City Colors

Overview

Color has the power to inspire and delight. The playful photographs here invite youngsters on an international urban journey with color as their guide -- from London's famous red double-deckers to New York City's shiny black limousines to Rio de Janeiro's multicolored playgrounds. The ten colors featured are each clearly presented in a main photograph and in a smaller focus image.
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Overview

Color has the power to inspire and delight. The playful photographs here invite youngsters on an international urban journey with color as their guide -- from London's famous red double-deckers to New York City's shiny black limousines to Rio de Janeiro's multicolored playgrounds. The ten colors featured are each clearly presented in a main photograph and in a smaller focus image.
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Editorial Reviews

Globe & Mail
Photojournalist Zoral Milich’s previous books for children, The City ABC Book, and City Signs, were masterful, intriguing demonstrations of elementary concepts executed in a minimalist way, and in a way that never undercuts the graphic elegance of the page. These are sophisticated books that give small folk a taste of something quite fine. In his newest book, City Colors, Milich moves from ABC’s to red, white, and blue, and beyond. Milich’s modus operandi is to use a double-page spread to “illustrate” a colour. Take the colour red, for instance; One the left-hand page, a small square frames a photograph of a part of something red. The right-hand page shows the whole thing - or enough of it to determine that what we’ve got is a red double-decker bus speeding down the tarmac. Black - not a colour for some - is presented as a photograph of a square of blackness interrupted by an interesting piece of shiny chrome. A black stretch limonsine slithers across the black asphalt street on the right-hand page. Lots of aha! Moments here dressed up in pink, purple, and yellow, too.
National Post
Good picture books capture children and adults alike, neither too complicated to confuse a child trying to negotiate meaning nor to simple to turn off a parent from the requisite repeat reading. City Colors by Toronto photojournalist Zoran Milich does just that, with his striking images of London’s red double-decker buses and Rio’s multi-coloured playgrounds simultaneously providing parents with fodder for their great urban reveries while perfectly conveying to children the meaning of these bold colours. Both generations leave these children’s books richer for the experience of it.
Horn Book
Boldly designed and photographed ? [a satisfying mix of recognizable scenes and mysterious close-ups.
From the Publisher
Milich complements his powerful The City ABC Book and City Signs with a dazzling new concept book.

Milich complements his powerful The City ABC Book and City Signs with a dazzling new concept book.

Photojournalist Zoral Milich’s previous books for children, The City ABC Book, and City Signs, were masterful, intriguing demonstrations of elementary concepts executed in a minimalist way, and in a way that never undercuts the graphic elegance of the page. These are sophisticated books that give small folk a taste of something quite fine. In his newest book, City Colors, Milich moves from ABC’s to red, white, and blue, and beyond. Milich’s modus operandi is to use a double-page spread to “illustrate” a colour. Take the colour red, for instance; One the left-hand page, a small square frames a photograph of a part of something red. The right-hand page shows the whole thing - or enough of it to determine that what we’ve got is a red double-decker bus speeding down the tarmac. Black - not a colour for some - is presented as a photograph of a square of blackness interrupted by an interesting piece of shiny chrome. A black stretch limonsine slithers across the black asphalt street on the right-hand page. Lots of aha! Moments here dressed up in pink, purple, and yellow, too.

Photojournalist Zoral Milich’s previous books for children, The City ABC Book, and City Signs, were masterful, intriguing demonstrations of elementary concepts executed in a minimalist way, and in a way that never undercuts the graphic elegance of the page. These are sophisticated books that give small folk a taste of something quite fine. In his newest book, City Colors, Milich moves from ABC’s to red, white, and blue, and beyond. Milich’s modus operandi is to use a double-page spread to “illustrate” a colour. Take the colour red, for instance; One the left-hand page, a small square frames a photograph of a part of something red. The right-hand page shows the whole thing - or enough of it to determine that what we’ve got is a red double-decker bus speeding down the tarmac. Black - not a colour for some - is presented as a photograph of a square of blackness interrupted by an interesting piece of shiny chrome. A black stretch limonsine slithers across the black asphalt street on the right-hand page. Lots of aha! Moments here dressed up in pink, purple, and yellow, too.

