologies, an attention to detail, and thorough planning. In this book, four leading CTS technical experts cover everything you need to know to successfully design and deploy CTS in your environment.

The authors cover every element of a working CTS solution: video, audio, signaling protocols and call processing, LAN and WAN design, multipoint, security, inter-company connectivity, and much more. They deliver start-to-finish coverage of CTS design for superior availability, QoS support, and security in converged networks. They also present the first chapter-length design guide of it’s kind detailing the room requirements and recommendations for lighting, acoustics, and ambience within various types of TelePresence rooms.

Cisco Telepresence Fundamentals is an indispensable resource for all technical professionals tasked with deploying CTS, including netadmins, sysadmins, audio/video specialists, VoIP specialists, and operations staff. This is the only book that:

  • Introduces every component of a complete CTS solution and shows how they work together
  • Walks through connecting CTS in real-world environments
  • Demonstrates how to secure virtual meetings using Cisco firewalls and security protocols
  • Includes a full chapter on effective TelePresence room design
  • Walks through every aspect of SIP call signaling design, including both single-cluster and intercluster examples for use in a TelePresence environment
  • Provides prequalification, room, and network path assessment considerations to help you anticipate and avoid problems

Tim Szigeti, CCIE® No. 9794, technical leader within the Cisco® Enterprise Systems Engineering team, is responsible for defining Cisco TelePresence network deployment best practices. He also coauthored the Cisco Press book End-to-End QoS Network Design. Kevin McMenamy, senior manager of technical marketing in the Cisco TelePresence Systems Business Unit, has spent the past nine years at Cisco supporting IP videoconferencing, video telephony, and unified communications. Roland Saville, technical leader for the Cisco Enterprise Systems Engineering team, tests and develops best-practice design guides for Cisco TelePresence enterprise deployments. Alan Glowacki is a Cisco technical marketing engineer responsible for supporting Cisco TelePresence customers and sales teams.

  • Use Cisco TelePresence Systems (CTS) to enhance global teamwork and collaboration, both within your own enterprise and with your customers, partners, and vendors
  • Understand how the various components of the Cisco TelePresence Solution connect and work together
  • Integrate CTS into existing LAN, enterprise, and service provider networks
  • Successfully design and deploy a global TelePresence network
  • Understand the importance of room dimensions, acoustics, lighting, and ambience and how to properly design the physical room environment
  • Provide the high levels of network availability CTS requires
  • Leverage the Cisco quality of service (QoS) tools most relevant to CTS network provisioning and deployment
  • Systematically secure CTS using TLS, dTLS, sRTP, SSH, and Cisco firewalls

This book is part of the Cisco Press® Fundamentals Series. Books in this series introduce networking professionals to new networking technologies, covering network topologies, sample deployment concepts, protocols, and management techniques.

Category: IP Communications

Covers: Cisco TelePresence Systems

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781587055935
  • Publisher: Cisco Press
  • Publication date: 6/10/2009
  • Series: Fundamentals Series
  • Pages: 624
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Tim Szigeti, CCIE No. 9794, is a technical leader at Cisco within the Enterprise Systems Engineering (ESE) team, where he has spent the last decade specializing in quality of service technologies. His current role is to design network architectures for the next wave of media applications, including TelePresence, IP video surveillance, digital media systems, and desktop video. He has coauthored many technical papers, including the Cisco Enterprise QoS Design Guide and the Cisco TelePresence Network Systems Design Guide, and the Cisco Press book End-to-End QoS Network Design. Tim holds a bachelor of Commerce degree in management information systems from the University of British Columbia.

Kevin McMenamy is senior manager of technical marketing in the Cisco TelePresence Systems Business Unit (TSBU). Kevin has been doing technical marketing at Cisco since February 2000, focused primarily on voice- and video-related technologies, including Cisco IP/TV, Cisco H.323 video conferencing, Cisco IP Telephony, and Unified Communications, and now Cisco TelePresence. Prior to Cisco, Kevin worked at FVC.COM, which manufactured H.321 video conferencing solutions, and at Winnov L.L.P, which manufactured the video capture cards used in the Cisco IP/TV streaming servers and in PCs for Microsoft’s NetMeeting and WhitePine Software’s CUCME applications. Kevin has filed several U.S. patents with Cisco on voice and video signaling and security concepts and has coauthored and contributed to numerous technical papers including the Cisco IP Videoconferencing Design Guide, the Cisco IP Video Telephony Design Guide, the Cisco IP Telephony Design Guide, the Cisco Quality of Service Design Guide, the Cisco SAFE Blueprint, Cisco CallManager Fundamentals, and most recently the Cisco TelePresence Network Systems Design Guide.

