Classical Monologues From Aeschylus to Bernard Shaw, Volume 2: Older Men's Roles

Overview

(Applause Books). Sure to become a mainstay of any actor's shelf, Applause is pleased to present the first two volumes of Leon Katz's monumental monologue collection. Covering the full scope of Western Drama, from the Greeks to the 20th Century, these two volumes contain over 250 monologues from sources other than Shakespeare's plays. The works range from the famous to the little-known, covering over 2,000 years of theatrical history. Katz provides an introduction to each monologue that provides an informative and critical context for actors,
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Overview

(Applause Books). Sure to become a mainstay of any actor's shelf, Applause is pleased to present the first two volumes of Leon Katz's monumental monologue collection. Covering the full scope of Western Drama, from the Greeks to the 20th Century, these two volumes contain over 250 monologues from sources other than Shakespeare's plays. The works range from the famous to the little-known, covering over 2,000 years of theatrical history. Katz provides an introduction to each monologue that provides an informative and critical context for actors, directors, students and teachers, but are also of relevance to general readers. Each volume is organized into Tragedy/Drama and Comedy divisions, and the monologues are helpfully arranged by period as well as chronologically. Also, the monologues are fully footnooted afor unfamiliar references and definitions and the bibliography provides exhaustive listings of sources for all the plays from which the monologues have been drawn. Simply put, these two volumes are a must for actors, directors, teachers and students of classical theatre!
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781557835765
  • Publisher: Hal Leonard Corporation
  • Publication date: 11/28/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 376
  • Product dimensions: 5.06 (w) x 7.81 (h) x 0.78 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Tragedy/Drama
Greek/Roman
1 Prometheus cries out against his suffering willed by Zeus ((468+ BC) Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, tr. D. Grene.) 2
2 The Chorus remembers the dead brought home from Troy ((458 BC) Aeschylus, Agamemnon, tr. L. Katz) 5
3 The Chorus condemns Helen for the ruin of Troy ((458 BC) Aeschylus, Agamemnon, tr. L. Katz) 8
4 Aegisthus rejoices in the death of Agamemnon ((458 BC) Aeschylus, Agamemnon, tr. L, Katz) 11
5 Ajax pretends to be reconciled to his shame ((450-440 BC) Sophocles, Ajax, tr. J. Moore) 14
6 Ajax bids farewell to the gods and Athens and falls on his sword ((450-440 BC) Sophocles, Ajax, tr. J. Moore) 17
7 Creon argues the case to his son against disloyalty and anarchy ((441 BC) Sophocles, Antigone, tr. Nicholas Rudall) 20
8 Tiresias violently condemns Creon's stubbornness and folly ((441 BC) Sophocles, Antigone, tr. Nicholas Rudall) 23
9 The Messenger recounts the death of Haemon to his mother ((441 BC) Sophocles, Antigone, tr. P. Arnott) 25
10 The Chorus hymns the wonders and limits of man ((441 BC) Sophocles, Antigone, tr. Elizabeth Wycoff) 28
11 Tiresias, provoked by Oedipus, reveals almost the whole of the oracle's pronouncement ((430-425 BC) Sophocles, Oedipus the King, tr. W. B. Yeats) 29
12 Oedipus confesses his haunting doubts to Jocasta ((430-425 BC) Sophocles, Oedipus the King, tr. W. B. Yeats) 32
13 Oedipus bids farewell to his daughters ((430-425 BC) Sophocles, Oedipus the King, tr. P. Arnott) 34
14 Oedipus condemns himself to exile and death ((430-425 BC) Sophocles, Oedipus the King, tr. D. Grene) 36
15 Theseus catigates his son Hippolytus for adultery ((428 BC) Euripides, Hippolytus, tr. D. Grene) 38
16 Peleus reviles Menelaus and his wife Helen ((417-415 BC) Euripides, Andromache, tr. M. Hadas and J. H. McLean) 41
