Class, Race, Gender, and Crime: The Social Realities of Justice in America [NOOK Book]

Overview

A decade after its first publication, Class, Race, Gender, and Crime remains the only non-edited book to systematically address the impact of class, race, and gender on criminological theory and all phases of the administration of criminal justice, including its workers. These topics represent the main sites of inequality, power and privilege in the U.S., which consciously or unconsciously shape people's understandings of who is a criminal and ...
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Class, Race, Gender, and Crime: The Social Realities of Justice in America

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NOOK Book (eBook - Third Edition)
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Overview

A decade after its first publication, Class, Race, Gender, and Crime remains the only non-edited book to systematically address the impact of class, race, and gender on criminological theory and all phases of the administration of criminal justice, including its workers. These topics represent the main sites of inequality, power and privilege in the U.S., which consciously or unconsciously shape people's understandings of who is a criminal and how society should deal with them.

The third edition has been thoroughly updated and revised. Maintaining the accessible, high-interest narrative from previous editions, it incorporates current data, recent theoretical developments, and new examples ranging from Bernie Madoff and the recent financial crisis to the increasing impact of globalization, in addition to classic examples. This edition also features a revised structure to better tailor the book for use in the classroom. Part I now provides an introduction to criminology and criminal justice. Part II introduces foundational information on the key concepts of class and economic privilege, race/ethnicity and white privilege, gender and male privilege, and the intersections of these privileges. And Part III examines victimization, criminal law, criminal prosecution, and punishment, looking at each through the lenses of class, race, and gender.
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Editorial Reviews

Criminal Justice Review
Praise for the second edition: The authors do a fine job of making their arguments and supporting them with current research and data. People familiar with the critical criminology perspective will enjoy the work and may take away something they have not thought about. Those not familiar with the critical perspective will most likely learn a great deal and appreciate the different perspective that critical criminology provides.
Katheryn Russell-Brown
It's all here. Barak, Flavin, and Leighton demonstrate how class, race, gender, and crime—four explosive topics we're reluctant to talk about publicly—are interrelated and, more importantly, how these issues affect each and every one of us. For the authors, "class" is not shorthand for the poor but includes the middle class and the upper class; "gender" is not shorthand for women but includes men; "race" is not shorthand for minorities, but includes Whites; and "crime" is not shorthand for street crime but includes the crimes of the rich and powerful.
Jeffrey Reiman
Barak, Flavin and Leighton don't only promise to integrate class, race and gender analyses of criminal justice, they deliver! Class, Race, Gender & Crime starts by giving readers a basic understanding of the perspectives of the concepts as they function in history and in social analysis. Subsequent chapters approach dimensions of criminal justice policy and practice, first in terms of each subject taken separately, and then as the three intersect. Conclusions are well-reasoned, and supported with up-to-date research and statistics. Chapters are introduced with striking examples from history, news stories or popular culture; and text is written in lively and straightforward language: clear enough for beginning students of criminal justice or criminology, meaty enough for advanced undergrads and grad students. All will be challenged to think freshly and critically about criminal justice in America.
Nancy A. Wonders
Class, Race, Gender, and Crime: The Social Realities of Justice in America is highly recommended for those who wish to learn more about the complex ways that race, class and gender condition the experience of justice - and injustice - in the United States. This book exposes the powerful and complex relationship between identity, structured social inequality, law, and the everyday practice of justice. The strengths of the new edition include its extended discussion of victimization, criminal justice practice, and policy, as well as its interrogation of the role of law and media in the social construction of difference. Students in my classes praise the text for its readability, conceptual clarity, rich examples, and contemporary relevance - it's an informative and engaging read!
Criminal Justive Review, December 2007 - Ellen C. Lemley
The authors do a fine job of making their arguments and supporting them with current research and data. People familiar with the critical criminology perspective will enjoy the work and may take away something they have not thought about. Those not familiar with the critical perspective will most likely learn a great deal and appreciate the different perspective that critical criminology provides.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742599710
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 7/16/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Third Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 334,831
  • File size: 542 KB

Meet the Author

Gregg Barak is professor of criminology and criminal justice at Eastern Michigan University. He is the author of a number of books, including Criminology: An Integrated Approach, and is the editor of the series Issues in Crime and Justice.
Paul Leighton is professor of criminology and criminal justice at Eastern Michigan University. He has written several books, including Punishment for Sale: Private Prisons, Big Business, and the Incarceration Binge.
Jeanne Flavin is associate professor of sociology at Fordham University. She is the author of Our Bodies, Our Crimes: The Policing of Women's Reproduction in America.
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Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables
Preface
Introduction
PART I
Chapter 1: Criminology and the Study of Class, Race, Gender, and Crime
Chapter 2: Criminal Justice Work and the Crime Control Enterprise
PART II
Chapter 3: Understanding Class and Economic Privilege
Chapter 4: Understanding Race and White Privilege
Chapter 5: Understanding Gender and Male Privilege
Chapter 6: Understanding Privilege and the Intersections of Class, Race, and Gender
PART III
Chapter 7: Victimology and Patterns of Victimization
Chapter 8: Law Making and the Administration of Criminal Law
Chapter 9: Law Enforcement and Criminal Prosecution
Chapter 10: Punishment, Sentencing, and Imprisonment
Conclusion
References
Name Index
Subject Index
About the Authors
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