Good picture books capture children and adults alike, neither too complicated to confuse a child trying to negotiate meaning nor to simple to turn off a parent from the requisite repeat reading. City Colors by Toronto photojournalist Zoran Milich does just that, with his striking images of London’s red double-decker buses and Rio’s multi-coloured playgrounds simultaneously providing parents with fodder for their great urban reveries while perfectly conveying to children the meaning of these bold colours. Both generations leave these children’s books richer for the experience of it.

Good picture books capture children and adults alike, neither too complicated to confuse a child trying to negotiate meaning nor to simple to turn off a parent from the requisite repeat reading. City Colors by Toronto photojournalist Zoran Milich does just that, with his striking images of London’s red double-decker buses and Rio’s multi-coloured playgrounds simultaneously providing parents with fodder for their great urban reveries while perfectly conveying to children the meaning of these bold colours. Both generations leave these children’s books richer for the experience of it.

Boldly designed and photographed ? [a] satisfying mix of recognizable scenes and mysterious close-ups.

Boldly designed and photographed ? [a] satisfying mix of recognizable scenes and mysterious close-ups.

Children's Literature
Clean city colors and a variety of settings characterize this color identification book. Photographs of a red London bus, a painter wearing blue clothes and painting a blue wall, a greenish-yellow traffic cone standing out from yellow cabs, a green swing seat, and orange poles that frame a fire hydrant and reveal an orange truck passing by all offer something for a child to relate to or talk about. Unlike the photograph books of Ann Morris which include more about the location in the book's ending pages, these photos could be taken almost anywhere and only one includes a child. There are many books available for young children that present a chance to talk about and identify colors and this one can join the pile, but it is outshone by books such as Tana Hoban's Colors Everywhere or Of Colors and Things or photo essays by Ann Morris or Margaret Miller. 2004, Kids Can Press, Ages 2 to 5.
—Susan Hepler, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Milich complements his powerful The City ABC Book (2001) and City Signs (2002, both Kids Can) with a dazzling new concept book. Beginning with a red London bus, a blue warehouse wall, and a yellow highway cone, his photos create a well-planned city landscape. Precise partial photos inspire speculation on each verso with the recto revealing the complete image. The secondary colors follow: a green swing, an orange cylindrical curb block, and a purple playground stool. Black and white are next, followed by a pink playground conduit and a gray I beam. A purely visual book, the text is simply the representative color for each photo. In summation, squares of all 10 colors appear above the words "Many colors!" and face a picture of a garage door painted in different hues.-Karen Land, Greenport Public School, NY Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Photographer Milich follows up City ABC Book (2001) and City Signs (2002) with another set of generic urban scenes, each placed opposite a close-up detail, and captioned with a single, large-type color word. Though the photos were taken in several countries (never identified), visible signs are in English, and even children without much big-city experience will have no trouble identifying either the subjects-which range from a hydrant and a bus stop, to a thickly painted safety railing and, at the end, a multicolored garage door-or their bright primary colors. Despite one bobble-a car door handle that is clear in the detail, but blurred beyond easy recognition in the larger picture, as the black limo is racing by-Milich surveys Tana Hoban territory here with a fresh eye, and the same ability to draw simple forms from the city's visual jumble. (Picture book. 2-4)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781553375425
  • Publisher: Kids Can Press, Limited
  • Publication date: 3/1/2004
  • Edition description: Lap-sized Board Book
  • Pages: 24
  • Sales rank: 1,176,771
  • Age range: 2 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.95 (d)

Meet the Author

Zoran Milich is an award-winning photojournalist. He lives in Toronto, Ontario.
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