17 Peleus, outraged at his army's treatment of Andromache, helps her to safety ((417-415 BC) Euripides, Andromache, tr. M. Hadas and J.H. McLean) 44
18 Heracles, dying in agony, curses the wife who sent him the poisoned shirt ((413 BC) Sophocles, The Women of Trachis, tr. M. Jameson) 46
19 Oedipus, unwilling to leave thebes, bemoans his destiny ((409 BC) Euripides, The Phoenician Women, tr. L. Katz) 50
20 Tiresias heatedly defends the god Dionysus against Pentheus' condemnation ((c408 BC) Euripides, The Bacchae, tr. M. Hadas and J. H. McLean) 53
21 The Herdsman reports to Pentheus the magical feats of the Bacchants on their awakening ((c408 BC) Euripides, The Bacchae, tr. M. Hadas and J. H. McLean) 57
22 Oedipus denounces his son Polyneices and prophesies his doom ((406 BC) Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus, tr. R. Fitzgerald) 60
23 Oedipus gives his blessing to Athens and goes to his death ((406 BC) Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus, tr. R. Fitzgerald) 62
24 Oedipus defends himself against the charge of incest and patricide ((c50-65 AD) Seneca, Oedipus, tr. E. I. Harris, ad. L. Katz, Act 3, Sc. 1) 65
25 Oedipus, blinded and self-exiled, feels relieved by his fate ((c50-65 AD) Seneca, Oedipus, tr. E. I. Harris, ad. L. Katz, Act 5, Sc. 2 and 3) 68
26 Atreus plans his gruesome revenge on his brother Thyestes ((c50-65 AD) Seneca, Thyestes, tr. E. I. Harris, ad. L. Katz, Act 2, Sc. 1) 70
27 Atreus, gloating, observes Thyestes waking after feasting on his sons ((c50-65 AD) Seneca, Thyestes, tr. E. I. Harris, ad. L. Katz, Act 5, Sc. and 3) 73
28 Hercules, having in his madness destroyed his wife and sons, now longs to destroy himself ((c50-65 AD) Seneca, Mad Hercules, tr. E. I. Harris, Act 5, Sc. 1 and 3) 76
Elizabethan/Jacobean
29 The Spanish General narrates a tale of battle victory ((c1587; 1602) Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy, Act 1, Sc. 2) 82
30 Hieronymo discovers the body of his murdered son ((c1587; 1602) Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy, Act 2, Sc. 5) 85
31 Mad Hieronymo considers: "What is a son?" ((c1587; 1602) Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy, Act 3, Sc. 11) 88
32 Mad Hieronymo directs a painter to paint a murder ((c1587; 1602) Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy, Act 3, Sc. 12a) 91
33 Mad Hieronymo mistakes a suppliant for his dead son ((c1587; 1602) Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy, Act 3, Sc. 13) 94
34 Hieronymo brings the play-within-the-play to its gruesome end ((c1587; 1602) Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy, Act 4, Sc. 4) 97
35 Sejanus commits himself to a sanguine and limitless revenge ((1603) Ben Jonson, Sejanus, Act 2, Sc. 2) 101
36 Sejanus plans the secret assumption of Caesar's authority ((1603) Ben Jonson, Sejanus, Act 3, Sc. 2) 103
37 De Flores, suffering the contempt of his beloved Beatrice, bides his time ((1622) Thomas Middleton and William Rowley, The Changeling, Act 2, Sc. 1) 105
38 De Flores wins his whole recompense from Beatrice ((1622) Thomas Middleton and William Rowley, The Changeling, Act 3, Sc. 4) 108
39 Friar Bonaventura condemns Giovanni and urges penitence for his thought of incest ((1629-33) John Ford, 'Tis a Pity She's a Whore, Act 1, Scene 1) 112
XVII Century French
40 The father of Rodrigue determines to be revenged ((1638) Pierre Corneille, Le Cid, tr. Paul Landis, Act 1, Sc. 4) 116
41 The emporer Augustus ruminates on the futility of power ((1640) Pierre Corneille, Cinna, tr. Paul Landis, Act 2, Sc. 1) 117
42 The emperor Augustus undergoes his dark night of the soul ((1640) Pierre Corneille, Cinna, tr. Paul Landis, Act 4, Sc. 2) 121
43 The emperor Augustus reasons with his would-be assassin ((1640) Pierre Corneille, Cinna, tr. Paul Landis, Act 5, Sc. 1) 124
44 Theseus accuses his son of adultery ((1677) Jean Racine, Phaedra, tr. R. Henderson, Act 4) 127