Roland Saville is a technical leader within the Cisco Enterprise Systems Engineering (ESE) team. For the past 13 years at Cisco, he has focused on a broad range of technology areas, including VoIP, security, wireless, RFID, and TelePresence as a systems engineer, consulting systems engineer, and technical marketing engineer. He has coauthored many technical papers including the Cisco SAFE Blueprint documents, Cisco TelePresence Network Systems Design Guide, and several U.S. patents relating to RFID technology. Roland holds a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from the University of Idaho and a master of business administration from Santa Clara University.

Alan Glowacki is a technical marketing engineer in the TelePresence Systems Business Unit (TSBU). Alan has been working on video communications since 1995 when he joined First Virtual Communications as employee number 20. After five years with First Virtual Communications, Alan joined Cisco, focusing on H.323 video conferencing. During his time with Cisco, he authored many technical papers including the first H.323 Videoconferencing Solution Reference Design Guide. After three and a half years with Cisco, he left to try another startup only to return to Cisco in 2006. Upon his return to Cisco, Alan returned his focus to video by joining the TSBU.

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Read an Excerpt

Cisco TelePresence FundamentalsCisco TelePresence FundamentalsIntroduction

I well remember my first Cisco TelePresence experience.

It was in the fall of 2006, and my manager had been urging me for several weeks to check out the first pair of production TelePresence rooms at the Executive Briefing Center at the Cisco headquarters in San Jose. However, I had kept putting it off because I was “too busy.” Being familiar with many forms and flavors of video conferencing systems, I was a bit skeptical that there was really anything new or cool enough to merit my walking seven buildings over and seeing for myself. But eventually I relented and made the arduous ten-minute trek, and my life hasn’t been the same since.

It’s difficult to encapsulate in words how authentic TelePresence is; it just has to be experienced firsthand to really “get it.” But I distinctly remember looking at a life-size image of a colleague on the high-definition screen and seeing the second hand on his watch tick in real time and thinking, “This can change everything.” And indeed it has and is continuing to do so.

The Cisco company vision has been and continues to be, “changing the way we work, live, play, and learn,” and never has a single technology (since perhaps IP itself) had such a cross-functional impact and potential as Cisco TelePresence.

TelePresence quite literally changes the way we work. I can personally attest to this because for the past decade, I had been traveling on average two to three times per month: wasting hundreds of hours in airport lines and lounges, spending tens of thousands of company dollars per year, and burning who knows how many tons of fossil fuels. Now, I walk to the nearest TelePresence room and conduct meetings with colleagues and customers alike and then walk home, simultaneously saving time, money, and the environment.

TelePresence is also changing the way we live. For instance, many Cisco employees usually have at least some members of their families living far away from them. In recent years, during holiday seasons, Cisco has invited employees and their families to book their respectively nearest TelePresence rooms (of which several hundred have been deployed globally) and “visit” with each other. Ongoing research and development is aimed at bringing TelePresence into the home, which would bring all of us closer to our distant friends and families, without having to even leave the couch.

Similarly, TelePresence is changing the way we play. Recent initiatives in the sports and entertainment fields have seen the introduction of TelePresence in various sports venues, allowing for distant friends to “trash talk” while watching a game or for fans to “visit” with their heroes, even though distances of thousands of miles might physically separate the parties.

And finally, TelePresence is changing the way we learn. Geographically disparate teachers and students are meeting and interacting with a degree of ease and effectiveness as never before. Classrooms on opposite ends of the planet are linked together through TelePresence, giving students a broader cultural exposure and a better global perspective.

And the list of ways TelePresence technologies can be applied goes on and on....

And so, in short, I was hooked. Soon after, I was honored and excited to join a cross-functional team of experts, including Kevin, Roland, Alan, and many others, who were tasked with researching and developing Cisco TelePresence solutions.

