Civil Examinations and Meritocracy in Late Imperial China

Civil Examinations and Meritocracy in Late Imperial China

by Benjamin A. Elman
     
 

Benjamin Elman describes how education, examinations, and civil service fostered the world's first professional class based on demonstrated knowledge. Chinese civil examinations, a piece of social engineering worked out over centuries, prefigured the regime of meritocratic exams that undergirds higher education around the globe today.See more details below

Overview

Benjamin Elman describes how education, examinations, and civil service fostered the world's first professional class based on demonstrated knowledge. Chinese civil examinations, a piece of social engineering worked out over centuries, prefigured the regime of meritocratic exams that undergirds higher education around the globe today.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674724952
Publisher:
Harvard
Publication date:
11/01/2013
Pages:
416
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.60(h) x 1.30(d)

Table of Contents

Conventions ix

Introduction 1

Part I Becoming Mainstream: "Way Learning" during the Late Empire

1 Ming Imperial Power, Cultural Politics, and Civil Examinations 13

2 Ming to Qing: "Way Learning" Standards and the 8-Legged Essay 46

Part II Unintended Consequences of Civil Examinations

3 Circulation of Ming-Qing Elites 95

4 Classical Literacy in Late Imperial China 126

5 Anxiety, Dreams, and the Examination Life 147

Part III Retooling Civil Examinations to Suit Changing Times

6 Limits of Dynastic Power 213

7 From Ming to Qing Policy Questions 250

8 Curricular Reform: From Qing to the Taipings 280

Appendixes

1 Dates of Chinese Dynasties 323

2 Emperors of the Great Ming (1368-1644) 325

3 Emperors of the Great Qing (1644-1911) 327

Abbreviations 329

Notes 333

Acknowledgments 387

Index 391

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