Cleveland Slovacks, Ohio (Images of America Series) by John T. Sabol, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Cleveland Slovacks, Ohio (Images of America Series)

Cleveland Slovacks, Ohio (Images of America Series)

by John T. Sabol
     
 

Cleveland's Slovaks can best be characterized as survivors. Many survived ethnic persecution and poverty so they could have a chance at something better. Beginning with a small core of immigrants seeking work aboveground rather than in the coal mines of neighboring states, Cleveland's Slovak community grew through a giant chain migration. Their neighborhoods

Overview


Cleveland's Slovaks can best be characterized as survivors. Many survived ethnic persecution and poverty so they could have a chance at something better. Beginning with a small core of immigrants seeking work aboveground rather than in the coal mines of neighboring states, Cleveland's Slovak community grew through a giant chain migration. Their neighborhoods flourished close to their jobs and their churches. Many of the ancestors of today's Slovaks came to the United States classified as Hungarians. In their hearts, though, they knew what they were and what language they spoke. They held on to their native language even as they learned English and unwaveringly encouraged their children to strive for the opportunity America offered. According to the 2000 census, 93,500 northeast Ohioans claim Slovak heritage. The photographs in Cleveland Slovaks show their neighborhoods and family life and give readers an appreciation of the community's legacy.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Title: New books recall the accordion days of Cleveland Czechs and Slovaks

Author: Robert L. Smith

Pubisher: The Plain Dealer

Date: 12/3/09

John Sabol's publisher suggested he try to capture Cleveland's Czech and Slovak communities in a single book, but the Seven Hills historian knew better.

The two peoples came in separate waves and didn't do much mixing once they got here. Czechs and Slovaks built their own churches, ethnic halls and traditions, despite the unity portrayed by the former Czechoslovakia.

"They did not give up on that identity," said Sabol, a former reporter and editor for the Cleveland Press. "Cleveland was not so much a melting pot but an area of interesting enclaves."

Arcadia Publishing conceded and Sabol worked with Ithaca, N.Y. writer Lisa Alzo to complete two books, "Cleveland Czechs" and "Cleveland Slovaks," for its Image of America series.

The slim volumes of black and white photographs recount a time when "there was no lack of places providing good accordion lessons" along Broadway Avenue. But the books also point out a lasting legacy.

From the Czech community came Mayor Ralph Perk, Our Lady of Lourdes Church and the landmark Bohemian National Hall. From the Slovak community emerged Paul Newman, Benedictine High School and St. Andrew Abbey.

"The people are still strong," said Sabol. "If you go to a Slovak event, they have good turnouts. I went to the Czech Christmas fair at the Bohemian National Hall. It was jammed."

Both books are available at local booksellers or through www.arcadiapublishing.com.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780738552422
Publisher:
Arcadia Publishing SC
Publication date:
10/28/2009
Series:
Images of America Series
Pages:
127
Sales rank:
601,930
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.40(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author


John T. Sabol is a Cleveland native, writer, and historian who has published several church histories and genealogical articles. Lisa A. Alzo, a freelance writer, instructor, and lecturer, is the author of six books and numerous magazine articles and serves on the board of directors for the Czechoslovak Genealogical Society International.

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