Shortly thereafter, a social incident further underscored to me the universal appeal of TelePresence. For years, my wife and I had an understanding that at dinner parties, if people asked me what I do, I was permitted to reply with “I’m in computers” and leave it at that. If I was pressed, I could expand with “I design networks for computers,” but no further. Otherwise, according to her, if I launched into the technical details of my day-to-day work (which I always thought was interesting), people’s eyes would glaze over with sheer boredom, and they would politely nod with feigned interest, and secretly wish they never asked, and made quick mental notes never to invite us again. However, one evening, after having been assigned to work on TelePresence designs for about a year, I found myself at a dinner party with an elderly gentleman next to me asking me what I did. I replied with the usual permitted one-liner, but as he pressed me for more, I quickly glanced at my wife, saw the shooting look of warning in her eye, gathered up some courage, and defiantly began launching into the detailed work we had been doing on TelePresence. To my amazement, he seemed not only interested, but also excited about some of the possibilities for TelePresence. And it wasn’t long before the whole table of eight began joining in the animated conversation, talking about TelePresence solutions and potentials at length, at the end of which, I shot a triumphantly victorious look back at my wife, and the rules have been permanently relaxed since.

Back at work, our team immediately started doing research and testing to publish a series of technical papers on best practices for deploying TelePresence systems, and only then did we really begin to grasp how many layers of technology were actually involved in TelePresence solutions, from audio to video to codecs to networks to firewalls to border controllers and so on and so forth. The papers became longer and longer, and we then recognized that having a single depository of such technical information would require a book. And after nearly two more years of work, you hold the result in your hands.

Objectives and Approach

The objectives of this book are to introduce you to Cisco TelePresence technologies, both at a conceptual level and at a technical design and deployment level.

To realize this objective, this book is divided into three main parts:

  • The first introduces and overviews Cisco TelePresence systems.
  • The second delves into the concepts of the various technologies that comprise TelePresence systems and networks.
  • The third details best practice design recommendations on how these technologies are integrated and optimally deployed as comprehensive Cisco TelePresence solutions.

Upon completion, you should have a solid working knowledge of Cisco TelePresence systems and technologies and thus can confidently design, deploy, operate, and manage Cisco TelePresence solutions.

Who Should Read This Book?

The primary group of readers for this book would be technical staff tasked with deploying Cisco TelePresence systems. These might include network administrators, systems administrators, audio/video specialists, VoIP specialists, and operations staff.

A secondary group of readers would be technical decision makers tasked with evaluating the business value and technical feasibility of deploying Cisco TelePresence systems.

A tertiary group of readers would be system engineers, partners, trainers, and other networking professionals who might need to ramp-up technically on Cisco TelePresence systems, with the objective of selling or educating others on these systems.

How This Book Is Organized

This book is organized in such a manner that it can be read cover-to-cover and be used as a quick reference guide to specific technical information and design recommendations.

The content is broken into three main sections: the first section introduces Cisco TelePresence; the second section expands on the various technologies that play a role in TelePresence systems and networks; and the third section describes the Cisco validated best practice recommendations to optimally deploy TelePresence solutions.

The two chapters comprising Part 1, “Introducing Cisco TelePresence,” cover the following topics:

  • Chapter 1, “What Is TelePresence”: This chapter introduces Cisco TelePresence, by tracing the evolution of video communications from the 1964 World’s Fair to 2006, when Cisco released their first TelePresence system, which featured state-of-the-art technologies designed to transport high-definition audio and video, in realtime, over a converged IP network infrastructure.
  • Chapter 2, “Cisco TelePresence Solution Overview”: This chapter overviews the various components that comprise Cisco TelePresence systems and solutions, including the Cisco TelePresence codec (which is the heart of Cisco TelePresence systems), the Cisco 7975 Series IP Phone, the Cisco Unified Communications Manager, the Cisco TelePresence Manager, the Cisco TelePresence Multipoint Switch, and the Cisco TelePresence Intercompany Solution.

The five chapters comprising Part II, “TelePresence Technologies,” discuss the following topics:

