Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead (Claire DeWitt Series #1)

Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead (Claire DeWitt Series #1)

3.5 64
by Sara Gran, Carol Monda
     
 

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Claire DeWitt is not your average private investigator. She has brilliant skills of deduction and is an ace at discovering evidence. But Claire also uses her dreams, omens, and mind-expanding herbs to help her solve mysteries, and relies on Détection—the only book published by the great and mysterious French detective Jacques Silette before his…  See more details below

Overview


Claire DeWitt is not your average private investigator. She has brilliant skills of deduction and is an ace at discovering evidence. But Claire also uses her dreams, omens, and mind-expanding herbs to help her solve mysteries, and relies on Détection—the only book published by the great and mysterious French detective Jacques Silette before his death.

The tattooed, pot-smoking Claire has just arrived in post-Katrina New Orleans, the city she’s avoided since her mentor, Silette’s student Constance Darling, was murdered there. Claire is investigating the disappearance of Vic Willing, a prosecutor known for winning convictions in a homicide-plagued city. Has an angry criminal enacted revenge on Vic? Or did he use the storm as means to disappear? Claire follows the clues, finding old friends and making new enemies—foremost among them Andray Fairview, a young gang member who just might hold the key to the mystery.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Audio
Claire DeWitt can hack into police files, discover hidden evidence, and sort the innocent from the guilty because she’s the best detective in the world. And the mix of drugs she samples helps boost her confidence as she scours New Orleans in search of Vic Willing, a district attorney gone missing during Hurricane Katrina. But mostly, this procedural is about Claire shooting off her mouth and her gun in rapid succession. Carol Monda perfectly renders Claire’s sarcastic repartee and keeps this tightly paced narrative moving quickly. However, Monda struggles with accents, particularly the distinctive Cajun and Creole dialects of New Orleans. Nonetheless, she does produce a host of voices—some more distinct than others—for the book’s many characters and provides narration that is both engaging and entertaining. A Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hardcover. (June)
Associated Press Staff
“Beautifully written in a tight, quirky style that distinguishes Gran as one of the more original writers working today.”
—Associated Press
The Times-Picayune
“The mystery captures post-Katrina New Orleans like no other novel yet has . . .DeWitt’s mesmerizing character and memorable voice take your breath away.”
The Times-Picayune
Express (UK)
“The most unusual, intelligent thriller I have read for a long time.”
Express (UK)
BookPage
“Beautifully written in a tight, quirky style that distinguishes Gran as one of the more original writers working today.”
—Associated Press
The Atlantic
“The mystery captures post-Katrina New Orleans like no other novel yet has . . .DeWitt’s mesmerizing character and memorable voice take your breath away.”
The Times-Picayune
New York Times
“The most unusual, intelligent thriller I have read for a long time.”
Express (UK)
Philadelphia CityPaper
“The mystery of Vic Willing’s disappearance pulls you in, but Gran’s enticing characters will keep you hooked.”
BookPage
Salon
“With Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead, Gran elevates the detective story as literature and brings together a sophisticated mystery, a witty, antagonistic private eye, and a city she knows too well.”
—The Atlantic
Library Journal - Audio
Part mystic, part noir PI, Claire DeWitt returns to post-Katrina New Orleans to investigate the disappearance of a wealthy district attorney. She probes, observes, and consults her beloved manual, Détection. Full of wonderful, dark, evocative descriptions of characters and places, this tale may disappoint listeners just looking for a classic puzzle mystery. Reader Carol Monda does an excellent job of evoking a difficult world. Recommended for individuals interested in the nuances of human nature, human interactions, and the new New Orleans. ["This is not to be missed—Gran builds an addictive sense of anticipation with a fantastical frame. Highly recommended," read the review of the Houghton Harcourt hc, LJ 5/1/11.—Ed.]—I. Pour-El, Des Moines Area Community Coll., Boone, IA
From the Publisher
"Just when I begin to despair that the PI novel has worn out its welcome, a writer with a fresh take reminds me why I fell in love with the genre. Sara Gran has long specialized in shaking up and revitalizing other corners of the genre world, so it’s no surprise that she performs this same magic in CLAIRE DEWITT AND THE CITY OF THE DEAD. And while I confess to having very little objectivity about New Orleans and no credentials to judge its literary portrayal, this is a valuable addition to the (way too small) body of post-storm novels."—Laura Lippman

"Terrific. I love this book! Absolutely love it. This is the first fresh literary voice I've heard in years. Sara Gran recombines all the elements of good, solid story-telling and lifts something original from a well-loved form."—Sue Grafton

"I just burned through Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead, and it's the first truly fantastic book I've read this year. Gran's evocation of the exposed wounds of New Orleans - before and after the storm - is a master-class in descriptive and emotive writing, and Claire is one of the most exciting new characters in years; a Raymond Chandler heroine with just enough of an off-beat vibe to tilt the whole thing enticingly off-kilter. Everything here - from the smallest touches to the grander mythology setting the tone of the series - just sings."—Drew Williams, Little Professor Book Center

