Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio [NOOK Book]

Overview

A small culturally mixed community living an apartment building in the center of Rome is thrown into disarray when one of the neighbors is murdered. An investigation ensues and as each of the victimÕs neighbors is questioned, the reader is offered an all-access pass into the most colorful neighborhood in contemporary Rome. Each character takes his or her turn center-stage, Ògiving evidence,Ó recounting his or her storyÑthe dramas of emigration, the daily equivocations of immigration, the fears and ...
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Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio

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Overview

A small culturally mixed community living an apartment building in the center of Rome is thrown into disarray when one of the neighbors is murdered. An investigation ensues and as each of the victimÕs neighbors is questioned, the reader is offered an all-access pass into the most colorful neighborhood in contemporary Rome. Each character takes his or her turn center-stage, Ògiving evidence,Ó recounting his or her storyÑthe dramas of emigration, the daily equivocations of immigration, the fears and misunderstandings of a life spent on societyÕs margins, abused by mainstream cultureÕs fears and indifference, preconceptions and insensitivity. What emerges is a touching story that is common to us all, whether we live in Rome or in Los Angeles. This novel is animated by a style that is as colorful as the neighborhood it describes and is characterized by seemingly effortless equipoise that borrows from the cinematic tradition of the Commedia Italiana, as exemplified by directors such as Federico Fellini and Mario Monicelli. At the heart of this bittersweet comedy told with affection and sensitivity is a social reality that we tend to gloss over and a surprisingly exact anthropological analysis of this reality that cannot fail to fascinate.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Lakhous's prize-winning second novel is a social satire and murder mystery concerning an immigrant-filled apartment complex in Rome. After a murder in the building elevator, each occupant of the Piazza Vittorio-among these, Parviz Mansoor Samadi, an Iranian chef who detests pizza; Benedetta Esposito, an aging concierge from Naples; Iqbal Amir Allah, a Bangladeshi shopkeeper-gets a chapter to relate the truth as he or she knows it (or wants it known), apparently to the police. The odd man out, and the main suspect, is Amedo, a man believed by his neighbors to be a native Italian. The tenants are by turns outraged, disillusioned, defensive and afraid, and their frequently wild testimony teases out intriguing psychological and social insight alongside a playful whodunit plot, exposing the power of fear, racial prejudice and cultural misconception to rob a neighborhood of its humanity. (Oct.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
La Repubblica
The real protagonist here is the piazza itself, its life made up of many lives intertwined, its chaotic vitality. Read this book, it's well worth the effort. It represents a new look at a new city.
Corriere della Sera
Enthralling, funny, playful.
Liberazione
An authentic publishing success . . . This is the first time that a writer born outside of Italy has created a text that can be considered thoroughly Italian.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781609450434
  • Publisher: Europa
  • Publication date: 9/30/2008
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 122,117
  • File size: 409 KB

Meet the Author

Amara Lakhous was born in Algiers in 1970. He has a degree in philosophy from the University of Algiers and another in cultural anthropology from the University La Sapienza, Rome. He recently completed a Ph.D. thesis entitled "Living Islam as a Minority." His first novel, Le Cimici e il Pirata(Bedbugs and the Pirate), was published in 1999. Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio, winner of Italy's prestigious Flaiano prize, is his second novel. He lives in Italy.

About the Translator
Ann Goldstein is an editor at The New Yorker. Her translations include work by Pope John Paul II, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Primo Levi. For Europa Editions, she has translated three novels by Elena Ferrante (The Days of Abandonment, Troubling Love, The Lost Daughter) and The Worst Intentions by Alessandro Piperno. She has been the recipient of the PEN Renato Poggioli Translation Award and was a visiting scholar at the American Academy in Rome.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 16, 2014

    We may not be who we seem to be.

    This is a very peculiar little book that I will have to read again. The characters by themselves are interesting; but the scene changes made it a little challenging to remember how everyone fits into the story.
    I would recommend this to readers who are up for something off beat with just enough intrigue to entice you to read to the end.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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