Classifying Insects

Classifying Insects

by Andrew Solway
     
 

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Why are shield bugs known as "stink bugs"?

What is metamorphosis?

How many pairs of legs does an insect have?

Classifying Living Things looks at how and why we group animals and plants. Each book starts with an introduction to classification, explaining why grouping organisms helps us to understand the natural world. It also provides information about

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Overview

Why are shield bugs known as "stink bugs"?

What is metamorphosis?

How many pairs of legs does an insect have?

Classifying Living Things looks at how and why we group animals and plants. Each book starts with an introduction to classification, explaining why grouping organisms helps us to understand the natural world. It also provides information about classification systems and the use of common and Latin names. Each title goes on to investigate examples of the more important orders, presenting their characteristics and explaining why some organisms fit into a particular group and others do not. Animals and plants that are endangered or threatened are also discussed.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-Dozens of animal groups with unique adaptations are highlighted in these introductions. In double-page sections, each text explains the principles of scientific classification, describes the outstanding characteristics the animals share, identifies the phylum and class to which they belong, and surveys major orders within the class. One or two snapshot-sized, clear, color photographs of some of the creatures discussed appear on almost every page. Tinted sidebars and boxed extended picture captions provide additional facts. Each title also includes a classification chart and diagram. All three volumes have colorful formats and are well organized and clearly written. Important scientific terms, emphasized in bold print, are defined either as they appear or in the glossary. Classifying Insects, unlike the other two books, only identifies two of the orders it discusses by scientific name; most sections just name the insects representing the order. For instance, the text states that beetles "-are the largest order of insects," but does not mention that they belong to the Coleoptera order. Some of the same animals are included in Robert Snedden's What Is a Fish? (1993), What Is an Insect? (1993), and What Is a Reptile? (1995, all Sierra Club). However, these books are more general in scope, discussing characteristics of each class as a whole rather than focusing on specific orders. By describing the differences between related animal orders, Solway and the Spilsburys offer a different perspective and their books will be useful additions to natural-history collections.-Karey Wehner, formerly at San Francisco Public Library Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781432923556
Publisher:
Heinemann
Publication date:
07/01/2009
Series:
Classifying Living Things Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
IG940L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 10 Years

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