Restoration
45 Samson, in torment, yearns for his death ((1668-70) John Milton, Samson Agonistes, Lines 606-651) 132
46 Milton's tragic conclusion: "Calm of mind, all passion spent" ((1668-70) John Milton, Samson Agonistes, Lines 1708-1758) 136
47 Antony mourns his fallen state ((1671) John Dryden, All for Love, Act 1, Sc. 1) 139
48 Antony accuses Cleopatra of being the instrument of his downfall ((1671) John Dryden, All for Love, Act 2, Sc. 1) 141
49 The Great Constable explains the folly of virtue to his son, his prisoner ((1679) John Crowne, The Ambitious Statesman, Act 5, Sc. 1) 144
50 Aboan, Oroonoko's loyal follower, rouses him to rebellion against the English ((1695) Thomas Southerne, Oroonoko, Act 3, Sc. 2) 146
XVIII Century English/German
51 Cato contemplates the allurement of immortality ((1713) Joseph Addison, Cato, Act 5, Sc. 1) 152
52 Thorowgood catechizes the blessings of commerce ((1731) George Lillo, The London Merchant, Act 3, Sc. 1) 155
53 Wallenstein inveighs against chance, not his own will, governing his acts ((1799) Friedrich Schiller, Wallenstein's Death, tr. Jeanne Wilson, Act 1, Sc. 4) 157
54 Wallenstein interprets a dream as a predestined savior of his life ((1799) Friedrich Schiller, Wallenstein's Death, tr. Jeanne Wilson, Act 2, Sc. 3) 161
XIX Century French/German
55 An Old Man brings news of death to a family, and wonders how to approach them ((1896) Maurice Maeterlinck, Home, tr. Richard Hovey, 1-act) 166
56 Cyrano defends his nose against insult, and runs the insulting culprit through ((1897) Edmond Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac, tr. Brian Hooker, Act 1) 169
57 Cyrano brags of his credo: To bend the knee to no one ((1897) Edmond Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac, tr. Brian Hooker, Act 2) 174
58 Cyrano, tottering but upright, sword drawn, meets death ((1897) Edmond Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac, tr. Brian Hooker, Act 5) 177
59 Robespierre concludes: In himself "the Son of Man is crucifed" ((1835) Georg Buchner, Danton's Death, tr. C. R. Mueller, Act I, Sc. 6) 181
60 Danton, bored and disenchanted, delays from arrest ((1835) Georg Buchner, Danton's Death, tr. C. R. Mueller, Act 2, Sc. 1) 184
61 Danton reconciles himself to despair and to imminent death ((1835) Georg Buchner, Danton's Death, tr. C. R. Mueller, Act 4, Sc. 1) 187
XIX/XX Century English
62 Cenci cries curses on Beatrice and prays for her destruction ((1819) Percy Shelley, The Cenci, Act 4, Sc. 1) 190
63 Virginius, having killed his daughter to prevent her enslavement and ruin, runs mad and searches for her ((1820) Amos Sheridan Knowles, Virginius, Act 5, Sc. 3) 193
64 Luke explains the justification for his revenge: his wife's death by starvation ((1826) John Baldwin Buckston, Luke the Laborer, Act 1, Sc. 2) 197
65 The Duke of Ferrara explains to a visitor the smile on his late duchess's face ((1842) Robert Browning, My Last Duchess) 199
66 Mathias, having successfully concealed his theft and murder for years, is troubled only by the sound of bells ((1871) Leopold Lewis, The Bells, Act 2) 202
67 Mathias, in nightmare, dreams he is under hypnosis, and overcome by his own confession of murderous guilt, dies ((1871) Leopold Lewis, The Bells, Act 3) 205
68 Jokanaan cries abomination on Herod, Herodias, and their daughter Salome ((1893) Oscar Wilde, Salome) 209
69 Herod offers Salome any treasure to relieve him of his oath to grant her the head of Jokanaan ((1893) Oscar Wilde, Salome) 212
70 Sherlock Holmes, while enjoying his seven-percent solution, anticipates the arrest and demise of Moriarty ((1899) William H. Gillette, Sherlock Holmes, Act 2, Sc. 2) 214
71 Mr. O'Connell, a Catholic of conscience, is asked for political reasons not to denounce his wife's adulterer ((1907) Harley Granville Barker, Waste, Act 3) 218
Comedy
Greek
