City of One: Young Writers Speak to the World

City of One: Young Writers Speak to the World

by WritersCorps
     
 

Poetry, Fiction, Cultural Writing. Ethnic Studies. In this new collection from WritersCorps, young urban poets and authors make the act of writing into an act of peace. The exploration ranges from the personal to the communal to the political. Funded by a Peace and the Written Word Award from the Isabel Allende Foundation, with a forward by Allende herself, CITY

Overview


Poetry, Fiction, Cultural Writing. Ethnic Studies. In this new collection from WritersCorps, young urban poets and authors make the act of writing into an act of peace. The exploration ranges from the personal to the communal to the political. Funded by a Peace and the Written Word Award from the Isabel Allende Foundation, with a forward by Allende herself, CITY OF ONE is a testimony to a new engaged generation.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
For years, WritersCorps has been dedicated to providing quality books of poetry with voices of youth at the center. The tradition continues here with more than two hundred poems written by youth from age seven to twenty-three. The poems are divided into six sections-In the Worry of the World; Under Fire; Our Words Are Universal; My People; Hope Waits, Like Us; and Ours Poetica-with a quote from one of the poems to introduce each section. The foreword by Isabel Allende warns that the poets speak volumes about social conditions in our society. The structure of each poem varies, from haiku to free verse and other poetry forms. The mood changes from section to section. For example, a number of the poems from the In the Worry of the World section are filled with despair and melancholy. But the majority of the poems in Our Words Are Universal appear reflective yet celebratory. Other sections include poems about ambitions, holidays, culture, ancestors, and more. The final section offers vivid metaphors for poetry and an overall appreciation and respect for the written word. One poet writes, "Poetry is the story of the soul / vivid pictures / that pulse through our minds," whereas another writer suggests, "A poem is Native Americans dancing." Despite the many topics covered, peace and social action are at the core of each section. The topics and themes will resonate with most young adults. This book would be a great addition to public, school, and classroom libraries. VOYA CODES: 3Q 4P M J S (Readable without serious defects; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2004, Aunt LuteBooks/WritersCorps Books/San Francisco, 240p., Trade pb. Ages 11 to 18.
—KaaVonia Hinton-Johnson
KLIATT
This anthology of poems by WritersCorps students affords the reader an intimate glimpse into the minds of young people faced with poverty and hardship on a day-to-day basis. The young voices found in these poems confront everything from experiences with drugs and violence to the nature of love and the difficult task of claiming an identity in a time of turmoil on both a personal and global level. These young writers of all ages and ethnicities are direct and often brutally honest in their poems—"I need to write about / all the hatred in this world, / all the racist people, / all the wars, the fights, the arguments," writes 15-year-old Zelkja Lazic in the poem "What I've Seen." This is an anthology that young readers will be able to identify with not only for its accessible language but for its diverse portrayal of what it is to be young and dealing with the world today. Most importantly, it offers a fresh and ultimately hopeful outlook on life even in the midst of pain. As 18-year-old Raudel Ruiz May writes, "Hope sounds like the sea / waiting for emotions of waves / which will break on the rocks / making a sound like a splash." KLIATT Codes: JS—Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2004, Aunt Lute, 239p., Ages 12 to 18.
—Beth Lizardo
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-This anthology celebrates the 10th anniversary of WritersCorps workshops, which bring creative-writing instruction to low-income kids from public schools, youth detention centers, halfway houses, and after-school programs. More than 150 young people ranging in age from 9 to 23 write about their lives and the state of the world. There are angry poems as in "Dear Mr. Bush": "-Dear Mr. Bush why can you go to war and not go/To prison yet we get 25 to life for killing each other/On the streets?" Desperate poems also appear, as in "Home": "My home is filled wit crack rocks and dope spots./My home is constantly invaded/by crooked cops whose purpose is to send my/people to jail instead of helpin' them." Reflective poems include "Deep Inside": "The best place I ever was is in my mind/-It's a place of peace and tranquility/where I take time to grow." Poems about family, freedom, inner peace, self-identity, and the writing process round out this remarkable anthology. Above all, these poems are about adolescence; the seething emotions as well as the incredible hope for the future are present.-Sonja Cole, Briarcliff Middle School, Mountain Lakes, NJ Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781879960695
Publisher:
Aunt Lute Books
Publication date:
05/01/2004
Pages:
244
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author


WritersCorps, San Francisco, places professional writers in community settings to teach creative writing to youth. The program is part of a national alliance with sites in the Bronx and Washington, D.C., whose shared vision is to strengthen and transform individuals and communities using the written word.

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