City Government in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor

Overview

City Government in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor examines the social and administrative transformation of Greek society within the early Roman empire, assessing the extent to which the numerous changes in Greek cities during the imperial period ought to be attributed to Roman influence. The topic is crucial to our understanding of the foundations of Roman imperial power because Greek speakers comprised the empire's second largest population group and played a vital role in ...

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Overview

City Government in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor examines the social and administrative transformation of Greek society within the early Roman empire, assessing the extent to which the numerous changes in Greek cities during the imperial period ought to be attributed to Roman influence. The topic is crucial to our understanding of the foundations of Roman imperial power because Greek speakers comprised the empire's second largest population group and played a vital role in its administration, culture, and social life.

This book elucidates the transformation of Greek society in this period from a local point of view, mostly through the study of local sources such as inscriptions and coins. By providing information on public activities, education, family connections, and individual careers, it shows the extent of and geographical variation in Greek provincial reaction to the changes accompanying the establishment of Roman rule. In general, new local administrative and social developments during the period were most heavily influenced by traditional pre-Roman practices, while innovations were few and of limited importance.

Concentrating on the province of Asia, one of the most urbanized Greek-speaking provinces of Rome, this work demonstrates that Greek local administration remained diverse under the Romans, while at the same time local Greek nobility gradually merged with the Roman ruling class into one imperial elite. This conclusion interprets the interference of Roman authorities in local administration as a form of interaction between different segments of the imperial elite, rejecting the old explanation of such interference as a display of Roman control over subjects.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195170429
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 12/10/2004
  • Pages: 448
  • Product dimensions: 9.30 (w) x 6.30 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Sviatoslav Dmitriev is Assistant Professor of Ancient History at Ball State University.

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Table of Contents

1 Language and responsibilities 13
2 Officials and municipal functions 34
3 Individual cities : Miletus, Priene, Samos 64
4 The language of responsibilities 109
5 The status of city officials 140
6 Rome and new municipal functions 189
7 The evolution of municipal functions 217
8 The metropoleis : Smyrna and Ephesus 247
9 Greek cities under Hellenistic and Roman rulers 289
App Observations on the coinage of Hellenistic Priene 337
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