  • Chapter 3, “TelePresence Audio and Video Technologies”: This chapter delves into more detail on how the Cisco TelePresence codec interacts with the high-definition displays and cameras, microphones and speakers, the IP Phones, auxiliary components, and, most importantly, the network. Audio/video encoding and packetization are extensively discussed, as are the effects of latency, jitter, and loss on TelePresence flows.
  • Chapter 4, “Connecting TelePresence Systems”: This chapter details how individual components interconnect and interrelate within Cisco TelePresence systems. Additionally, the three main TelePresence deployment models, intracampus, intra-enterprise and Intercompany, are described.
  • Chapter 5, “Network Availability Technologies”: This chapter presents a foundational context for the best practice designs detailed in Chapter 9, “TelePresence Network Design Part 1: Availability Design,” by introducing concepts and metrics relating to network availability for TelePresence deployments. A broad spectrum of availability technologies are overviewed, including device, network, and operational availability technologies.
  • Chapter 6, “Network Quality of Service Technologies”: This chapter lays a base for the validated designs detailed in Chapter 10, “TelePresence Network Design Part 2: QoS Design,” by introducing concepts and metrics relating to network quality of service for TelePresence deployments. Various quality of service tools are overviewed, including classification, marking, policing, shaping, queuing, and dropping tools.
  • Chapter 7, “TelePresence Control and Security Protocols”: This chapter provides background for the the designs detailed in Chapter 11, “TelePresence Firewall Design,” and Chapter 12, “TelePresence Call-Signaling Design,” by introducing concepts and technologies relating to signaling, control, and security design for TelePresence deployments.

The technical substance of this book is in the second half, specifically in the seven chapters comprising Part III “TelePresence Solution Design,” which detail the following topics:

  • Chapter 8, “TelePresence Room Design”: This chapter describes topics that are rarely covered in Cisco Press books and that many networking professionals might be unfamiliar with but nonetheless are critical to properly designing rooms to support Cisco TelePresence, including wall, floor, and ceiling surfaces; lighting and illumination; acoustics; and heating, ventilation, air-conditioning. and power.
  • Chapter 9, “TelePresence Network Design Part 1: Availability Design”: This chapter details network considerations, targets, and design recommendations for highly available TelePresence networks. Campus designs include virtual switch designs and both EIGRP- and OSPF-routed access designs; branch designs include both dual-tier and multitier branch profiles.
  • Chapter 10, “TelePresence Network Design Part 2: QoS Design”: This chapter details network considerations, targets, and design recommendations for QoS-enabled TelePresence networks. The service level requirements of TelePresence are specified in terms of bandwidth, burst, latency, jitter, and loss. QoS designs for campus networks are detailed, as are WAN/branch and MPLS VPN networks.
  • Chapter 11, “TelePresence Firewall Design”: This chapter outlines firewall design options for TelePresence deployments. Protocol requirements are examined for TelePresence scheduling, signaling, media, and management flows.
  • Chapter 12, “TelePresence Call-Signaling Design”: This chapter examines TelePresence call-signaling components, including the Cisco Unified Communications Manager, Cisco Unified Border Element and Cisco Session Border Controller, and TelePresence signaling operation and design.
  • Chapter 13, “Multipoint TelePresence Design”: This chapter expands the complexity of TelePresence deployments by introducing the Cisco TelePresence Multipoint Switch, which enables up to 48 TelePresence segments to be joined together in a single conference. Additionally, this chapter examines the network design implications of TelePresence multipoint deployments.
  • Chapter 14, “Inter-Company TelePresence Design”: This chapter applies Metcalfe’s Law to TelePresence deployments by introducing a solution that enables one business to place TelePresence calls to another, namely the Cisco TelePresence Inter-Company Solution. The end-to-end requirements of this solution are specified, including quality, security, scalability, and reliability. The components of the Inter-Company solution are analyzed, with emphasis on the Cisco Session Border Controller and Cisco Unified Border Element. Additionally, the network architecture and security of the Inter-Company solution are examined in depth.

Finally, this book concludes with the Appendix, “Protocols Used in Cisco TelePresence Solutions.” This appendix summarizes and details the many network protocols used by Cisco TelePresence Systems.