"Not your mother's girl detective, Claire DeWitt is a cool blend of Nancy Drew and Sid Vicious.  With Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead, Sara Gran has pulled the traditional female sleuth into the twenty-first century with a novel that's smart and hip, dark and funny.  I can't wait for the next one." - Alafair Burke, author of LONG GONE

"Gran (Dope, 2006, etc.) provides...a comically self-important detective and a searing portrait of post-Katrina New Orleans."—Kirkus Reviews

"As brash and bold as Sherlock Holmes himself, Claire DeWitt arrives in still-chaotic New Orleans 18 months after Katrina. She's been hired to investigate the disappearance of Vic Willing, a local prosecutor, who's not been heard from since the hurricane. Claire surprises the local gangtsa set with her unique bravado. One of them, Andray, is compelled to help her tap into the darkness of Katrina's aftermath. From there, Claire finds her answers. Mentored and deeply inspired by a famous French detective, the I Ching, and profoundly illuminating dreams, a complex Claire leads us into her own nightmares as well. VERDICT This is not to be missed-Claire is a moody, hip, and meticulous investigator. Gran (Dope; Come Closer) builds an addictive sense of anticipation with a fantastical frame. Alternately gritty and dreamy, this would appeal to those who liked Colson Whitehead's The Intuitionist and readers of Charlie Huston (e.g., The Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death). Highly recommended."—Library Journal STARRED

"Captivating"—Publishers Weekly, STARRED

"If there isn’t yet a subgenre called funky noir, this wacky PI novel could be a fragrant first...lots of fun."—Booklist

PRAISE FROM BOOKSELLERS (PRE-PUB TOUR)

"Thanks again for such a wonderful experience last week. I love how HMH and Algonquin are bringing writers to the booksellers ahead of publication date because it makes such a difference having that personal knowledge of the author. And when the authors are *awesome* like Sara is, it makes their books stand out more in my mind, and thus makes me more likely to try to handsell their books. Sure, we all try to sell the books we like and we think a customer will like, but when there's a personal connection with the author, it feels more like we're introducing new readers to not just a book, but a friend."—Emily Crowe, Odyssey Book Shop

"Sara Gran is awesome. Don’t let her small, bespectacled frame deceive you; she’s a firecracker with fascinating stories to tell, and she has an obvious, passionate love of her craft. I could have talked to her for hours. And I love her book so far; it’s terrifically different from so many other mysteries I’ve read. And with regard to New Orleans: she really knows her stuff. I DO very much like the pre-publicity dinners, and not just because of the free booze. It encourages me to read books I might not ordinarily pick up (*Sara’s being an exception, as it’s right up my alley), and talking at length with the author about why they wrote the book, their background, etc. all helps me to sell their book."—Hilary Emerson Lay, Spirit of '76 Bookstore "We had a blast with you, Carla and Sara. I think these sorts of pre-pub events are very worth it. I do believe they help generate enthusiasm for a book and an author which helps generate sales. Of course, Sara is an author that it's easy to be enthusiastic about. She's genuine, smart, fun and quick to forge connections. That is, we like her very much. Being a former bookseller, she's kin and you can feel that. In a good way. Like when you meet a cousin you barely know but like instantly. She's our cousin who has made good and we're sorry we don't get to see her more because she lives on the wrong side of the country."—Stan Hynds, Northshire Bookstore  "The novel, Gran's fourth, is difficult to categorize, offering a strangely appealing mix of the mystical and the hard-boiled. The book is beautifully written in a tight, quirky style that distinguishes Gran as one of the more original writers working today."—Bruce DeSilva, Associated Press

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781611742565
Publisher:
HighBridge Company
Publication date:
06/02/2011
Series:
Claire DeWitt Series, #1
Edition description:
Unabridged; 8.75 hrs
Pages:
8
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 5.90(h) x 0.90(d)

Read an Excerpt

1

"It’s my uncle," the man said on the phone. "He’s lost. We lost him in the storm."

"Lost?" I said. "You mean, he drowned?"

"No," the man said, distressed. "Lost. I mean, yeah, he probably drowned. Probably dead. I haven’t heard from him or anything. I can’t imagine how he could still be alive."

"So what’s the mystery?" I said.

A crow flew overhead as we talked. I was in Northern California, near Santa Rosa. I sat at a picnic table by a clump of redwoods. A blue jay squawked nearby. Crows used to be bad omens, but now they were so common that it was hard to say.

Omens change. Signs shifts. Nothing is permanent.

That night I dreamed I was back in New Orleans. I hadn’t been there in ten years. But now, in my dream, it was during the flood. I sat on a rooftop in the cool, dark night. Moonlight reflected off the water around me. It was quiet. Everyone was gone.

