Click: What Millions of People Are Doing Online and Why it Matters

Overview

What time of year do teenage girls search for prom dresses online? How does the quick adoption of technology affect business success (and how is that related to corn farmers in Iowa)? How do time and money affect the gender of visitors to online dating sites? And how is the Internet itself affecting the way we experience the world? In Click, Bill Tancer takes us behind the scenes into the massive database of online intelligence to reveal the naked truth about how we use the Web, navigate to sites, and search for ...
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Overview

What time of year do teenage girls search for prom dresses online? How does the quick adoption of technology affect business success (and how is that related to corn farmers in Iowa)? How do time and money affect the gender of visitors to online dating sites? And how is the Internet itself affecting the way we experience the world? In Click, Bill Tancer takes us behind the scenes into the massive database of online intelligence to reveal the naked truth about how we use the Web, navigate to sites, and search for information--and what all of that says about who we are.

As online directories replace the yellow pages, search engines replace traditional research, and news sites replace newsprint, we are in an age in which we've come to rely tremendously on the Internet--leaving behind a trail of information about ourselves as a culture and the direction in which we are headed. With surprising and practical insight, Tancer demonstrates how the Internet is changing the way we absorb information and how understanding that change can be used to our advantage in business and in life. Click analyzes the new generation of consumerism in a way no other book has before, showing how we use the Internet, and how those trends provide a wealth of market research nearly as vast as the Internet itself. Understanding how we change is integral to our success. After all, we are what we click.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Do Americans really spend that much time surfing porn sites? Which demographic visited Anna Nicole Smith's Web site most frequently? Who reads Perez Hilton? More than mere trivia nuggets, the answers to these questions define online behaviors among a varied mix of Internet users. Tancer, who leads global research at Hitwise, an online market research company, guides the reader through the search patterns among 10 million Internet users, challenging myths and making new discoveries about the psychology of consumers, illustrating that clicks speak louder than words and can reveal unspoken truths about individual drives that are not expressed via other forms of media. Everyone from marketing managers who want to know how much power social networking sites wield in the online market to political pollsters trying to decipher the disconnect between exit polls and election results would be advised to heed his research. Witty and invaluable in its insights, this book is destined to become a primer for online marketers and usability experts while shedding new light on the mindset and curiosities of the average Web surfer, i.e., your friends and neighbors. (Sept.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Kirkus Reviews
Unilluminating overview offers few new insights into how and why we use the Web. Tancer is the general manager of global research for Hitwise, which analyzes the web-browsing habits of ten million Internet users in the United States. Aggregated and analyzed, he asserts, this data "can reveal a great deal about society"-who American users are, what they're interested in and how those interests change and evolve over time. Unfortunately, his conclusions are intuitive and simplistic rather than surprising or complex. For example, it's hardly a revelation that Americans spend a lot of time looking at pornography, or that they might visit porn sites more frequently when they have free time on their hands, such as during the summer or over Christmas vacation. Nor is it remarkable that people are more likely to search for a particular celebrity by name after that celebrity has been arrested, had a baby or died. Tancer certainly delivers on the first part of his subtitle. He gives a broad sense of what people are doing online, from searching for porn and obsessing over celebrities to trying to lose weight and participating in social-networking sites. He's less capable when it comes to explaining why it matters that affluent teenage girls search for prom dresses in January, or that searches for quick-fix diets peak just after New Year's Day. The book includes plenty of data and year-old buzzwords-"today's age of texting, MySpace pages, and that old standby, email"-but few insights into what all that adds up to, or why anyone should care in the first place. Fails to address the significance of Americans' online habits. Agent: Melissa Flashman/Trident Media Group
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781401390303
  • Publisher: Hachette Audio
  • Publication date: 9/2/2008
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Pages: 5
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 5.20 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Bill Tancer is the General Manager of Global Research at Hitwise, an online competitive intelligence company. In addition to his weekly column, "The Science of Search," on Time.com, he has been interviewed and quoted widely in the press including the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, USA Today, Business Week, Forbes Online and CNN Money. He has also appeared on NPR, MSNBC, Dow Jones Market Watch, CNBC, CNN Radio and CBS Radio.
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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 PPC - porn, pills, and casinos 13

Ch. 2 Getting to what we really think 33

Ch. 3 Prom in January 49

Ch. 4 Failed resolutions and the false hope syndrome 69

Ch. 5 Celebrity worship syndrome 87

Ch. 6 What are you afraid of? : and other telling questions 101

Ch. 7 Web Who.0 119

Ch. 8 Data rocks and the television-Internet connection 141

Ch. 9 Women wrestlers and arbitraging financial markets 155

Ch. 10 Finding the early adopters 171

Ch. 11 Super-connectors and predicting the next rock star 185

Epilogue Who we are and why it matters 199

Notes 205

Glossary 211

Index 213

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