Tim Szigeti March 2009

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Introduction xix

Part I: Introducing Cisco Telepresence 3

Chapter 1 What Is Telepresence? 5

Evolution of Video Communications 5

It’s All About the Experience! 9

How Is TelePresence Different Than Video Conferencing? 11

Quality 12

Simplicity 13

Reliability 13

Bandwidth Requirements 14

Chapter 2 Cisco TelePresence Solution Overview 17

The Cisco TelePresence Solution 17

Cisco TelePresence Codec 18

Industry-Leading Audio and Video 20

Video Resolution and Compression Formats 21

Audio Resolution and Compression Formats 23

Collaboration Tools 24

Audio and Video Multiplexing 25

Cisco 7975 Series IP Phone 25

Cisco TelePresence System 3000 26

Three Native 1080p High-Definition Cameras 27

Three 65-Inch High-Definition Plasma Displays 27

Purpose-Built Meeting Table, Integrated Projector, and Lighting Shroud 28

Multichannel Wide-Band Audio 29

Cisco TelePresence System 3200 29

Extended Camera Focal View 30

Second Row Seating 30

Extension of Each Table Segment 31

Optional Displays for Shared Content 31

Cisco TelePresence System 1000 32

One Native 1080p High-Definition Camera 33

One 65-Inch High-Definition Plasma Display 33

Integrated Lighting Shroud 33

One Wide-band Microphone and Speaker 34

Cisco TelePresence System 500 34

One Native 1080p High-Definition Camera 34

One 37-Inch High-Definition LCD Display 34

Integrated Lighting Shroud 36

Integrated Wideband Microphone and Speaker 36

Multiple Configuration Options 36

Cisco Unified Communications Manager 36

Cisco TelePresence Manager 38

Calendaring Integration and Management 38

One-Button-to-Push Meeting Access 38

Resource and Location Management for Cisco TelePresence Multipoint Switch 39

CTS System Management and Reporting 41

Concierge Services 41

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint Switch 42

Cisco TelePresence Inter-Company 43

Operation, Administration, and Monitoring 45

Related TelePresence Services 47

Cisco TelePresence Planning, Design, and Implementation 47

Cisco TelePresence Essential Operate Service 49

Cisco TelePresence Select Operate and TelePresence Remote Assistance Service 49

Part II: Telepresence Technologies 53

Chapter 3 TelePresence Audio and Video Technologies 55

Codec Design Requirements 55

Codec System Architecture 56

Codec Physical Design 56

Master and Slave Codec Architecture 56

Codec Operating System Software 59

Encoding and Packetization 61

Camera and Auxiliary Video Inputs 62

Video Encoding 63

Audio Encoding 68

Real-Time Transport Protocol 70

TelePresence Packet Rates 73

Depacketization and Decoding 77

Managing Latency, Jitter, and Loss 77

Summary of Latency, Jitter, Loss Targets and Thresholds,
and Actions 82

Demultiplexing and Decoding 83

Audio-Only Participants 87

Dual-Tone Multi-Frequency 89

RFC 2833 90

Key-Pad Markup Language 90

Other Protocols 90

How DTMF Tones Are Processed in Cisco TelePresence 91

Interoperability with Out-of-Band Collaboration Applications 92

Interoperability with Video Conferencing 92

Interoperability RTP Channels 93

Chapter 4 Connecting TelePresence Systems 99

Internal TelePresence System Connections 99

Connecting a CTS-500 System 99

Connecting a CTS-1000 System 100

Connecting a CTS-3000 System 101

Connecting a CTS-3200 System 104

TelePresence Network Interaction 106

TelePresence Network Deployment Models 111

Intracampus Deployment Model 112

Intra-Enterprise Deployment Model 112

Intercompany Deployment Model 114

TelePresence Phases of Deployment 116

Chapter 5 Network Availability Technologies 121

Network Availability 121

Device Availability Technologies 125

Stackwise/Stackwise Plus 126

Nonstop Forwarding with Stateful Switchover 128

Network Availability Protocols 132

L2 Network Availability Protocols 132

L3 Network Availability Protocols 147

Operational Availabilities Technologies 155

Generic Online Diagnostics 156

Chapter 6 Network Quality of Service Technologies 161

Modular QoS Command-Line Interface 161

Classification Tools 162

Class Maps 162

Network Based Application Recognition 163

Marking Tools 165

Ethernet 802.1Q/p CoS 165

MPLS EXP 166

Differentiated Services Code Points 167

Policing Tools 172

Single-Rate Policers 173

Dual-Rate Policers 174

Shaping Tools 178

Queuing Tools 181

CBWFQ 181

LLQ 183

Hardware Queuing: 1PxQyT 187

Dropping Tools 190

WRED 192

DSCP-Based WRED 193

Explicit Congestion Notification 194

HQoS 196

Chapter 7 TelePresence Control and Security Protocols 203

Network Control Protocols 203

IEEE 802.1p/Q: VLAN Tagging and CoS 203

IEEE 802.1p/Q Utilization Within Cisco TelePresence Networks 205

IEEE 802.3af: Power over Ethernet 205

Network Time Protocol (NTP) 206

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) 207

Signaling Protocols 208

Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) 208

