Citizenship

Overview

Concepts of citizenship have been central to political discourse in the West throughout history — but the notion of what it means to be a citizen has been radically modified over the centuries, to suit a variety of political expedients. There is now renewed interest in citizenship as a fundamental principle in Western democracy; but what do we mean when we talk of citizens and their rights?

Citizenship offers more than fifty carefully chosen extracts from the key political ...

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Overview

Concepts of citizenship have been central to political discourse in the West throughout history — but the notion of what it means to be a citizen has been radically modified over the centuries, to suit a variety of political expedients. There is now renewed interest in citizenship as a fundamental principle in Western democracy; but what do we mean when we talk of citizens and their rights?

Citizenship offers more than fifty carefully chosen extracts from the key political debates surrounding citizenship, from Aristotle and Plutarch in Ancient Greece to Raymond Plant and the Maastricht Treaty in the present day, in an invaluable sourcebook of writings on the subject. The selection highlights the variety of ways in which philosophers, activists and theorists have applied the idea of citizenship to particular circumstances and to serve particular ends.

In a substantial introduction, Paul Barry Clarke sets the historical and political context and traces the evolution of the idea of citizenship, providing a springboard for further debate and new thinking on a subject that concerns us all.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780745305868
  • Publisher: Pluto Press
  • Publication date: 12/28/1993
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 1,035,079
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Table of Contents

Pt. I Citizen Human
Before Politics 4
Political Beginnings 5
Privilege and Exclusivity 6
Two Types of Citizen 7
Inward Turn 9
Withdrawal and Return 11
Revolution and Beyond 13
The Reconstitution of the City as Symbol 20
Citizenship as a Project 27
Pt. II The Beginnings of Citizenship
1 The First Citizen 37
2 I Made the Crooked Straight 38
3 On Solon 39
4 The Funeral Oration 41
5 What is a City? 43
6 Against Timocrates 46
7 The Duty of a Ruler towards the Citizens 48
8 Remember This Day 50
9 The World is our City 52
10 A Citizen of Rome 54
11 A New Covenant 55
12 The City is Superior to the Citizen 56
13 Harm to the Citizen is Harm to the State 56
Pt. III The Christian Citizen
1 Epistle to Diognetus 61
2 The Two Cities 62
3 Human Law May Be Perverted 64
4 Private Gain, Public Harm 65
Pt. IV The Italian Revival
1 A Monarch is the Servant of All 69
2 Only Citizens May Make Laws 70
3 To Know the City 73
4 In Praise of the City of Florence 74
5 Funeral Oration 77
Pt. V Citizenship in the Emerging State
1 Tyranny is Contrary to Nature and Reason 83
2 Concerning the Citizen 86
3 Citizen and Subject 89
4 On the Duties of Citizens 91
5 When Virtue is Absent Avarice is Present 93
6 To Form Citizens is Not the Work of a Day 96
7 Citizens are Subject Only to Themselves 101
8 Active and Passive Citizens 103
Pt. VI A New World Order
1 From the Declaration of Independence, 1776 111
2 From the Constitution of the United States of America, 1787 114
3 From the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of Citizens, 1789 115
4 And Why Should Citizens Not Aspire to Public Offices? 117
5 Against the Poll Tax 118
6 The Restraints on Men are among Their Rights 121
7 Obedience is to Laws Not Men 123
8 Citizens Have a Duty to Keep a Watchful Eye on Government 125
9 A Republic Can Control Factions 126
10 A Republic is Founded on Property 129
11 Friends and Fellow Citizens 131
12 We are All Republicans 134
13 Human Emancipation 137
14 Some Are More Equal Than Others 140
Pt. VII Citizen and State
1 To Live Without Duties is Obscene 147
2 Time and Duties 149
3 A Government of People 152
4 A Good American Citizen 153
5 The Purpose of the State is to Serve the Citizens 157
6 First and Second Class Citizens 159
7 Becoming a Citizen 162
8 The State is Nothing but its Citizens 164
9 Critical Times 168
10 The Typical Citizen is a Primitive 170
11 Class and Citizenship 173
12 What is a Good Citizen? 177
13 Citizen or Person? 180
14 Citizenship and Capitalism 183
15 Democratic Citizenship 185
16 A Citizen of the European Union 188
Index
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