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Clara Barton: Founder of the American Red Cross
     

Clara Barton: Founder of the American Red Cross

by Christin Ditchfield
 
Clara Barton was a painfully shy child who grew up to become a courageous humanitarian. She first worked as a teacher. Later, during the Civil War, she tended to wounded Union soldiers, earning her the nickname "Angel of the Battlefield." While traveling in Europe, she learned about the International Red Cross, a volunteer group dedicated to taking care of people

Overview

Clara Barton was a painfully shy child who grew up to become a courageous humanitarian. She first worked as a teacher. Later, during the Civil War, she tended to wounded Union soldiers, earning her the nickname "Angel of the Battlefield." While traveling in Europe, she learned about the International Red Cross, a volunteer group dedicated to taking care of people during wartime. Barton worked with the International Red Cross, helping with its efforts to aid civilians during the Franco-Prussian War. Barton worked tirelessly to create a Red Cross in the United States, lobbying politicians in Washington, D.C. She became the founder and first president of the American Red Cross and introduced programs to help victims of natural disasters as well as victims of war.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Ditchfield peels away the layers of myth that often surround heroic figures and then paints a picture of a real flesh and blood woman. Most children know Barton as the founder of the American Red Cross and a tireless nurse to Civil War wounded. But do they know that she was fine teacher, opened the first free public school in New Jersey, and brought order out of chaos in the U. S. Patent Office? The baby of her family, Clara was a shy and fearful child who was once sent to a boarding school to help her overcome her fear of strangers. The school left the child so distraught that her health failed. A seemingly self-assured, natural leader, Barton was plagued by self-doubt and severe depression throughout her life. It is this paradox that underscores her whole life and which the author addresses with honesty. Barton, called the "Angel of the Battlefield," was tender and caring in her ministries, but tough and outspoken when fighting for supplies or convincing government agencies for aid. It was this same take charge attitude that caused her to lose temporary control of the Red Cross and brought about her retirement. She was single by choice had a full-time career in an era when women stayed in the background. In her later years Barton worked with Susan B. Anthony to secure voting rights for women so that men would not have to "carry the burdens of the world alone." A prolific writer of letters and diaries, Barton left a written legacy that this author has drawn upon for accuracy in her description of Barton's life and times. Well documented with photos and drawing, this biography goes beyond the typical book report portrayal and is a compelling and informative. It accomplishes its goal ofgiving an intimate look into the dreams, struggles and, triumphs of its subject. A timeline is appended along with a bibliography and online sites. The book is part of the 'Great Life Stories' series. 2004, Watts, Ages 10 to 14.
—Beverley Fahey

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531122761
Publisher:
Scholastic Library Publishing
Publication date:
03/01/2004
Series:
Great Life Stories Series
Pages:
111
Product dimensions:
7.60(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
910L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 13 Years

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