72 Dicaeopolis speaks his mind about the stupid reasons for the current war ((425 BC) Aritophanes, The Acharnians, tr. Jack Flavin) 224
73 Aristophanes argues the case for his comedy's winning first prize ((421 BC) Aristophanes, Peace, tr. Fred Beake) 227
74 Mnesilochus, in drag at the women's festival, defends his nephew Euripides' attacks on women ((411 BC) Aristophanes, Thesmaphoriazusae, tr. Anonymous) 230
75 Blepyrus, needing to take a crap in the dead of night, has no choice but to wear his wife's clothing ((392 BC) Aristophanes, Ecclesiazusae, tr. Anonymous) 233
Italian Renaissance
76 Fra Timoteo persuades Lucrezia that it is pious to commit adultery ((c1515-20) Machiavelli, Mandragola, tr. Kenneth and Laura Richards, Act 3, Sc. 11) 236
Elizabethan/Jacobean
77 Simon Eyre prepares a feast for his king ((1599) Thomas Dekker, The Shoemaker's Holiday, Act 5, Sc. 4) 240
78 Captain Seagull peddles the glories of Virginia to dupes ((1604) Marston, Chapman, and Jonson, Eastward Ho!, Act 3, Sc. 3) 242
79 Touchstone reveals the sins of the shipwrecked to the constable ((1604) Marston, Chapman, and Jonson, Eastward Ho!, Act 4, Sc. 2) 244
80 Volpone welcomes the morning sun and his gold ((1606) Ben Jonson, Volpone, Act I, Sc. 1) 246
81 Volpone, disguised as a mountebank, hawks quack remedies ((1606) Ben Johnson, Volpone, Act 2, Sc. 1) 248
82 Morose, who can bear no noise, instructs his servant mute ((1609) Ben Johnson, Epicoene, or The Silent Woman, Act 2, Sc. 1) 251
83 Morose interviews a potentially silent wife ((1609) Ben Johnson, Epicoene, or The Silent Woman, Act 2, Sc. 5) 255
84 Sir Epicure Mammon prepares for projection's success ((1610) Ben Johnson, The Alchemist, Act 2, Sc. 2) 258
85 Allwit congratulates himself on the ease and profit of his cuckold's life ((1612) Thomas Middleton, A Chaste Maid of Cheapside, Act 1, Sc. 2) 261
86 Overreach tutors his daughter in marital entrapment ((1621-22) Philip Massinger, A New Way To Pay Old Debts, Act 3, Sc. 2) 264
XVII Century French
87 Arnolphe explains his procedure for raising a perfect wife in perfect ignorance ((1662) Jean-Baptiste Moliere, The School for Wives, tr. Morris Bishop, Act 1, Sc. 1) 268
88 Don Juan's father condemns his son for shaming his heritage ((1665) Jean-Baptiste Moliere, Don Juan, tr. G. Graveley and I. Maclean, Act 4, Sc. 6) 270
89 Harpagon, fearing his treasure stolen, runs mad ((1668) Jean-Baptiste Moliere, The Miser, tr. G. Graveley and I. Maclean, Act 4, Sc. 7) 272
Restoration
90 Pinchwife apprehends his wife authoring a letter of her own invention ((1675) William Wycherley, The Country Wife, Act 4) 276
91 Sir Feeble, with the help of his man Francis (his rival in disguise), readies for bedtime with his new bride ((1686) Aphra Behn, The Lucky Chance, Act 3. Sc. 1) 278
92 Jupiter, bidding farewell to Alcmene after their night of love, claims a higher place in her esteem than "husband" ((1690) John Dryden, Amphitryon, Act 2, Sc. 1) 281
93 Jupiter, out of the machine, makes all things clear ((1690) John Dryden, Amphitryon, Act 5, Sc. 1) 284
94 Fondlewife, while warning his wife of adultery, is melted by her tears ((1693) William Congreve, The Old Bachelor, Act 4, passage excerpted from Scs. 2, 3, 4) 286
95 Coupler the Matchmaker dreams up a scheme to get one brother wealthily wived at the expense of the other ((1696) John Vanbrugh, The Relapse, Act 1, Sc. 3) 288
XVIII Century English
96 Sable the Undertaker rehearses his regular mourners for the coming funeral ((1701) Richard Steele, The Funeral, Act 1, Sc. 1) 292
97 Puzzle the Attorneys explains the profit for lawyers of professional ofuscation and tautology ((1701) Richard Steele, The Funeral, Act 1, Sc. 2) 295
98 Sir Jealous Traffic, devoted to Spanish custom, confines his daughter to Spanish honor's constraints ((1709) Susannah Centlivre, The Busybody, Act 2, Sc. 2) 297
