Clashes of Cavalry

Clashes of Cavalry

by Thom Hatch
     
 
This is the story of two remarkable men, both natural-born cavalry leaders of great courage, who shared similar traits. Their Civil War legacies were destined to be connected in a series of battles-beginning with Brandy Station where Custer's star rapidly rose; at Gettysburg where Stuart's star became tarnished, and continuing to Yellow Tavern where Stuart was killed.

Overview

This is the story of two remarkable men, both natural-born cavalry leaders of great courage, who shared similar traits. Their Civil War legacies were destined to be connected in a series of battles-beginning with Brandy Station where Custer's star rapidly rose; at Gettysburg where Stuart's star became tarnished, and continuing to Yellow Tavern where Stuart was killed. Clashes of Cavalry takes an innovative approach to chronicling the lives of these two Civil War giants by not only depicting their lives and exploits individually, but also by examining the role of each in specific battles in which they both participated. Thom Hatch is a freelance writer and historian. He is the author of Custer and the Battle of the Little Bighorn: An Encyclopedia and The Encyclopedia of the Alamo and the Texas Revolution. His next book, The Custer Companion, will be published by Stackpole in Fall 2002.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Hatch (Custer and the Battle of the Little Bighorn, 1997) acquaints readers with the well-known lives and military accomplishments of his colorful protagonists: Custer, the fun-loving West Point cadet who graduated at the bottom of his class with 726 demerits; and Stuart, a fellow classmate and self-styled Virginia aristocrat who shunned the "hireling professions" of law and commerce for the battlefield. The author skillfully interweaves the extraordinary wartime exploits of both men from First Manassas until Stuart's death at Yellow Tavern on May 11, 1864. He offers Stuart as a foppish master showman whose meteoric rise as the "Beau Sabreur" declines after Brandy Station and Gettysburg, largely owing to his willfulness and bad judgment. By comparison, the late-blooming Custer is seen to eclipse Stuart's reputation through his daring generalship, ability to survive lackluster superiors, and substantial contribution to Lincoln's 1864 reelection by driving Confederate troops from the Shenandoah Valley. Hatch's concluding chapter summarizes the strengths and weaknesses of both cavalry commanders, and, surprisingly enough, he disappoints by declining to choose the better man, although his entire study argues for Custer. The scholarship is sound, and maps of the subjects' raids and engagements are helpful. Recommended for Civil War collections at most libraries. John Carver Edwards, Univ. of Georgia Libs., Athens Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780811703567
Publisher:
Stackpole Books
Publication date:
07/01/2001
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
2
Product dimensions:
6.32(w) x 9.33(h) x 1.12(d)

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