Civil War Times, 1861-1865
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Civil War Times, 1861-1865

by Daniel Wait Howe
     
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781290334402
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
01/10/2012
Pages:
446
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.90(d)

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CHAPTER THREE CAMP, MARCH AND BATTLE In the general histories of the Civil War, and in the histories of great campaigns and battles, we get much information about noted generals, military strategy, and tactical maneuvers, but we gain a very imperfect idea of a soldier's daily life. Some phases of it, as seen in camp, on the march, and in battle, deserve fuller attention before going further in this narrative. When it was expected that a regiment would remain in one locality for a considerable period, camp was regularly laid out according to prescribed military regulations, with narrow lanes, on each side of which were the tents of the enlisted men. At the head of each lane were the tents of the line officers, the captains and lieutenants, and in rear of them were those of the regimental officers. In the first year of the war, tents in the shape of a letter A were furnished for the enlisted men, and wall tents for the line officers. The former were secured by ropes fastened to pegs driven into the ground. Small trenches were dug around them to keep out the water in rainy weather. If boards could be found they were floored; otherwise beds were made on the ground. There was no way of heating them and incold weather the fire was made in front, the men sleeping with their feet to the fire. The tents of the officers were provided with flies which were erected in the rear and were generally used as a sort of kitchen in which the officers ate their meals. The tents of the regimental officers were similar to those of the line officers but were larger and better. The enlisted men's tents were found to require too many wagons to haul them and, in 1862, what were familiarly known in thewestern army as "dog-tents" were introduced, the /9th getting its first supply while in camp at...

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