99 The merchant Sealand boldly counters Sir John's claims of aristocracy's privileged morality ((1722) Richard Steele, The Conscious Lovers, Act 4, Sc. 2) 299
100 Peachum considers which of his henchmen he will betray today for execution ((1728) John Gay, The Beggar's Opera, Act 1, Sc. 3) 302
101 Peachum warns against the evil of marriage ((1728) John Gay, The Beggar's Opera, Act 1, Sc. 4) 304
102 Macheath welcomes his ladies to the tavern with song ((1728) John Gay, The Beggar's Opera, Act 2, Sc. 4) 306
103 Sir Simon, after overhearing his wife's seducer's pleading, considers the fate of husbands ((1735) Henry Fielding, The Universal Gallant, Act 5) 308
104 Trapwit directs his actors and explains the play ((1736) Henry Fielding, Pasquin, Act 2, Sc. 1) 310
105 Fustian recites his play's dedication for the edification of his friends ((1736) Henry Fielding, Pasquin, Act 3, Sc. 1) 312
106 Fustian catalogues the miseries of the playwright ((1736) Henry Fielding, Pasquin, Act 4, Sc. 1) 314
107 Knowell notes how the greatest corrupters of children are their parents ((1751) Ben Jonson, Everyman in His Humour, ad. David Garrick, Act 2, Sc. 2) 315
108 Captain Bobadill explains how, with twenty men trained by himself, he could eradicate an army of forty thousand ((1751) Ben Jonson, Everyman in His Humour, ad. David Garrick, Act 4, Sc. 2) 318
109 Don John, mortified, finds himself saddled with a crying baby ((1754) Beaumont and Fletcher, The Chances, ad. David Garrick, Act 1, Sc. 5) 320
110 Sir Anthony Absolute, in a violent passion, demands his son marry as he commands, or else ((1775) Richard Brinsley Sheridan, The Rivals, Act 2, Sc. 1) 323
111 Sir Peter tries to fathom why his wife, always in the wrong, quarrels with him ((1777) Richard Brinsley Sheridan, The School for Scandal, Act 1, Sc. 2) 325
112 Censor is censorious against Mrs. Voluble's discourse ((1779) Francis Burney, The Witlings, Act 1, Sc. 1) 327
113 Dabbler the Poet is lost in the throes of composition ((1779) Francis Burney, The Witlings, Act 3, Sc. 1) 329
XIX Century German/Scandinavian
114 Straamand, the village pastor, defends his "barnyard fowl's" life against the poet Falk's "soaring eagle" ((1862) Henrid Ibsen, Love's Comedy, tr. M. Zelenak and L. Katz, Act 3) 334
115 Gulstad, who offers ordinary marriage, contends with Falk's passionate offer of the extraordinary ((1862) Henrik Ibsen, Love's Comedy, tr. M. Zelenak and L. Katz, Act 3) 336
116 Peer Gynt peels an onion which sums up his life ((1867) Henrik Ibsen, Peer Gynt, tr. Wm. Archer, Act 5, Sc. 5) 340
XIX/XX Century English
117 Sir Robert Chiltern confesses to the youthful crime that has given him his wealth and position ((1895) Oscar Wilde, An Ideal Husband, Act 2) 346
118 Julius Caesar reads the riddle of the sphinx ((1899) Bernard Shaw, Caesar and Cleopatra, Act 1) 348
119 Shaw, through the mouth of young Aubrey, mourns the unhinging of Western Civilization's values following the First World War ((1932) Bernard Shaw, Too True To Be Good, Act 3) 350
Glossary of Greek and Roman Names 355
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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2003

    Thank you.

    This is a gift to the theater. The incredible selection of monologues is a gift to actors who are constantly searching for classical pieces that aren¿t overdone. And it¿s a gift to all of us- the playwrights, the directors, the producers, the teachers- who are constantly forced to sit through hours and hours of overdone Shakespeare. The introductions are remarkably clear and precise, providing the context necessary for actors to make more specific, personal choices, which allows us to give more significant feedback, and in the long run, to make more appropriate decisions. The more people that have this book, the better the audition process will be for everybody in the theater.

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