The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World O by Samuel P. Huntington | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order

The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order

3.9 26
by Samuel P. Huntington
     
 

ISBN-10: 0684844419

ISBN-13: 9780684844411

Pub. Date: 01/28/1998

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Based on the author's seminal article in Foreign Affairs, Samuel P. Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order is a provocative and prescient analysis of the state of world politics after the fall of communism. In this incisive work, the renowned political scientist explains how "civilizations" have replaced

Overview

Based on the author's seminal article in Foreign Affairs, Samuel P. Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order is a provocative and prescient analysis of the state of world politics after the fall of communism. In this incisive work, the renowned political scientist explains how "civilizations" have replaced nations and ideologies as the driving force in global politics today and offers a brilliant analysis of the current climate and future possibilities of our world's volatile political culture.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780684844411
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Publication date:
01/28/1998
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations: Tables, Figures, Maps ..... 11
Preface ..... 13
1: The New Era in World Politics ..... 19
2: Civilizations in History and Today ..... 40
3: A Universal Civilization? Modernization and Westernization ..... 56
4: The Fading of the West: Power, Culture, and Indigenization ..... 81
5: Economics, Demography, and the Challenger Civilizations ..... 102
6: The Cultural Reconfiguration of Global Politics ..... 125
7: Core States, Concentric Circles, and Civilizational Order ..... 155
8: The West and the Rest: Intercivilizational Issues ..... 183
9: The Global Politics of Civilizations ..... 207
10: From Transition Wars to Fault Line Wars ..... 246
11: The Dynamics of Fault Line Wars ..... 266
12: The West, Civilizations, and Civilization ..... 301
Notes ..... 323
Index ..... 353

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The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have long thought that we are taking a lot of things for granted: peace and world order, which are almost synonims, the affluence of the West, the future itself of our civilisation. Often, contemporary times make me think of Athens and its rule of the sea notwithstanding Admiral Mahan's fascinating book, it collapsed in the clash with a land based power as Sparta. This book shows that we are not far from experiencing once again that history has a tendency to repeat itself, although this is not easily perceived by contemporaries. This boook also dispels any misconceptions we may entartain about our future
Guest More than 1 year ago
Published in 1996, Huntington's book is stunningly prescient given the events of 9-11. He begins by mapping and describing his paradigm of the world's eight current major civilizations: Sinic, Islamic, Hindu, Western, Latin American, African, Orthodox, and Japanese. Much of the book is dedicated to an exposition of the relative rise and fall in fortunes of each. His well-argued thesis is that Western Civilization, led by its core state--the U.S., has been and continues to be in a period of relative decline versus other civilizations. These civilizations, namely Sinic (Chinese) and Islamic, perceive themselves superior and dominating over the long run. The demographic and economic forces propelling these civilizations are lucidly discussed and backed with statistical evidence which is compelling if not disturbing. His analysis of the threatening potential of Sinic and Islamic civilizations to the West is sobering without being xenophobic. His discussion of the role of the West and U.S. in the Soviet-Afghanistan war and the Bosnian-Serb-Croatian conflict provides valuable insight into the causes for the circumstances in which we now find ourselves. Make no mistake, this is a challenging albeit accessible work that requires some intellectual digestion. However, if you're looking a meaningful read about today's world---and the root causes of terrorism and wars that go beyond the usual trite and politically correct explanations of 'poverty and ignorance'---then read this book. It will be much more meaningful than the current flood of books on Afghanistan which either focus on either travel anecdotes or second-hand information (much of it probably wrong) on Osama bin Laden.
DJSolomon More than 1 year ago
Huntington's "Clash of Civilization" is both enlightening and frightening. His analysis of Western civilization and the relative decline it is experiencing scares the Western reader,though his assertions are sourced with good information and backed up with eye-pleasing maps and charts. His analysis is also prescient and in certain passages borders on prophetic. His predictions on a broad conflict that would erupt between the West and Islam have proven true and he has called other smaller crises like the Greek inability to exist in the EU and the ethnic tensions that are tearing apart countries like the Ukraine. Though the book is heavy on policy, predictions,and analysis,it is accessible to the non-expert reader and for its genre is quite engaging. It is overall an excellent read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is one of the important political works written in recent times. Its idea of a clash of civilizations accurately reflects much of what is presently happening in the world.He is especially strong in pointing out the present problematic state of Islamic civilization, and how its internal problems are pushing it to be the number one promulgator of violence and aggression on the present world- scene. Huntington's list of six or seven major civilizations and his conception of the clashes taking place between them, certainly does not exhaust our ways of interpreting present political reality. Perhaps he does not make enough of the gap which has emerged between the United States and Europe. Nor does he give enough emphasis to the fact that the United States seems to stand above, and often even over against all other political groups in the world. Nonetheless this is a very rich and highly recommended work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
the argument is really strong although the idea is arguable. is civilization the force that ultimately counts? just look at the development of the relationship between mainland China and taiwan. also, the economic power of different civilizations shows a different trend from that predicted in the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The sections on the resurgence of Islam and it's fascist tendencies has proven to be prophetic. Beginning with the oil boom of the 70s, scholars and religious teachers gained a foothold in Muslim countries and taught hate and radicalism, and were supported in many instances by their governments. The murders, rapes, subjugation, and oppression of non-muslims in their lands and beyond is what we see today. However, the book is filled with way too many nominalizations and vague generalizations to be of much practical use to policy makers in my mind. Reviews of each particular culture would be more beneficial, and there are some non-apologist and objective ones out there.
sandhammer More than 1 year ago
When reading The Clash of Civilizations my geology background suddenly flashed plate tectonics and my whole understanding of world order and history changed. The complex suddenly became so understandable as to seem simple. This is a must read book. Enjoy a Eureka Moment of you own!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
He ignores facts and whole bodies of discussion about world events. This book is eniterly too naive about the causality of interational conflict and propagates a xenophobic mentality that is dangerous in the world we live in, a globalized one. In conlcusion, I would like to quote one of the professional reviewers. I believe his statement lucidely described the problems with this book: From Fred Halliday - New Statesman: Of all the broad-sweep books on the post-cold war world Huntington's is without doubt the worst and the most pernicious. It is the worst because it is careless with facts, ignorant of history and indifferent to the whole range of social theory that has, with due care, looked at such issues as culture, socialisation and tradition. . . . For a book that claims to be about different civilisations, it is striking that all the references are to books in English. Huntington is pernicious because he fuels myths about cultural conflict, and reinforces those who seek to consolidate relativist, community-based authority.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I will make this short but sweet. First off this book is merely an update on a past work Huntington worked on called Clash of Civilizations, he simply added this title at the end in response to the new world after the Cold War ended once he was going to publish a book. This work holds some great points and unlimited 'facts' on the two civilizations that now oppose each other. Of course Huntington doesn't seem to want to bother with the fact of 'why' just more along the lines of 'inevitable.' The realities of the clash between the West and Middle East springs from various conflicts non of which are actually due to an inevitable clash due to our civilization. This book steers clear of answering the bigger questions on Why are we in a conflict at all and just simply brings old Cold War theories on a new plate. If you really wish for a great perspective into the Conflict between the West and the Middle East then read everything ever written by, the late, Edward Said. Instead of pointing a finger Mr. Said goes into detailed works on our past relations with the Middle East, Current Conflicts and the Culture of the Middle East in reflection to ours. Please read this book, but do so with care and in reflection with other writings. This kind of dogma leads to Xenophobia and 'justified' opposition.