Clausewitz And Chaos

Clausewitz And Chaos

by Stephen J. Cimbala
     
 

ISBN-10: 0275969517

ISBN-13: 9780275969516

Pub. Date: 11/30/2000

Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated

The great Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz, in his classic On War, introduced the idea of friction in war. Friction was one of the most important ideas that Clausewitz put forward. His application of the term is generally taken to be limited to events on the field of battle. But had Clausewitz lived to the end of the 20th century, he

Overview

The great Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz, in his classic On War, introduced the idea of friction in war. Friction was one of the most important ideas that Clausewitz put forward. His application of the term is generally taken to be limited to events on the field of battle. But had Clausewitz lived to the end of the 20th century, he undoubtedly would have broadened his understanding of friction to include the nexus between war and policy making. He would have done so because his most fundamental insight, apart from the significance of friction in war, was his insistence upon the priority of policy over war.

Cimbala applies the concept of friction to a number of 20th century cases of war and policy making. He also applies it to some plausible scenarios for the next century. Although many U.S. military planners and policy makers appear to place their faith in technology as the sine qua non of success in security and defense policy, technology can be self defeating and myopic if political and strategic vision are lacking. For example, the mindless pursuit of information warfare in all its varieties may convince potential U.S. opponents that infowar is a cost effective way of negating U.S. military power. A provocative analysis for scholars, students, military professionals and other policy makers involved with strategy and military policy issues.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780275969516
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/30/2000
Pages:
242
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.56(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction

Case One: Friction in Irrelevant and Inflexible War Plans

Case Two: Friction in Nuclear Crisis Management

Case Three: Failure Amid Success: Desert Storm and Friction

Case Four: Small Wars, Faux Wars and Peace Operations: Sources of Friction

Case Five: Deterrence and Friction

Case Six: Mass Destruction and Information Warfare: Friction in Collision

Conclusion

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