Classics Of Public Budgeting / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$39.15
(Save 32%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 96%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (11) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $60.87   
  • Used (6) from $1.99   

Overview


Performance Based Budgetingis the next volume in the ASPA Classics series. It covers the most influential, paramount research articles published on public budgeting and finance. The book will surely be of great interest and use to anyone concerned with public budgeting, and anyone enrolled in, or teaching, a course on this topic in an MPA program or a doctoral program in public administration, public affairs, political science, or economics/public finance.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
An anthology of 28 research articles on modern public budgeting and finance, focusing on strengthening government accountability by tightening the link between budget decisions and government performance. The original publication dates range from 1952 to 1999. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813397740
  • Publisher: Westview Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/2000
  • Series: ASPA Classics Series
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 520
  • Lexile: 1450L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 1.16 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Meet the Author


Gerald J. Miller is associate professor of public administration at Rutgers University. W. Bartley Hildreth is a professor of public finance at the Hugo Wall School of Urban and Public Affairs, Wichita State University. Jack Rabin is a professor of public affairs at Penn State University. Gerald J. Miller is associate professor of public administration at Rutgers University. W. Bartley Hildreth is a professor of public finance at the Hugo Wall School of Urban and Public Affairs, Wichita State University. Jack Rabin is a professor of public affairs at Penn State University. Gerald J. Miller is associate professor of public administration at Rutgers University. W. Bartley Hildreth is a professor of public finance at the Hugo Wall School of Urban and Public Affairs, Wichita State University. Jack Rabin is a professor of public affairs at Penn State University.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Tables and Illustrations
Introduction 1
A Theory, Conceptualization, and Critique 17
1 Toward a theory of budgeting 19
2 The science of "muddling through," 39
3 Political implications of budgetary reform 57
4 The road to PPB: The stages of budget reform 69
5 A budget for all seasons? Why the traditional budget lasts 95
6 Does budget format really govern the actions of budgetmakers? 113
B Recent Budget Practices Revealed 127
7 Budgeting for results: Recent developments in five industrialized countries 129
8 Entrepreneurial budgeting: An emerging reform? 147
9 Mission-driven, results-oriented budgeting: Fiscal administration and the new public management 169
C Evaluation of Budgeting for Performance 189
10 Budgeting and productivity in state government: Not integrated but friendly 191
11 Linking performance to funding decisions: What is the budgeter's role? 203
12 Management through budgetary incentives 215
A Strategy 231
13 Strategic planning in state and local government 233
14 Strategy, values, and productivity 245
15 Strategy for public and third-sector organizations 261
16 Strategic management in the public sector: Concepts, models, and processes 283
B Performance Management 307
17 Applying professional disclosure standards to productivity financial analyses 309
18 Designing appropriate control mechanisms for managing performance in the federal sector 327
19 Integrating evaluation and budgeting 341
20 Performance measures for budget justifications: Developing a selection strategy 355
21 Analyzing the contracting-out of government services: Relevant cost-benefit considerations 369
22 Bureaucracy, organizational redundancy, and the privatization of public services 385
23 Service efforts and accomplishments reporting: Has its time really come? 405
24 A proper mentality for benchmarking 419
25 Can public officials correctly be said to have obligations to future generations? 427
C Pay for Performance 449
26 Merit pay, performance targeting, and productivity 451
27 The paradox of merit pay in the public sector: Persistence of a problematic procedure 465
28 Of pigs in pokes and policy diffusion: Another look at pay-for-performance 485
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)