Across the street a man sat on another rooftop in a straight-backed chair. The man flickered in and out of focus like an old piece of film, burned through in spots from light. He was fifty or sixty, white, pale, just on this side of short, with salt-and-pepper hair and bushy eyebrows. He wore a three-piece black suit with a high collar and a black tie. He scowled.

The man looked at me sternly.

"If I told you the truth plainly," the man said, "you would not understand." His voice was scratchy and warped, like an old record. But I could still make out the tinge of a French accent. "If life gave you answers outright, they would be meaningless. Each detective must take her clues and solve her mysteries for herself. No one can solve your mystery for you; a book cannot tell you the way."

Now I recognized the man; it was, of course, Jacques Silette, the great French detective. The words were from his one and only book, Détection.

I looked around and in the black night I saw a light shimmering in the distance. As the light got closer I saw that it was a rowboat with a lantern attached to the bow.

I thought it had come to rescue us. But it was empty.

"No one will save you," Silette said from his rooftop. "No one will come. You are alone in your search; no friend, no lover, no God from above will come to your aid. Your mysteries are yours alone."

Silette faded in and out, flickering in the moonlight.

"All I can do is leave you clues," he said. "And hope that you will not only solve your mysteries, but choose carefully the clues you leave behind. Make your choices wisely, ma’moiselle. The mysteries you leave will last for lifetimes after you are gone.

"Remember: you are the only hope for those that come after you."

I woke up coughing, spitting water out of my mouth.

That morning I talked to my doctor about the dream. Then I called the man back. I took the case.

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What People are saying about this

Sue Grafton
“Terrific. I love this book! Absolutely love it. This is the first fresh literary voice I've heard in years. Sara Gran recombines all the elements of good, solid story-telling and lifts something original from a well-loved form.”
—Sue Grafton

Meet the Author

CAROL MONDA is a two-time Audie® Award-winning narrator, with over 15 years of experience. She is also a veteran actress and voiceover artist for stage, radio, television, and film.

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Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 64 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No spoilers in this post: I put off purchasing this book because I thought it might be a mediocre PI novel. I also don't really care for New Orleans. I was pleasantly surprised. I could not put this down. The main character is very authenttic and downright lovable. The story is witty and never takes itself too seriously. This is the best novel I have read in over a year. I highly recommend it. Awesome read!
Darcy Buckley More than 1 year ago
A different kind of detective novel. Read with an open mind. I look forward to uncovering more of Dewitt's mysteries.
DougMN More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book and found the character very entertaining and interesting. I cannot wait for the next in the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All the way through this book, I wasn't sure whether I loved or hated it, but at the end, I was blown away by it. Claire DeWitt is not someone I would ordinarily choose to spend time with, but she is a fascinating character. Gran, clearly, is brilliant.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting detective story - but the detective is a strung out drug addict - which I find detracts from the detecting part of the story. A very different type of detective story.
KPinBR More than 1 year ago
Very interesting novel with a great mix of philosophy and mystery. Claire is a unique protagonist who draws you into the story. The depiction of New Orleans is pretty spot on, surprised to see it isn't the author's home town. As a Louisiana resident Katrina and the healing that continues are very vivid. Sara Gran captured the way it haunts us.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book could have been good but it spiraled down so depressingly that I couldn't finish it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed many parts of the book. It was definitely a good read and different (in a good way) from other crime books that I have read. Some things that seem irrelevant do in fact serve a purpose. The main character Claire DeWitt is awesomely done!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you think you love New Orleans, be it the pre or post Katrina NOLA, you should read this book. If you like strong, unusual, real female characters, you should read this book. If you expect perfect grammar, syntax, & plot development, you probably won't enjoy this book. If looking at the seamier, darker side of life (including all the people who inhabit this part of our world) upsets you, do not read this book. If you're more interested in the characters than the "mystery," you should read this book; you won't be disappointed! AW
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the worst I've read. Ridiculous premise that PI's are important and abundant, and the protagonist is a ,drug-addled lunatic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book as the main character is not like just any PI. Look forward to enjoying the rest of the series
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Will buy it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Just try it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a fun read but the grammatical errors are so glaring that it disrupts the flow. These are not typos or spelling errors, but fundamental grammatical errors, such as the difference between "few" and "less." This is told in the first person, so perhaps the author thought she had to create a personna outside of the direct dialog. If that us the case, it is unfortunate as it is jarring, when read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
paulettejane More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be weird and depressing. Not much to recommend about it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So glad I only spent $3... Didn't particularly enjoy this and the frequent use of "you know" throughout the story is annoying. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hoyacop More than 1 year ago
It was an interesting story. As a retired police officer, some of the heroine's escapades were a little hard to accept (and I realize that law enforcement in New Orleans is, historically, different, and after Katrina, even more so). Upon further reflection, I could have better spent my time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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