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The Civil War 100
     

The Civil War 100

by Michael Lanning
 

The Civil War was the defining event in American history.
The Civil War 100 uses a truly novel approach to analyze the respective importance of the events, leaders and battles of America's most important war.

"Across this easily accessible reference, readers meet not only such icons as Lincoln and Lee, but also chronic fumblers whose tarnished reputations have

Overview

The Civil War was the defining event in American history.
The Civil War 100 uses a truly novel approach to analyze the respective importance of the events, leaders and battles of America's most important war.

"Across this easily accessible reference, readers meet not only such icons as Lincoln and Lee, but also chronic fumblers whose tarnished reputations have most often sunk beneath the notice of the endless waves of Civil War histories...A
recommended reference for the aficionado and the uninitiated alike. Those well-versed in Civil War lore will enjoy the intellectual challenge of supporting or debunking Lanning's rankings, while the merely curious will be exposed to an insightful world of detail that they may have otherwise missed." -ForeWord Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402210402
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Publication date:
02/01/2008
Pages:
382
Sales rank:
1,221,737
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.10(d)

Read an Excerpt

Antietam

which they operated or originated. Again, the North and South differed on how to name their armies and followed the general procedures they used to name battles. The Federals designated their armies for rivers while the Confederate armies took their names from the region of their assignment. Thus, the Union Army of the Potomac opposed the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. This becomes even more confusing when the Union organization was the Army of the Tennessee as opposed to the Confederate-named Army of Tennessee.

Officer Ranks: Officers of both sides often had two ranks-one awarded by their state militia and another by the regular army. Even more confusion arises from the practice of both sides to award "brevet" promotions. These ranks, awarded for gallantry or meritorious action, were strictly honorary and had none of the authority or pay of the actual rank. Regular ranks are the ones most used in this work. Both armies followed the traditional ranks of lieutenant, captain, major, lieutenant colonel, colonel, and general. The two sides differed, however, in the rankings of their general officers. The Union maintained three ranks-brigadier general, major general, and lieutenant general, with only the most senior officer achieving this last rank. The Confederacy promoted officers to brigadier general, major general, lieutenant general, and general. Several officers achieved the designation of general with their seniority based on the date of their promotion.

Meet the Author

Michael Lee Lanning retired from the U.S. Army after more than twenty years of service. He is a decorated veteran of the Vietnam War, where he served as an infantry platoon leader and company commander. Lanning has written fourteen books on military history, including The Battle 100. He lives in Phoenix, Arizona.

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