City by Numbers

Overview

In the ideal follow-up to his stunning Caldecott Honor book Alphabet City, Stephen T. Johnson turns his talents towards numbers. Wordless spreads featuring impressively photo-realistic paintings of New York City invite readers both young and old to search for the numbers zero through twenty-one hidden in the images. From a sweeping 4 found in the span of an urban bridge to the 13 of a faded crosswalk, this is an intriguing new way to think about numbers and the world around you....

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$6.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $2.06   
  • New (6) from $4.43   
  • Used (8) from $2.06   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

In the ideal follow-up to his stunning Caldecott Honor book Alphabet City, Stephen T. Johnson turns his talents towards numbers. Wordless spreads featuring impressively photo-realistic paintings of New York City invite readers both young and old to search for the numbers zero through twenty-one hidden in the images. From a sweeping 4 found in the span of an urban bridge to the 13 of a faded crosswalk, this is an intriguing new way to think about numbers and the world around you.

Paintings of various sites around New York City--from a shadow on a building to a wrought iron-gate to the Brooklyn Bridge--depict the numbers from one to twenty-one.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Horn Magazine
The publisher informs us that City by Numbers is being reprinted for color correction and the publication date has been postponed. Two new number books place the emphasis on the shape of the numeral rather than the more usual concept of "how many." Stephen Johnson, whose brilliantly conceived paintings in Alphabet City showed each letter within a photo-realistic cityscape, has created a number book in the same vein. Unfortunately, most of City by Numbers is disappointingly arcane and eventually tedious as he takes the numbers all the way up to twenty-one. Johnson's palette tends toward the monochromatic, mainly in the gray and brown range, with a few notable exceptions. Number 4 is a glorious spread showing a suspension bridge at sunrise, the horizontal and vertical formed by the road bed and the tower, with long cables sweeping across the pages to connect the two. This is the sort of uplifting image that transfigured Alphabet City: simultaneously realistic and optimistic, urging the reader to examine afresh the shapes of everyday objects. But there is no such momentum in City by Numbers. The reader is frequently stopped short by arrangements that stretch credulity (paint conveniently peeling in the shape of a 2; a maple tree 16 showing a straight branch for the 1 and an awkwardly bent branch for the 6) or that take tremendous effort to figure out without sufficient reward (more "oh" than "a-ha!"). Johnson's painstakingly executed paintings are admirable, but the subject-matter is simply too narrow for this sequel. In contrast, Arlene Alda's 1 2 3 covers less territory with fewer restrictions. Lush, colorful photographs of everyday objects show 1 through 10 and back again. As she did in Arlene Alda's ABC, the photographer has kept the images and the format simple and accessible. The elegant design places all the numbers on each page, with the relevant number shown much larger and in a different color. All the objects will be easily recognized by children aged three or four: a tape dispenser for 6, a bendable straw for 7, the handle of a child's scissors for 9. Children should be able to find most of the hidden numerals, too, once they catch on to the idea, though a few pages may require help from an adult-one of the most clever images is that of a kite string forming the number 2, with an added bonus of another 2 sketched by the clouds behind it. Author's notes in the back clarify the images for those who are in doubt and provide bits of personal information. -Lolly Robinson
Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
In his newest creation Johnson does for numbers what he did for letters in Alphabet City. In and around New York City, Johnson explores angles, circles, squares, and intersecting lines from unusual perspectives. The number five emerges form the shadow of branches on a brick wall, trash baskets clearly reveal the number eight, and two tall smoke stacks are easily recognizable as the number eleven. In each of the stunning illustrations, visual acuity is the key. Some of the numbers are not readily discernible but the imaginative observer who looks for the unusual will be rewarded. Insightful, playful, poetic, this picture book will delight older children and art students of all ages.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 5--In this companion volume to Alphabet City (Viking, 1995), Johnson's photo-realistic paintings show the numbers from 1 to 21 in city details. Since these are paintings, the artist is able to tweak the scenes a bit; the number two is made by flakes of peeling paint, for example. Sometimes the numerals are hard to discern, as in the case of the 10, made of wavery reflections in a glass building, or the 21, created from lighted windows in a skyscraper. Tana Hoban's Count and See (Macmillan, 1972) has black-and-white photos of city scenes, but shows numbers of objects rather than numerals, as here. Bruce McMillan's Fire Engine Shapes (Lothrop, 1988; o.p.) provides shapes rather than numerals to discover, but uses color photographs of a subject with proven child appeal, as well as including children in his illustrations. Johnson's images are fascinating and make this book interesting to older children.--Pam Gosner, formerly at Maplewood Memorial Library, NJ
Kirkus Reviews
In this wordless companion to Alphabet City (1995), Johnson joins the likes of Tana Hoban, Arlene Alda, and Donald Crews in his attraction to the numbers, letters, shapes, and compositions found in the architecture and infrastructures of outdoor places and public spaces.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140566369
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/28/2003
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 241,791
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.39 (w) x 9.74 (h) x 0.08 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)