CLASSIC EUROPEAN SEX EROTICA: VENUS IN FURS (Sex and Erotica Collection) by Sacher Masoch FOR ADULTS AND MATURE READERS ONLY [Nook Edition] NOOKbook Sex Classics Explicit Content and Sexual References Sexuality Bondage Spanking S&M BDSM Sado-Masochism

CLASSIC EUROPEAN SEX EROTICA: VENUS IN FURS (Sex and Erotica Collection) by Sacher Masoch FOR ADULTS AND MATURE READERS ONLY [Nook Edition] NOOKbook Sex Classics Explicit Content and Sexual References Sexuality Bondage Spanking S&M BDSM Sado-Masochism

by Sacher Masoch
     
 

CLASSIC EUROPEAN SEX EROTICA: VENUS IN FURS
(Sex and Erotica Collection)
by Sacher Masoch

FOR ADULTS AND MATURE READERS ONLY [Nook Edition]

NOOKbook Sex Classics Explicit Content and Sexual References Sexuality Bondage Spanking S&M Sado-Masochism

Parental Warning: For Adults Only


ABOUT S&M, SADISM AND MASOCHISM
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Overview

CLASSIC EUROPEAN SEX EROTICA: VENUS IN FURS
(Sex and Erotica Collection)
by Sacher Masoch

FOR ADULTS AND MATURE READERS ONLY [Nook Edition]

NOOKbook Sex Classics Explicit Content and Sexual References Sexuality Bondage Spanking S&M Sado-Masochism

Parental Warning: For Adults Only


ABOUT S&M, SADISM AND MASOCHISM

"Sadism" and "Masochism" were originally derived from the names of two authors, Marquis de Sade and Leopold von Sacher-Masoch respectively, based on their popular writings.

The German psychiatrist Richard von Krafft-Ebing introduced the terms "Sadism" and "Masochism" into institutional medical terminology in his work Neue Forschungen auf dem Gebiet der Psychopathia sexualis ("New research in the area of Psychopathology of Sex") in 1890.


ABOUT VENUS IN FURS

The novel concerns a man who dreams of speaking to Venus about love while she wears furs. The unnamed narrator tells his dreams to a friend, Severin, who tells him how to break him of his fascination with cruel women by reading a manuscript, Memoirs of a Suprasensual Man.

This manuscript tells of a man, Severin von Kusiemski, so infatuated with a woman, Wanda von Dunajew, that he requests to be treated as her slave, and encourages her to treat him in progressively more degrading ways. At first Wanda does not understand or relate to the request, but after humouring Severin a bit she finds the advantages of the method to be interesting and enthusiastically embraces the idea; though at the same time, she disdains Severin for allowing her to do so.

Severin describes his feelings during these experiences as suprasensuality. Severin and Wanda travel to Florence. Along the way, Severin takes the generic Russian servant's name of "Gregor" and the role of Wanda's servant. In Florence, Wanda treats him brutally as a servant, and recruits a trio of African women to dominate him.

The relationship arrives at a crisis point when Wanda herself meets a man to whom she would like to submit, a Byronic hero known as Alexis Papadopolis. At the end of the book, Severin, humiliated by Wanda's new lover, loses the desire to submit. He says of Wanda:

"That woman, as nature has created her, and man at present is educating her, is man's enemy. She can only be his slave or his despot, but never his companion. This she can become only when she has the same rights as he and is his equal in education and work."


EXCERPT

"Well, how do you feel now, half broken on the wheel?"

Her piercing green eyes rested on me with a peculiar mocking satisfaction. Overcome by desire, I flung myself down before her, and threw my arms about her.

"Yes—you have awakened my dearest dream," I cried. "It has slept long enough."

"And this is?" She put her hand on my neck.

I was seized with a sweet intoxication under the influence of this warm little hand and of her regard, which, tenderly searching, fell upon me through her half-closed lids.

"To be the slave of a woman, a beautiful woman, whom I love, whom I worship."

"And who on that account maltreats you," interrupted Wanda, laughing.

"Yes, who fetters me and whips me, treads me underfoot, the while she gives herself to another."

"And who in her wantonness will go so far as to make a present of you to your successful rival when driven insane by jealousy you must meet him face to face, who will turn you over to his absolute mercy. Why not? This final tableau doesn't please you so well?"

I looked at Wanda frightened.

"You surpass my dreams."

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013004672
Publisher:
Classic European Sex Erotica Press
Publication date:
12/11/2011
Series:
Classic European Sex Erotica | Sex Nook | Sex NOOKBook | Erotic Fiction
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
711,555
File size:
112 KB

Meet the Author

Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (27 January 1836 – 9 March 1895) was an Austrian writer and journalist, who gained renown for his erotic stories of bondage. The term masochism is derived from his name.

Sacher-Masoch and his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor signed a contract making him her slave for a period of six months, with the stipulation that the Baroness wear furs as often as possible, especially when she was in a cruel mood. Sacher-Masoch took the alias of "Gregor," a stereotypical male servant's name, and assumed a disguise as the servant of the Baroness. The two traveled by train to Italy. As in Venus in Furs, he traveled in the third-class compartment, while she had a seat in first-class, arriving in Venice (Florence, in the novel), where they were not known, and would not arouse suspicion.

Sacher-Masoch pressured his first wife, Aurora von Rümelin, whom he married in 1873, to live out the experience of the book, against her preferences.

The term masochism was invented in 1886 by the Austrian psychiatrist Richard Freiherr von Krafft-Ebing (1840–1902) in his book Psychopathia Sexualis:

...I feel justified in calling this sexual anomaly "Masochism," because the author Sacher-Masoch frequently made this perversion, which up to his time was quite unknown to the scientific world as such, the substratum of his writings. I followed thereby the scientific formation of the term "Daltonism", from Dalton, the discoverer of colour-blindness.

During recent years facts have been advanced which prove that Sacher-Masoch was not only the poet of Masochism, but that he himself was afflicted with the anomaly. Although these proofs were communicated to me without restriction, I refrain from giving them to the public. I refute the accusation that 'I have coupled the name of a revered author with a perversion of the sexual instinct,' which has been made against me by some admirers of the author and by some critics of my book. As a man Sacher-Masoch cannot lose anything in the estimation of his cultured fellow-beings simply because he was afflicted with an anomaly of his sexual feelings. As an author he suffered severe injury so far as the influence and intrinsic merit of his work is concerned, for so long and whenever he eliminated his perversion from his literary efforts he was a gifted writer, and as such would have achieved real greatness had he been actuated by normally sexual feelings.

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