Class Representation In Modern Fiction And Film [NOOK Book]

Overview

'Rich girl meets poor boy who liberates her then dies.' Or, 'low-life girl is trashed by lower-life boy.' The contemporary middle-class fictions of poverty that inform films such as Titanic and Kids are a far cry from the nineteenth-century genres: rags-to-riches stories and seduction tales. Our fictions of class turn the older tales upside down. By the surprising juxtaposition of recent films and the classic writings and unusual lives of Zora Neale Hurston, Stephen Crane, Henry Miller, and Michel Foucault, the book shocks the reader into a
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Class Representation In Modern Fiction And Film

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NOOK Book (eBook - Annotated edition)
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Overview

'Rich girl meets poor boy who liberates her then dies.' Or, 'low-life girl is trashed by lower-life boy.' The contemporary middle-class fictions of poverty that inform films such as Titanic and Kids are a far cry from the nineteenth-century genres: rags-to-riches stories and seduction tales. Our fictions of class turn the older tales upside down. By the surprising juxtaposition of recent films and the classic writings and unusual lives of Zora Neale Hurston, Stephen Crane, Henry Miller, and Michel Foucault, the book shocks the reader into a reappraisal of these authors' works and lives, our myths about class, and poststructural theory.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This provocative study looks at the intersection of the literary and filmic in terms of what Richard Sennett and Jonathan Cobb called "the hidden injuries of class".....a stimulating discussion that should generate further examination by scholars of class in American literature and society."—Choice

“In this highly original study Gandal demonstrates how preoccupations with race and gender not only obscure but, in fact, contribute to the class-based exploitation that is a staple of modern American culture, whether in iconoclastic figures such as Zora Neale Hurston and Henry Miller or in Hollywood blockbusters. This unusual and provocative book deserves a wide audience.”—Eric J. Sundquist, UCLA

“Uniquely blending film criticism and literary analysis, Gandal’s book offers one of the most nuanced accounts yet of the archetypal patterns that have shaped our stories about the poor, and the way these patterns get reflected and refracted in contemporary movies. This is an important contribution not only to the growing awareness of poverty and class inequality in American society and culture but also to our critical capacity to decode the intricate politics of form that underlies popular media representation.”—Gavin Jones, Stanford University

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780230260795
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 4/17/2007
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Annotated edition
  • File size: 268 KB

Meet the Author

Keith Gandal is Professor of English at Northern Illinois University outside of Chicago. He is the author of The Virtues of the Vicious: Jacob Riis, Stephen Crane, and the Spectacle of the Slum (1997). He is also the author of a novel, Cleveland Anonymous (2002). He holds a Ph.D. from the University of California-Berkeley.

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Table of Contents

An Apology for Studying Class, not Culture

Pt. I Slumming Drama

Award-Winning Hollywood Blockbusters

A Shameful Look at Zora Neale Hurston

Pt. II Class and Status Trauma

Nauseating Indie Films

A Spiritual Autopsy of Stephen Crane

Pt. III Slumming Trauma

The Cult Film Fight Club

Henry Miller and the Embrace of Defilement

Michel Foucault's Shame: Epistemology in a Closet

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