AXL/SOAP 216

JTAPI, TAPI, and CTIQBE 216

WebDAV 217

LDAP 217

Network Management Protocols 217

Cisco Discovery Protocol 218

Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) 222

Simple Network Management Protocol 223

TelePresence Security Protocols 226

Transport Layer Security (TLS) 226

Secure Real-Time Transport Protocol (sRTP) 228

Bandwidth Impact of Enabling TelePresence Encryption 232

Secure Shell (SSH) 232

Secure Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTPS) 233

Part III: Telepresence System Design 237

Chapter 8 TelePresence Room Design 239

Room Dimensions, Shape, and Orientation 239

Width Requirements 240

Depth Requirements 245

Height Requirements 249

Angles, Shape, and Orientation 253

Doors and Windows 258

Wall, Floor, and Ceiling Surfaces 259

Wall Surfaces 259

Flooring Surfaces 262

Ceiling Surfaces 263

Lighting and Illumination 265

Considering Light Angles and Direction 266

Considering Light Color Temperature 266

Measuring Light Intensity 269

Light Fixture and Bulb Considerations 271

Light Fixture Ballast Considerations 275

Acoustics 276

Measuring Ambient Noise 277

Measuring Reverberation 279

Targeted and Maximum Ambient Noise and Reverberation Levels 281

Controlling Ambient Noise and Reverberation Levels 281

Scenarios for Mitigating Ambient Noise and Reverberation 283

HVAC 283

HVAC Air Noise Diffusion Considerations 289

Power Requirements 290

Network Connectivity 294

Chapter 9 TelePresence Network Design Part 1: Availability Design 297

TelePresence Availability Considerations and Targets 297

Highly Available Campus Design for TelePresence 299

Redundancy 300

Hierarchy 301

Modularity 303

Multitier Campus Distribution Block Design 304

Virtual Switch Campus Distribution Block Design 307

Routed Access Campus Distribution Block Design 311

Highly Available Branch Designs for TelePresence 330

Dual-Tier Branch Profiles 331

Multitier Branch Profiles 333

Chapter 10 TelePresence Network Design Part 2: Quality of Service Design 339

TelePresence QoS Considerations 339

TelePresence Service Level Requirements 339

TelePresence DiffServ Strategy 349

Campus QoS Design for TelePresence 356

Catalyst 3560/3750 QoS Design for TelePresence 359

Catalyst 4500/4900 QoS Design for TelePresence 366

Catalyst 6500 QoS Design for TelePresence 374

Branch QoS Designs for TelePresence 381

LLQ Versus CBWFQ over the WAN/VPN? 383

Branch MPLS VPN QoS Considerations and Design 392

Chapter 11 TelePresence Firewall Design 407

Cisco Firewall Platforms 407

Firewall Deployment Options 409

Transparent Versus Routed Mode 409

Equal Versus Unequal Interface Security Levels 410

Network Address Translation 411

Application Layer Protocol Inspection 413

TLS Proxy Functionality 413

TelePresence Protocol Requirements 413

Device Provisioning Flows 414

Configuration Download and Device Registration Protocols 416

Call Scheduling and Services Flows 419

Call Signaling Flows 421

Media Flows 421

Management Flows 424

Example Firewall Configuration 428

Chapter 12 TelePresence Call-Signaling Design 435

Overview of TelePresence Call-Signaling Components 435

CUCM: SIP Registrar and Back-to-Back User Agent 435

CTS Endpoints: SIP User Agents 437

CTMS: SIP Trunk 437

Cisco TelePresence SBC and CUBE: B2BUA and Media Proxy 437

Session Description Protocol 438

Bandwidth Negotiation 440

Media Negotiation 440

Other Negotiated Parameters 441

CTS Boot Process 441

Single-Cluster Call Signaling Examples 443

CTS Endpoint Registration 443

Call Setup 445

Call Termination 448

Call Hold 449

Intercluster Call Signaling 450

Single Enterprise Signaling 450

Business-to-Business Signaling 450

Chapter 13 Multipoint TelePresence Design 455

CTMS Overview 455

CTMS Meeting Types 457

CTMS Meeting Features 459

Multipoint Resources 462

Geographical Resource Management 463

Quality of Service 463

Meeting Security 464

Meeting Management 465

Audio and Video Flows in a Multipoint TelePresence Design 466

Audio in a Multipoint TelePresence Meeting 466

Video in a Multipoint TelePresence Meeting 467

TelePresence Interoperability 469

Network Design Considerations for Multipoint TelePresence 472

Deployment Models 472

Additional Latency 473

Bandwidth Considerations 475

Burst Considerations 477

Positioning of the CTMS Within the Network 481

Placement Within the Campus 481

Placement within the Branch 482

LAN Switch Platform Considerations 482

WAN Circuit Support 483

Basic Configuration Requirements for Multipoint TelePresence 484

CUCM Configuration Requirements 484

CTMS Configuration Requirements 484

Chapter 14 Inter-Company TelePresence Design 487

End-to-End Application Requirements 488

Experience Quality Requirements 488

Ease of Use Requirements 489

Reliability Requirements 489

Security Requirements 489

Nonproprietary Requirements 490

Scalability Requirements 490

Solution Components 490

Network Architecture and Security 492

Public E.164 Dialing 494

Inter-VPN Connectivity 495

End-to-End Application-Layer Security 510

Inter-Company Deployment Models 517

Converged Versus Overlay Access Circuits 518

Centralized Inter-Company Access Circuit 518

Multiple, Decentralized Inter-Company Access Circuits 523

Inter-Company Dialing Models 528

Scheduling Inter-Company Meetings 531

Multiple Service Provider Peering 533

Appendix Protocols Used in Cisco TelePresence Solutions 539

TOC, 9781587055935, 5-4-09

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  • Posted August 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Great Introduction to Cisco TelePresence

    As a Consulting Systems Engineer for a Cisco Gold Partner, I need to educated myself on the basics of design, architecture, and deployment of Cisco TelePresence. "Cisco TelePresence Fundamentals" by Cisco Press provided me what that information.

    "Cisco TelePresence Fundamentals" follows the same successful formula as many of the other Cisco Press Fundamentals series. The first few chapters provide a cursory overview of the solution, including historical background and product portfolio information. The second section of the book delves into the core technological components of the Cisco TelePresence solution. For the experience Voice/UC or Route/Switch engineer, much of this content will be a refresher, such as QoS and Call Control. For a new individual first being exposed to these technologies, the chapters provide excellent coverage. The final section of the text delves down on the specific Cisco TelePresence design concepts, including the importance of room layout and design, detailed network design and configuration requirements, multipoint design, and multi-company telepresence design principles and best practices.

    A great book for a Cisco partner SE to have, as well as any end-user interested in exploring the Cisco TelePresence solution.

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  • Posted June 15, 2009

    VERY VERY HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!

    Are you part of a technical staff tasked with deploying Cisco TelePresence systems? If you are, then this book is for you! Authors Tim Szigeti, Kevin McMenamy, Roland Saville, and Alan Glowacki, have done an outstanding job of writing a book that introduces you to Cisco TelePresence technologies.


    Authors Szigeti, McMenamy, Saville and Glowacki, begin by introducing you to Cisco, TelePresence, by tracing the evolution of video communications from the 1964 World's Fair to 2006. Then, the authors show you the various components that comprise Cisco TelePresence systems and solutions. The authors also show you in more detail how the Cisco TelePresence codec interacts with the high-definition displays and cameras, microphones and speakers, the IP Phones, auxiliary components, and, most importantly, the network. They continue by detailing how individual components interconnect and interrelate within Cisco TelePresence systems. Then, the authors present a foundational context for the best practice designs, by introducing concepts and metrics relating to network availability for TelePresence deployments. Next, they lay a base for the validated designs, by introducing concepts and metrics relating to network quality of service for TelePresence deployments. The authors also provide some background for the designs by introducing concepts and technologies relating to signaling, control, and security design for TelePresence deployments. The continue by describing topics that are rarely covered in Cisco Press books and that many networking professionals might be unfamiliar with, but nonetheless are critical to properly designing rooms to support TelePresence. Then, the authors detail network considerations, targets, and design recommendations for highly available TelePresence networks. Next, the authors detail network considerations, targets, and design recommendations for QoS enabled TelePresence networks. They also outline firewall design options for TelePresence deployments. Then, the authors examine TelePresence call-signaling components. Next, the authors expand the complexity of the TelePresence deployments by introducing the Cisco TelePresence Multipoint Switch, which enables up to 48 TelePresence segments to be joined together in a single conference. Finally, the authors introduce a solution that enables one business to place TelePresence calls to another, namely the Cisco TelePresence Inter-Company Solution.


    This most excellent book is organized in such a way that it can be read from cover-to-cover. Perhaps more importantly, this great book can be used as a quick reference guide to specific technical information and design recommendations.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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